Stock Knife Spoon Making?

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Re: Stock Knife Spoon Making?

Postby Mark Allery » Mon Mar 28, 2011 6:50 pm

Roger Day wrote:Also as an experiment I attached a car track rod end as the pivot to give me as much axial rotational frexibility as possible.


Photo please Roger - this really made me smile. Great sideways thinking! I always incorporate bits of old Landrover into my lathes - here is another possibility!

cheers

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Re: Stock Knife Spoon Making?

Postby RichardLaw » Mon Mar 28, 2011 10:24 pm

Vicious ripping shavings to make billets for the lathe - bevel down.

Careful paring of a board to flatten it (too idle to get off the horse and get the plane out) bevel up.
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Re: Stock Knife Spoon Making?

Postby Roger Day » Mon Mar 28, 2011 11:56 pm

OOOPsss Richard....I have my up/down the wrong way round I think..... Been working alone for too long.... Which is what?:?
Yes Mark, that's the spirit..... Recycled engineering componants = endless possibilities
It was just the ball as I had satisfied my need for "How does this failed componant works" by taking it apart years ago. I had to make the cup in wood. But I am thinking that I'll turn a complete wooden one next time to make it even better. The original had an limit of arc movement of about 45 Degrees, but I found drawings on the net that were up to 150 Degrees. I even considered making a universal joint that was as wide in movement as you would ever need.
I have not worked out a quick release method so the knife hung in the air after use, and is a possible sharps hazard. A guard works well but I still like the way a traditional hook can be disconnected so easily. oh and in the pictures you see it has a scaffold tube casement. Thats because I was using it on a test rig, which I use scaffold for, kind of like Meccano for Adults.
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Re: Stock Knife Spoon Making?

Postby Paul Thornton 2sheds » Wed Jul 27, 2011 9:22 pm

i had never ever used a stock knife until last week when Trefor Owen (the last trditional clog maker in Wales) insisted i tried to shape a spoon with his stock knife as we demonstrted side by side at the Rowyal Welsh last week.
i was amazed by the control i could have with the cuts, really fineif i wished which suprised me from such a heavy blade and having never used one before.

fun, interesting but heavy and not for me! knife and axe all the way for me.
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Re: Stock Knife Spoon Making?

Postby robin wood » Wed Jul 27, 2011 11:36 pm

Paul Thornton 2sheds wrote:Trefor Owen (the last trditional clog maker in Wales)

Sorry to take thios thread off topic but Trefor is a good self publicist but this is simply not true. Jeremy Atkinson taught Geraint Parfitt at St Fagans several years ago now and Geraint has been making good clogs for at least 3 years. There is also some question as to the degree of machinery employed, demonstrating clog knives at shows but selling bandsawn soles etc.

See comments on his youtube here http://www.youtube.com/all_comments?v=pgY68ffuTG0

Also compare how well the knives are being used in Trefors youtube to this clip of Jeremy teaching Geraint http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmKjvhQ4IHg

This matters because it is cutting soles from logs with knives where the skill lies. Walkleys at Hebden Bridge produce tens of thousands of clogs from bandsawn soles. A hand cut sole also tends to be better because it has more "spring" so is easier to walk in.
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Re: Stock Knife Spoon Making?

Postby RichardLaw » Thu Jul 28, 2011 7:52 am

Ah! Those far remembered days of hand-made clogs, when the clogger would feel your foot and make the sole to fit it! In the later years of the Walkley's clog factory they used copy lathes to finish the soles - so they were all exactly the same (different sizes, of course).

No idea what Walkleys are up to now, they moved a short distance and I understand are a much smaller concern. Bet they still have the copy lathe though. I think is was converted from some other manufacture, was it cricket bats?

By the way the stock knife is a very good way to make shrink pot bases (I would say bottoms, but that would probably be censored). I rough them out and thin them with the stock knife, and then subsequent finishing them to fit with a hand knife is a breeze (as they might say in Chicago).
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Re: Stock Knife Spoon Making?

Postby Paul Thornton 2sheds » Thu Jul 28, 2011 9:52 am

robin wood wrote:
Paul Thornton 2sheds wrote:Trefor Owen (the last trditional clog maker in Wales)

Sorry to take thios thread off topic but Trefor is a good self publicist but this is simply not true.


niave ain t i :o i just believe what i am told.
i clearly need to think of an imaginative way to make myself unique.
learning more every day
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Re: Stock Knife Spoon Making?

Postby jez » Wed Nov 20, 2013 8:34 pm

Not your fault Paul. Trefor's never allowed the truth to get in the way of a good story. I was carving at a show and Trefor turned up. Didn't introduce himself and after watching for about half an hour turned to his partner and commented "This is a very old fashioned way of working". Shortly after he started carving at shows. Ten years later and I've still not seen a handcarved pair by him
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