Ash die-back

vaguely woodworking

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

Ash die-back

Postby HughSpencer » Fri Oct 26, 2012 3:08 pm

So now the government are banning the movement of Ash trees from Europe to the UK and within the UK.
This after 95% of Ash trees are wiped in one European country.
When are these idiots going to take biosecurity seriously?
Surely, if the EU can ban UK cattle export when a few hundred cows show up with 'Mad cow disease' we don't have to wait until Ash die-back disease is well and truly established in this country?
Wouldn't the knowledge that 5% of Belgian Ash had died been enough to ban all imports?

Maybe they want the Ash to all die then they won't have to worry about selling off the land that the trees once grew on. Thus avoiding raising the ire of the general public.
User avatar
HughSpencer
Site Admin
 
Posts: 430
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2005 12:05 am
Location: Peterborough

Re: Ash die-back

Postby magnet » Fri Oct 26, 2012 4:48 pm

HughSpencer wrote:So now the government are banning the movement of Ash trees from Europe to the UK and within the UK.
This after 95% of Ash trees are wiped in one European country.
When are these idiots going to take biosecurity seriously?
Surely, if the EU can ban UK cattle export when a few hundred cows show up with 'Mad cow disease' we don't have to wait until Ash die-back disease is well and truly established in this country?
Wouldn't the knowledge that 5% of Belgian Ash had died been enough to ban all imports?

Maybe they want the Ash to all die then they won't have to worry about selling off the land that the trees once grew on. Thus avoiding raising the ire of the general public.

Amen to that ,very well said.What in the hell are we doing importing Ash,when one considers that we have ash trees growing out of cracks in the pavements. I have been collecting ash keys for a few weeks now,i intend to keep them in the hope that i will be able to grow a few seedlings at some point down the line
magnet
Regular
 
Posts: 23
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2011 7:32 pm
Location: northumberland

Re: Ash die-back

Postby robin wood » Fri Oct 26, 2012 9:15 pm

Journalists do love a "all the xxxx trees are going to die" story. Oh yes I know about the elms but I also know there are lots of mature elms living including one 3 foot diameter 50 feet from where I type, few people ever recognise them. Then do we remember how all the Alder trees were going to die of phytopthera a few years ago? all the sweet chestnut too a year or two later, last year it was Horse chestnut with the weepy canker thing, this year it's ash, I am not too worried. If 95% of our ash dies it will be a great glut and the space will be taken by other trees. I am more concerned by the fact that for years we have been importing most of our ash from the US and most of our oak from France. 20 years ago when trying to market timber for the National Trust I could find no one (other than selling direct to local furniture makers) that would pay even 20p per cube premium for English ash or oak grown on a National Trust NNR over imported I do hope that situation has changed but I suspect not.
http://www.robin-wood.co.uk bowls, books and courses
User avatar
robin wood
Regular
 
Posts: 1670
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2006 10:21 am
Location: derbyshire

Re: Ash die-back

Postby Mark Allery » Sun Oct 28, 2012 8:20 pm

By coincidence I had the opportunity to chat to an FC employee yesterday in the East of England and who has been involved with this since February. I was surprised (don't know why really) to learn that until now they have all been prohibited from talking about it but he reckoned that since it's in the public domain now he's not gagged anymore. I still manage to get wound up when I discover that politicians and civil servants are playing 'Sir Humphrey' with information and I think it likely this mindless approach has actually caused some of the current media hysteria.

Apparently he has recently visited two sites in East Anglia where the fungus has ring barked more mature trees and epicormic growth below the ringbarking is easily more than a year old and probably more than two years. This seems to imply that the fungus has been here for much longer than the reported february nursery discovery and possibly also that importing ash samplings may not be the only mechanism for transmission from the continent - there is even a thought that the spores could possibly be windborne. It also raises some possibility that the infection rate may not be quite as exponential as first speculated and that the UK mature trees may have more resistance, but we don't know yet and I guess we'll soon find out more if 'Sir Humphrey' allows it.

I am so schizophrenic about Ash. I love it standing (but mainly because I might be able to use it in the future) and I love to have a pile of it green for working - and I am enjoying sitting in front of the stove which is burning a mixture of ash and oak right now! Ash green or ash dry - fit for a bodger to warm his feet by!

Totally agree with the comments about our inability to value and pay for our own wood in this country. Just like Danish Bacon and New Zealand lamb really! I can feel a rant about FSC certification coming on - but I'll leave that for another day,

cheers

Mark
Polelathe Turner, Woodsman & Green Woodworker. Demonstrations and Coppice Products
http://woodlandantics.wordpress.com
woodland.antics@virgin.net
User avatar
Mark Allery
Regular
 
Posts: 314
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 5:50 pm
Location: Lynchmere, Western Weald

Re: Ash die-back

Postby davestovell » Tue Oct 30, 2012 3:10 pm

Came across these people on twitter who seem to be collecting sightings of possible trees that may have dieback @AshTag_Adapt. They are based at the University of East Anglia and make an app for taking photo"s and then sending image to them.
User avatar
davestovell
Regular
 
Posts: 221
Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2008 4:33 pm
Location: braintree

Re: Ash die-back

Postby ToneWood » Mon Nov 05, 2012 2:48 pm

I see one ash nursery is now suing the government, I think over its delay in granting a destroy order after the disease was first identified & reported by the nursery. If the government prevented the destruction of diseased trees, then I think they need to account for the delay. They (the previous government, the current government, and the civil service/DEFRA/FC) are already facing scrutiny over their complacency and subsequent failure to act, until now. However, *if* the nursery owner was importing ash trees, presumably knowing that they might be diseased, and/or simply delayed destroying the trees in the hope of government compensation, then I have little sympathy for him/her/them.

BTW there are 2 other threads on Ash die-back:
viewtopic.php?f=23&t=2605&p=21146&hilit=ash#p21146
viewtopic.php?f=23&t=2438

Mail: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... ought.html
Image
ToneWood
Regular
 
Posts: 1846
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 2:21 pm


Return to Any other business

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron