New Pole Lathe

discussion of the niceties of turning on a bow, bungee or pole lathe.

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

New Pole Lathe

Postby neilyeag » Mon Sep 22, 2014 9:46 am

After countless hours of research, I finally settled on a design and built my lathe. Bungee powered. Got set up this weekend and at least turned something square into something kind of round. I am happy for the start. Now will practice, practice. Would like to take a shot at doing a simple (small) bowl. But will make some hook tools first.

Having fun!

Image

Image

Image
neilyeag
new member
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Sep 17, 2014 10:53 am
Location: Thailand

Re: New Pole Lathe

Postby Steve Martin » Mon Sep 22, 2014 7:27 pm

Nice lathe. Am just wondering if you plan to put notches on the tool rest holders to give space for bowl blank? or how do you plan to do that?
Steve Martin
Regular
 
Posts: 153
Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2007 6:34 am
Location: Rockwell, North Carolina, USA

Re: New Pole Lathe

Postby neilyeag » Tue Sep 23, 2014 4:35 am

Not sure about the notches on the tool rest yet. I want to play with it a bit to see how it works first. I have seem some pics with notches, but may with nothing. I was thinking on the right hand side, I will just put a dowel pin for a swivel, and try it that way.

Neil
neilyeag
new member
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Sep 17, 2014 10:53 am
Location: Thailand

Re: New Pole Lathe

Postby TonyH » Tue Sep 23, 2014 1:24 pm

On the subject of tool rests ... This is meant more as a question and not a criticism of this particular lathe. Perhaps I should have started a new thread, but ...

I am not a greatly experienced turner, but I am an engineer, and I've looked at a goodly few pole/bowl lathes. It seems to me that the lathe really only serves to rigidly hold the two centres, and the tool relative to them. Now, why is it then that I often see beefy, sometimes massively constructed lathes, with a toolrest that is no more than a loose stick, not even fastened to the rest of the lathe ? It seems to me to be an often neglected bit of design - it is useful to be able to get it in close, or position it further out for a bigger workpiece. On the course where I first used a lathe they had a loose piece of wood for a toolrest, and an annoying arrangement of bits of packing to position it, which you were forever picking up off the floor !
TonyH
Regular
 
Posts: 88
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2012 5:32 pm
Location: Bedfordshire

Re: New Pole Lathe

Postby neilyeag » Wed Sep 24, 2014 4:17 am

Tony, I hope some of the experience people will join in on this question. I agree, I have seem so many pictures and videos, and as you say many times the tool rest seems to be just a well used "stick" On my lathe, I just put this "rest" in place to try the thing out. I know I have to make some improvements. But truthfully I have never even seen a pole lathe in person. Only on the WEB ha. (don't think there are many (any) in this part of the world?)

I did see a fairly in depth post on adjustable rests. I am just going to play around with mine for a while and see where it goes.
neilyeag
new member
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Sep 17, 2014 10:53 am
Location: Thailand

Re: New Pole Lathe

Postby jamestownsonn » Fri Sep 26, 2014 9:23 am

Hello,
I have been using a polelathe for spindles and bowls for some time quite successfully and have never used a straight edged tool rest fixed to the lathe. I have never used a powered lathe so came to the task with no preconceptions of precise turning. The two metal points on my lathe are not in line either. My lathes have been made from whatever wood came to hand for free, I did buy the threaded bar but bent and shaped the ends myself. I used have nails in the part that the tool rest, rests on to hold the tool rest away from the billet but found that it was sometimes easier to control that with a finger rather than fiddle with a mechanism to hold the rest at a distance from the turning billet.

The two points that hold the billet form the axis and the rest of the lathe with my hand/body eye coordination do the rest. This does all work, honestly, but is is a more freeform approach than the engineers lathe. I have just spent 4 days at the Assoc Professional Foresters show in Ragleth Hall, Warwickshire, and all the lathes in use by APT's members there were not precision instruments, but all make saleable chairs, bowls etc for the professional member.

I have heard the comments in this thread before and can only say it becomes clearer when you turn a few billets and relax into the craft. I know that may not sound very helpful at the moment.

By the way I have been a member for many years but lost my login so have rejoined
jamestownsonn
new member
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Sep 25, 2014 3:53 pm

Re: New Pole Lathe

Postby veto » Fri Nov 07, 2014 1:31 am

Here is a question for Tony H, what would be the purpose of heavier/hardier tool rests? I understand the issue of it being poorly engineered and here is my take on that. It is likely the last bit fashioned and many of us are just overgrown kids who can't wait to do something with what they have built. Although I am on my second tool rest and it is still a bit understated the post above explains it fairly well. More disciplined builders likely do fashion something more substantial, I have seen it both ways. Bowl turners usually have a more rigid set up from my viewpoint than guys who do only spindle work. The original idea remember is the portability, if you are toting this on your back from lot to lot the minimum to do the job becomes an important issue, something we now take for granted.
veto
Regular
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Sun Jun 20, 2010 8:51 pm
Location: Albany, Wisconsin


Return to Polelathe turning

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron