Winter workshops

Discuss new ways of doing things, old ways adapted to new contexts.

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Winter workshops

Postby Rob. N » Sun Dec 20, 2009 4:12 pm

Getting up today and seeing my workshop looking like santas grotto i thought i would have ago at doing some winter forging.
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but i thought "i wonder what other peoples workshops look like in the winter?"

so if people have got a few pics of there workshops covered in snow post them here.
http://robswoodwork.blogspot.com/

People love chopping wood. In this activity one immediately see's the results. (Albert Einstein)
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby Nicola Wood » Sun Dec 20, 2009 8:41 pm

I'm sure Rob's workshop looks lovely right now, however he'd need a 4x4 to get there and even then, the way it's drifting it might be a struggle! We've been spoon carving in the front room in front of the fire instead, it's nice and cozy :wink:
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby RichardLaw » Sun Dec 20, 2009 10:04 pm

Here's mine yesterday - even more snowy today
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And it did need a 4x4 to get there!
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Note the Denver boot on the trailer, wooah paranoia well and truly set in!
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby Rob. N » Mon Dec 21, 2009 11:00 am

am loving the photos. truly a wonderful place to work :D (even if it is a bit nippy)

Note the Denver boot on the trailer, wooah paranoia well and truly set in


nowt wrong with taking precuations. glad to see that you have your transport back though :D .

We've been spoon carving in the front room in front of the fire instead, it's nice and cozy :wink:


now that is a very good idea.
http://robswoodwork.blogspot.com/

People love chopping wood. In this activity one immediately see's the results. (Albert Einstein)
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby woodchubber » Mon Dec 21, 2009 11:25 am

What would I give to be able to do a bit of whittling in the living room; but alas I'm married to Hyacinth Bucket incarnate.
Richard, if you're working outside in this weather mate I've got to doff my cap to you.My hands feel numb just looking at those stills! Do you have any problems controlling edge tools? Also,are you a permenant fixture at Bolton Abbey? If so, and you accept visitors, I'll bob up and do a bit of whittling myself with you after Christmas for some company if you like as I live fairly local.
Cheers John
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby paul atkin » Mon Dec 21, 2009 3:23 pm

Hats off to you Richard you must be mad :shock:
here mine looking rather pretty

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http://paulatkin.co.uk/




{the one with the pole of glee} morrigan 2008
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby Donald Todd » Mon Dec 21, 2009 3:38 pm

In my corner of the woods we have had only about 1/2" of snow so far. I did a little turning this morning!
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby robin wood » Mon Dec 21, 2009 6:00 pm

No way I am getting up to my workshop at the moment, everything is looking very pretty around here though.
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby SeanHellman » Mon Dec 21, 2009 9:22 pm

Snow! whats that? We are having lovely sunny days down here in Devon. No snow just temps from -2 to 6 c

I have been doing a Christmas exhibition for the last week and I am very glad not to be in the workshop, even with a large woodburner at the end of the day I can sometimes get the temp up to 10 c.

Donald, turning in a green house? ever broken a window yet?
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby Donald Todd » Mon Dec 21, 2009 11:46 pm

Nope! I've only ever had one small piece fly out. I only turn in the greenhouse if I'm desperate to finish a job; it's really too cramped; I don't get the full stroke length possible from the treadle and the height's wrong. The lathe hibernates in the greenhouse, though I can carry it outside easily. The advantage of the greenhouse is the good lighting, even when covered in snow and ice! Using the shavehorse in there is fine. This morning I only had 5 layers of clothing on; it was after all a sweltering –4ºC!
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby RichardLaw » Tue Dec 22, 2009 8:38 am

Hey, reviewing the first photo in my post above, you must all think I have one leg longer than t'other! I failed to straighten the picture up (or take it level in the first place, more like). My lathe does not slope at a giddying 20 degrees, it is in fact level, of course - you can't believe everything you see on this forum!

Richard D will testify to the cool location, especially this Sunday past, I'm sorry about all that smaoke mate, but you did do a really good job soldiering on and getting your stool finished.

John, call in sometime. I'm taking a break over Christmas as my lil boy and his wife are over from NYC and my daughter up from t'Smoake. Drop me an email when you are thinking of coming and I'll let you know when I'm back on duty. Hoping to get back thinning again after Christmas, but no power saws allowed Sundays so I'm always at t'Bodgery then.

Paul, that shack looks really inviting, looking forward to coming over in the New Year, can you pm me when the hooks are likely to be ready?

Season's greetings to you all!

And here's a mini Christmas quiz. What tree is this? I'd like to say there's a prize for the first correct answer, but you all have wooden stuff aplenty!
(Richard D you must have seen me taking this so you're out of the comp running)
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby goldsmithexile » Tue Dec 22, 2009 10:27 am

woodchubber wrote:What would I give to be able to do a bit of whittling in the living room; but alas I'm married to Hyacinth Bucket incarnate.


LOL well you could always build one of those rather plush sheds like Paul's or Rob's, add some carpets and curtains (and a telephone of course), then tell the wife to keep up appearances in there while you have a good whittle indoors in front of your fire.... :D
My wife is house proud and good for her, but I happily whittle when I want to. I use a tarp to catch most of the chips then vaccum up afterwards. The only reason I dont use an axe indoors is because of the 3 kids wreaking havoc.....that and the fact that the noise would be a bit much as the floors arent concrete.
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby woodchubber » Tue Dec 22, 2009 11:20 am

Well I suppose I was being a little disingenuous as I do some finish cuts on carvings in the spare room, but like you the axe stays in the workshop.I don't really have an excuse anyway as I recently built a decent workshop (not quite to the spec of the aforementioned) and incorporated loads of insulation and moisture barrier.This means it is dead easy to warm up with just a single Oil-filled radiator. I think I'll dig out the shed build photos and post them (one of the rare instances I've remembered to take WIP shots!), they may be useful to anyone considering building their own workshop.
Richard - cheers I will do, but it will be when the weather picks up as I only have a "chucklebus" (berlingo). I'm always interested in sharing in the enthusiasm of other woodworkers- which you clearly have. As for the tree I suppose Oak is too obvious so it must be something like Maple or Walnut?? Chapeau for giving yourself a bit of time off by the way!
Seasonal regards to all, John
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby woodness sake » Fri Dec 25, 2009 12:38 am

I live in Delaware, just east of Washington DC. We got 2 feet of snow last Saturday. I used to have a tarp over my lathe like a bodger's hut but the place where we live has a nymber of rules about what you are a llowed to have in your yard in the way of "structures" and my wife was not comfortable with this tent thing out there. Anyway, the bulge in the front is my workbench and the bulge behind the springpole is my lathe and shavehorse. I'm not getting much done with it this week and in fact not much this year as we have had a very rainy summer. Ah well. Merry Christmas to all and a good new year as well.
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Re: Winter workshops

Postby gavin » Fri Dec 25, 2009 11:36 am

woodness sake wrote:... I'm not getting much done with it this week and in fact not much this year as we have had a very rainy summer. Ah well.

This whole issue of how your workshop is made comfortable is so important. But on this forum we don't seem to think or talk about this at all.

New Years resolution - but not today on Xmas Day (cos I got some fizzy wine to drink :mrgreen: and a wife-to-be to enjoy :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: ) - is to explore ways to make the workshop more comfortable and easy to use. Cos if it aint warm or at least dry nothing will happen in it.

woodness sake wrote:... but the place where we live has a nymber of rules about what you are a llowed to have in your yard in the way of "structures" and my wife was not comfortable with this tent thing out there.

Yep, it's not just we woodworkers who need to be happy. It is wives/ partners/ neighbours who may not see the need for piles of wood and metal and useful resources to lie around in what they see as prime beauty or gardening spots.

Of course, most readers of this BB will have known since they first placed a sharp edge on wood that there is NOTHING wrong with useful piles of salvaged raw materials being stored against the eventual day of their finding a purpose in the grand scheme of things. Sadly not everyone sees it like this... :roll:
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