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Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 12:22 am
by JonnyP
I usually have saturday evening to myself to faff about in my workshop.. Sometimes I do not get much done, but I am pleased with what I did tonight.. (esp after 5 doombars)

I recently broke the handle on a saucepan, so I wanted to mend it..

the broken handle..
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New handle made using wood from the farm..
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Next up is something I have been wanting to do for a long time..
I dunno what you guys are like, but I love my own knife fork n spoon. I like to use the same ones, ones I get on with and enjoy eating with.
I like this old knife and I like the shape of this fork, but I wanted to personalise and make better..

This is the old knife n fork..
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The handle on the knife was getting knackered, and the fork handle was not nice in my hand, so I did this..
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The wood is yew. I used yew cos it polishes up so nice, and I have me a nice bit of 150 year old..

I have me many spoons I have made and like to eat from, but none match the knife n fork, so I now have me a job to do next saturday evening..
My Janie does not get me liking my own cutlery, but its a big/little thing to me to eat on my own made favourite plate using my favourite knife fork n spoon..

Anyone else strange like me, or is it just me..?

Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 2:04 am
by JonnyP
When I was cutting down the new handle for the knife, I saw this white marking going through the wood.. I have never seen this before.. Anyone know what it is or whats caused it..?
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Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 6:29 pm
by JonnyP
I could not wait till next saturday to make me a matching spoon, so I knocked one up today..
I took inspiration from the knife making boys and joined two materials using a nail inserted into each section, glued in place. The bowl is chestnut burl.
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I am going to make more spoons like this I think, using different materials like antler and horn..

Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 7:22 pm
by Jane
These look great, you've inspired me to make a handle for a fork.
I've taken the plastic handle off one I had that was wobbly and am in the proccess of carving a handle out of Laburnum wood. I started it this afternoon just after I saw your post but keep having to stop to rest my hands as its from a tree that I cut down in August and the middle, dark bit that i've decided to use is very hard. Lovely colour though and I think it should look good if I manage to get it done.

Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 8:53 pm
by Brian Williamson
JonnyP wrote:When I was cutting down the new handle for the knife, I saw this white marking going through the wood.. I have never seen this before.. Anyone know what it is or whats caused it..?
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I was flicking through this thread and saw your question. My instant response was 'is it yew?' an yes, I discover that's what you were using.

I've found this often in yew that I've felled and milled, never in other trees. We always knew it as 'chalk lines' and I think that I've only ever seen it in yew grown on chalk. Despite having given it a name I can't tell you what it is. Some kind of calcium deposit in the wood? Did your yew come off chalk (or possibly limestone) or was it on something else?

Brian.

Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 9:41 pm
by JonnyP
I am pretty sure the yew was felled here in Cornwall Brian, but I am working with the guy who felled it tomorrow, so will ask him. If so, I doubt its a chalk line, as I am fairly sure there is no chalk here. We do have the china clay which is white though.

I would like to see a pic of your finished fork Jane. Laburnum is a nice wood..

Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 9:58 pm
by SeanHellman
Great going Jonny, love it. I know what you mean about using the same eating implements. Even with friends and family I seem a bit odd for doing this, but there are far more of us out there. You are not alone 8) .
Agree with Brian about the chalk lines. I often find them in yew.

Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 10:56 pm
by ToneWood
I know what you mean about those knives. We used them as kids, I think they work better than the thicker, heavier but less broad stainless steel knives that are more common now. I think they spread butter better (esp. the broader ones with parallel sides, semi-circle top & squarer handle) and my mother used one for peeling potatoes in preference to a potato peeler or sharp vegetable knife, probably still does actually :). The handles were always the weak spot. I think what you've done is rather wonderful & clever. I wonder how many of us like those knives? Do you think it would be dishwasher safe now? If so, you might have started something :D

What sort of wood is it? Oak has light colored lines going through it in a distinctive way - you can often see it in oak floors and table tops. I have no idea what causes it though, nor the wonderful 3-D effects seen in maple taken from near the roots* (flame/quilt/tiger strip/etc.).

e.g. *PRS guitars are famous for their (optional) figured maple tops. Some old Gibsons just happened to have them -- most manufacturers are more canny now and put highly figured wood aside, offering it as an extra cost option. Figured veneers are also commonly use on cheaper models.
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I particularly like the saucepan handle - excellent. :)

Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2012 4:10 am
by bulldawg_65
That is fantastic work and a great way to renew old cutlery. Lovely stuff! :D

Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 8:30 pm
by anobium
Pointless saying this,I am sure, but don't put them in the dishwasher. I remember my mother knackering the bone handles on her cutlery when she got a dishwasher.

Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 9:30 am
by JonnyP
We have not got a TV here, let alone a dish washer :D
Thanks for the comments. I did not know wether to put these pics up on here because I sanded the wood, and I know thats frowned upon. I do not sand much these days, but I do like polished up yew, so thats why I did it..

The yew I found out was felled here in Looe, so no chalk around..

Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 2:31 pm
by ToneWood
I use scrapers (more sparingly recently) and sandpaper (as little as possible but I do use it, not on everything though).

I like the look & feel of sanded wood but I'm not a big fan of sanding (dusty, time-consuming, uses consumable sandpaper and removes/reduces the tool marks that I like) but I see that Jogge & Wille Sundqvist (the font of Swedish woodcarving knowledge) both use it - so who am I to judge. Wille even shows the "tool roll" for sandpaper he uses in this book.

I sometimes use my Clifton "cabinet scrapers" (made in Sheffield, England :)):
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- inexpensive, simple & re-usable. :) I use my scraper as they came but if you look on you tube, most professional woodworkers sharpen an angled cutting burr on these and are so able to achieve remarkably smooth finishes - while mine only reduce the more obvious roughness now they've been used a times (i.e. I need to sharpen my scrapers), the finish I get is not the same as you would with sandpaper.

Looking at old film footage on youtube, I notice that some of the old boys just use a piece of broken glass bottle to scrape their axe handles.

No TV, you must get a lot done :). And I suppose there is always youtube/iPlayer/... for the odd occasion when there is something worth watching. Looe reputedly lands the best fish in the country (fresh).

Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 3:20 pm
by gavin
JonnyP wrote: I did not know wether to put these pics up on here because I sanded the wood, and I know thats frowned upon. I do not sand much these days, but I do like polished up yew, so thats why I did it..

Look, if any process works for you - do it! And don't be wary of showing pics of what you have done. This would be a dismal place if all participants held the same views. :D
IMO there are good reasons to rarely use sandpaper - but my opinion is mine. Sandpaper is an easily accessible, cheap and predictable way of finishing work. If someone likes sanded finishes and is making stuff and using their hands - is that not a glorious thing? They may later choose to leave tool marks on their work - The most important thing is that people are encouraged to make, and that as few barriers as possible get in their way - including any feeling that sanded finishes are inferior. The fact that I and probably many other members of this BB don't like sanding is far less important than the fact of someone making something.

So if you want to sand, feel free and don't be shy about sharing what you have done. You may create some new technique we'd all profit by.

Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2012 11:03 pm
by JonnyP
ToneWood wrote:I use scrapers (more sparingly recently) and sandpaper (as little as possible but I do use it, not on everything though).

I like the look & feel of sanded wood but I'm not a big fan of sanding (dusty, time-consuming, uses consumable sandpaper and removes/reduces the tool marks that I like) but I see that Jogge & Wille Sundqvist (the font of Swedish woodcarving knowledge) both use it - so who am I to judge. Wille even shows the "tool roll" for sandpaper he uses in this book.

I sometimes use "cabinet scrapers" (made in Sheffield, England :)):
Image
- inexpensive, simple & re-usable. :) I use my scraper as they came but if you look on you tube, most professional woodworkers sharpen an angled cutting burr on these and are so able to achieve remarkably smooth finishes - while mine only reduce the more obvious roughness now they've been used a times (i.e. I need to sharpen my scrapers), the finish I get is not the same as you would with sandpaper.

Looking at old film footage on youtube, I notice that some of the old boys just use a piece of broken glass bottle to scrape their axe handles.

No TV, you must get a lot done :). And I suppose there is always youtube/iPlayer/... for the odd occasion when there is something worth watching. Looe reputedly lands the best fish in the country (fresh).

Sanding is dusty, and that can be a problem with yew.. I wear a mask when sanding it.
I do get some inspiration (if thats the right word) seeing naturally sanded bits of wood that are washed up on the beach.
I dunno about Looe landing the best fish. I do not eat fish. Maybe its because so many people holiday down here and they eat the fish while relaxed and happy.. Looe does bring in a lot of fish though, and it gets sold in many places.

gavin wrote:
JonnyP wrote: I did not know wether to put these pics up on here because I sanded the wood, and I know thats frowned upon. I do not sand much these days, but I do like polished up yew, so thats why I did it..

Look, if any process works for you - do it! And don't be wary of showing pics of what you have done. This would be a dismal place if all participants held the same views. :D
IMO there are good reasons to rarely use sandpaper - but my opinion is mine. Sandpaper is an easily accessible, cheap and predictable way of finishing work. If someone likes sanded finishes and is making stuff and using their hands - is that not a glorious thing? They may later choose to leave tool marks on their work - The most important thing is that people are encouraged to make, and that as few barriers as possible get in their way - including any feeling that sanded finishes are inferior. The fact that I and probably many other members of this BB don't like sanding is far less important than the fact of someone making something.

So if you want to sand, feel free and don't be shy about sharing what you have done. You may create some new technique we'd all profit by.


Agreed :0)

Re: Been busy in me workshop this evening..

PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 2:28 pm
by ToneWood
Apparently the reason Looe has such a good reputation for fish is to do with the harbor being only big enough for small "day boats". So the fish is landed fresh each day, rather than being iced in the hull of a big factory trawler for several days. If you live near Looe & don't eat fish/seafood, you are missing out. (Can recommend: bass or grey mullet with fennel, garlic and butter or soy sauce, mace, ginger, cider vinegar & lime - my son thought the latter was the best thing he had ever tasted.)

You are probably right about the holiday association. I've managed to live near to the sea for several at different times in my life but I still associate it with holidays & day trips.

I know what you mean about drift wood. I have a piece of drift wood that I use as a mallet (it looks like a truncheon) that I found washed up on the shore in the USA 10 years ago or more. The wood is incredibly hard, dense and smooth.