Heating a workshop

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Heating a workshop

Postby Baggy » Tue Nov 15, 2011 7:36 pm

Hi all

I have built myself a workshop to carve in and would like to heat it a bit, take the chill off so that the dog is comfortable :-)

It seems obvious to use wood as the fuel.

I would be interested to hear how you heat your workshops?
Pics would be interesting as well.
Best wishes
Mark
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Re: Heating a workshop

Postby Bob_Fleet » Tue Nov 15, 2011 9:16 pm

You can kill two birds with one stone and run a dehumidifier in it.
It probably is only good enough for a bit of background heating but it does add a few degrees and might act as a frost preventer.
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Re: Heating a workshop

Postby gavin » Wed Nov 16, 2011 9:15 am

Baggy wrote:Hi all

I have built myself a workshop to carve in and would like to heat it a bit, take the chill off so that the dog is comfortable :-)

It seems obvious to use wood as the fuel.

I would be interested to hear how you heat your workshops?
Pics would be interesting as well.

I'd recommend some steel container with a fire in it - fancy name is a stove, and you can make one from an old gas cylinder. I bought one of them on ebay, but then found the one below in a field. :lol: You'll need to spend money on a chimney and waterproof roof piercing. Even tho my commercially-made stove came free, I still had to spend circa £500 on chimney and roof fixings.

Image

But it does not heat the whole workshop. I drop the carpet-curtain behind sometimes to contain some heat.
I'd look on ebay - heavy things like stoves may be available cheaply locally.
If you own your shed, it makes sense to fit a decent, expensive chimney. If you won't have 5 years in the shed, it probably makes less sense to spend money fitting chimneys. A lot of heat comes from the chimney's radiation.
Gavin Phillips


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Re: Heating a workshop

Postby FGYT » Wed Nov 16, 2011 12:31 pm

FOr my old workshop in the end of the garage i used a paraffin heater with bulk paraffin ( lot cheaper than the 4ltr bottles in B&Q)

not sure what Im going to do in the new one there's not really room for a wood stove tho i do have a spare one ive heavily insulated the walls and need to do the roof i suspect it will be the paraffin heater again this winter as i can put it in the middle of the room and move it out the way if needed.

ATB

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Re: Heating a workshop

Postby JonnyP » Wed Nov 16, 2011 6:59 pm

If you can sort a chimney, then a sawdust stove would be an efficient and cheap to run stove.. Maybe..
http://www.motherearthnews.com/Do-It-Yo ... Stove.aspx

Maybe you could put the dog on a treadmill, rigged up to a light bulb. Free light, warm dog and no need to go out for walkies on a cold evening.. :D

I have no heating in my workshop, so if I get cold in there I jump on the bungee lathe to warm up..
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Re: Heating a workshop

Postby Don Wagstaff » Wed Nov 16, 2011 8:48 pm

Hello,

No heating here in the workshop either, (yet). It means around this time of year all the water stones for sharpening move into the house part.

Greetings,

Don Wagstaff
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Re: Heating a workshop

Postby Baggy » Fri Nov 18, 2011 10:25 am

Thanks all

I really like the sawdust stove idea, so I will have a go at that first.
Best wishes
Mark
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I can spell but I cannot type.

Photos of the Chelmer and Blackwater canal
http://markbaigent.zenfolio.com/chelmer_blackwater
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