Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

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Re: Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

Postby Darren » Fri Nov 09, 2012 3:13 pm

I thought it was a shame that the crooked logs are just firewood. I love making furniture using unusual shaped wood.
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Re: Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

Postby ToneWood » Fri Nov 09, 2012 9:37 pm

Bob_Fleet wrote:... must get some vines planted.
Good luck with that. :D I've just been stoking up the wood-burner down here tonight, 350miles further south. Actually, there is already a vineyard just a few miles from here. A local farmer experimenting. They managed some white wine last year (or possibly the year before) - haven't heard if they managed anything this year. I expect the near constant rain might have hampered things but you never know. Elder grows prolifically round here like a weed, the flowers make a v. pleasant white wine & I believe it is possible to make a red wine from the berries too (never tried it though). Never tasted anything better than cowslip wine - but alas an endangered species now, and extremely work intensive to gather & process, we did it but once, many years ago.
Last edited by ToneWood on Sun Nov 11, 2012 6:26 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

Postby Bulworthy Project » Sun Nov 11, 2012 5:39 pm

Elderberry wine... delicious!
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Re: Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

Postby ToneWood » Tue Nov 20, 2012 10:20 pm

I've been watching episode 5: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 ... Episode_5/
The charcoal burning reminded of the father & son charcoal burners featured in the children's book, Swallows and Amazons (unfortunately can't recommend the book, nice story but long, slow & drawn out, lots of sailing terminology). I've seen a metal charcoal kiln like that in the woods nearby recently - seems to be quite the thing.

Do people really pay to mountain bike? I enjoy mountain biking in the woods occasionally but wouldn't pay for it. I see some youngsters nearby have made some bowls & trails with ramps. Not sure it's as low impact* as they make out in the TV program but they are real fun to ride and, in the scheme of things, better for the youngsters to be occupying themselves like this than many of the alternatives.

*Saw some research in the USA (done by the Park Service I think), mountain bikes have far less impact on paths & single-track than horses.
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Re: Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

Postby markclay » Wed Nov 21, 2012 9:45 pm

I love this program. Agreed its not for you if you don’t like 'pithy', ‘patronising’, ‘scant’, disingenous, etc etc but despite these drawbacks at least it hints at a possible broader appreciation of woodland. There’s not too much false jeopardy and the presenter’s enthusiasm for what he's doing makes up for a lot.
To retread old posts, Ashdown forest near Crowborough might be a good example of Royal Forest mentioned?

Ancient trees
Just wondered, does this term refer to old managed trees rather than primary growth specimens? Are there any primary growth trees anywhere in the UK?

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Re: Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

Postby Toby Allen » Fri Nov 23, 2012 10:16 pm

I watched a bit of him making charcoal then turned it off. I'm sure he'll be running courses soon.
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Re: Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

Postby JonnyP » Fri Nov 23, 2012 11:08 pm

I very much enjoyed that series :0)
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Re: Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

Postby ToneWood » Mon Nov 26, 2012 9:39 pm

I must have fallen a week behind! Here is a link to the last episode, #6: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 ... Episode_6/ ("only 5 days left" to view :( )

Selling bean poles, who'd a thought it! Fab ash chairs (£500!). The bat, stumps & handle maker normally imports his ash from the USA! We need infrastructure - presumably that means a regular, reliable supply, of good timber, unfortunate timing with ash die-back just setting in :( - perhaps they should add an epilogue on that. Working copse in the Malverns was good - interesting to see how the wild flowers thrive in the opened up, managed wood (perhaps this is what our bees need?). Nice River Cottage style party at the end, eating squirrels from the wood & sausages from the pigs reared, cooked on charcoal that he made, drinking perry (pear cider) from his garden.

The narration reminds me of Victorian/Edwardian/War-time farm/River Cottage. Good series all.
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Re: Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

Postby Davie Crockett » Tue Nov 27, 2012 3:19 pm

Tonewood wrote:
Working copse in the Malverns was good - interesting to see how the wild flowers thrive in the opened up, managed wood (perhaps this is what our bees need?)


We've got some very healthy coppice volunteer groups in the Malvern area. Dave Jackson (log to leg Champ) organises the coppice days on behalf of the Malvern Hills Conservators and manages the resulting restored woodland. There's also the Malvern Community Forest group who are active converting pockets of community shared land into woodland for local recreation and education.

The resulting woodland has an astonishing range of wildlife coming back into it.

Nice to be involved at grass roots level! :D
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Re: Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

Postby Brian Williamson » Tue Nov 27, 2012 4:06 pm

ToneWood wrote: interesting to see how the wild flowers thrive in the opened up, managed wood (perhaps this is what our bees need?)


This was one of the less impressive bits of the series. Ragwort and thistle (which is what they showed) are not characteristic of coppice woodland, rather of pasture and disturbed ground. Judging by the leaf on the trees the film crew were there too late in the season and so probably could only film what was in flower. I'm sure, had they been there earlier, Dave Jackson could have found some much more interesting plants to show them (and us).

Woodland flowers are at their best before the trees have leafed out considerably, so April is probably the best month, although plenty of flowers will be out earlier. Coppice is no different, but the cyclical nature of the cutting means that the ground flora is at its best in the second and third years after cutting. It declines thereafter as the coppice grows up and it is 'released' again at the subsequent cutting.

The best ground floras that I've ever seen (and I've seen a few) have been on sites that have had continuous commercial management - a very powerful demonstration of the truism that wildlife is not exclusive to nature reserves.

Brian.
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Re: Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

Postby Paul Thornton 2sheds » Thu Nov 29, 2012 6:34 pm

Brian Williamson wrote:
Woodland flowers are at their best before the trees have leafed out considerably, so April is probably the best month, although plenty of flowers will be out earlier. Coppice is no different, but the cyclical nature of the cutting means that the ground flora is at its best in the second and third years after cutting. It declines thereafter as the coppice grows up and it is 'released' again at the subsequent cutting.

The best ground floras that I've ever seen (and I've seen a few) have been on sites that have had continuous commercial management - a very powerful demonstration of the truism that wildlife is not exclusive to nature reserves.

Brian.



Brian, if the bodgers forum had a like button like facespace i would be liking what you have said :D

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Re: Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

Postby ToneWood » Tue Dec 11, 2012 3:04 pm

Brian and the Westonbirt lime tree were on TV again this week. This time on BBC1, Countryfile. It was a good episode: Westonbirt Arboretum/Brian's Lime, English truffles & Forest of Dean common land sheep grazing. Good to see Brian and another using axes (Gransfors?) to fell some of them - it didn't take long at all, although others used Stihl chainsaws to cut most of the trunks.
BTW Brian, what is the lime wood that you cut used for (apart from the bark being used for its fibre, as shown on the program)?
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Re: Tales From The Wildwood BBC4

Postby ToneWood » Fri Apr 19, 2013 4:25 pm

We discussed old oaks on this thread, Radio 4 has a piece on an old Welsh oak that blew down this week:
"Pontfadog Oak: 1,200-year-old tree toppled by winds"
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-22202815
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