burr maple quaich

All things bowl turning, hooks, lathes etc..

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

burr maple quaich

Postby robin wood » Wed Nov 04, 2009 4:48 pm

I have just finished three really rather special quaiches.

Image

These are made form burr maple which is a most wonderful wood. It is what most of the original medieval mazer bowls were made from. I love those old bowls and have tried to capture some of their presence in these quaiches. Here is a 13th century mazer from Canterbury.

Image

And another.

Image

And here a close up of one of the quaiches. I have toned the wood slightly with a natural dye to match the colour of the old mazers that I love.

Image

The quaiches are turned green and so move as they dry, the burr wood is quite twisted so the movement can be unexpected. This one ended sitting on a jaunty angle and I am rather fond of it.

Image

These quaiches will be a little dearer than my normal ones when I finally get round to showing them on the website but I think will make a very special present for the discerning whisky drinker.
http://www.robin-wood.co.uk bowls, books and courses
User avatar
robin wood
Regular
 
Posts: 1670
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2006 10:21 am
Location: derbyshire

Re: burr maple quaich

Postby paul atkin » Wed Nov 04, 2009 5:00 pm

lovely work as usual Rob, having shared a tot from one of these at the bb i will say they are an absalute dream to drink from
http://paulatkin.co.uk/




{the one with the pole of glee} morrigan 2008
User avatar
paul atkin
Regular
 
Posts: 587
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2007 12:17 pm
Location: York

Re: burr maple quaich

Postby Raven » Wed Nov 04, 2009 6:20 pm

They look great! How on Earth do you turn them and still keep the handle piece though?
In frith,
Raven
Raven
Regular
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Oct 28, 2009 9:50 pm

Re: burr maple quaich

Postby Ian S » Wed Nov 04, 2009 6:43 pm

Hi Robin

They are just beautiful!
How sharp is sharp enough?
Ian S
Regular
 
Posts: 370
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 8:33 pm
Location: Edinburgh

Re: burr maple quaich

Postby goldsmithexile » Wed Nov 04, 2009 8:38 pm

I love these little forms. Its a turned bowl with carved decoration.....or is it a carved bowll with turned deecoration? :D The combination of the 2 contrasting surface textures works a treat, notwithstanding the figure of the wood itself. Especially the delicate chunky facets on the handles. Nice work.
How do you fit the silver rims? Do you do that while the wood is green, if so does it move with the wood as it dries? Are they glued on somehow? Do you make the silver rims are they spun?
goldsmithexile
Regular
 
Posts: 346
Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2007 4:00 pm
Location: suffolk

Re: burr maple quaich

Postby RichardLaw » Wed Nov 04, 2009 10:48 pm

Wonderful!

Is this Field Maple then, didn't realise it could grow large enough, we just seem to have small ones round here, mind you we have so few veteran trees, I think there must have been a total tree devastation here about a hundred years ago.
User avatar
RichardLaw
Regular
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 10:17 am
Location: Skipton North Yorkshire

Re: burr maple quaich

Postby robin wood » Thu Nov 05, 2009 9:37 am

RichardLaw wrote:Wonderful!

Is this Field Maple then, didn't realise it could grow large enough, we just seem to have small ones round here, mind you we have so few veteran trees, I think there must have been a total tree devastation here about a hundred years ago.


These are quite small only 3-4" diameter bowl and the maple is actually a norway maple burr though field maple does grow big. At Hatfield forest in Essex I know maples over 24" diameter. I think your "tree devastation" happened nearer 1000 than 100 years ago. Yorkshire was inhabited by "Anglo-Scandinavians" and most of the land operated open field farming, that meant no hedges and the woodlands or little scraps of woodland.
http://www.robin-wood.co.uk bowls, books and courses
User avatar
robin wood
Regular
 
Posts: 1670
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2006 10:21 am
Location: derbyshire

Re: burr maple quaich

Postby Graeme Fraser » Fri Nov 06, 2009 12:29 am

Stunning as always Robin! Being Scottish, I've always wanted to carve a quaich although I don't drink. It would be pretty cool to whip a quaich out on a paddling trip together with a bottle of fine malt and pass it round the lads and lasses for a wee sup. Main struggle for me is getting a hold of wood with a big enough diameter for doing quaichs, kuksat, bowls, etc. Plenty spoon crooks and stuff but I always seem to miss out when a tree comes down :( .

I take it the Norway Maple is pretty hard?

Cheers again,
Graeme
Graeme Fraser
Regular
 
Posts: 108
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 5:47 pm

Re: burr maple quaich

Postby robin wood » Fri Nov 06, 2009 1:20 am

goldsmithexile wrote:I love these little forms. Its a turned bowl with carved decoration.....or is it a carved bowll with turned deecoration? :D The combination of the 2 contrasting surface textures works a treat, notwithstanding the figure of the wood itself. Especially the delicate chunky facets on the handles. Nice work.
How do you fit the silver rims? Do you do that while the wood is green, if so does it move with the wood as it dries? Are they glued on somehow? Do you make the silver rims are they spun?


rims are spun by a chap in Sheffield who learned from his uncle 35 years ago, there are not many left. We make the rim and I turn the bowl to fit. I have done them dry but now I always turn them oversize from green wood, it takes a lot of experience to judge just how much oversize so that when it has dried the rim is a tight push fit. The gauge of silver is important too. I want it to be able to move a little with the bowl and follow the slightly eccentric shape the bowl dries to.
http://www.robin-wood.co.uk bowls, books and courses
User avatar
robin wood
Regular
 
Posts: 1670
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2006 10:21 am
Location: derbyshire

Re: burr maple quaich

Postby robin wood » Fri Nov 06, 2009 1:22 am

Red Kite wrote:I take it the Norway Maple is pretty hard?


It is pretty hard but works OK on the lathe. I wouldn't want to carve a big bowl or ladle from it but small stuff is easy enough.
http://www.robin-wood.co.uk bowls, books and courses
User avatar
robin wood
Regular
 
Posts: 1670
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2006 10:21 am
Location: derbyshire

Re: burr maple quaich

Postby Donald Todd » Fri Nov 06, 2009 1:23 am

That surprises me, surely he has to "stretch" them a little to fit.

I have just got a bit of Norway Maple (ø= 7"), supposedly to make carpet skittles but I'm going to try some bowls. I already made 21" legs for a wee table for Mum. It turns beautifully; as White as Sycamore, but with a "creamier" texture.
Attachments
Picture 5.jpg
Norway Maple
Picture 5.jpg (121.85 KiB) Viewed 10583 times
Last edited by Donald Todd on Tue Apr 19, 2011 9:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Donald Todd
Regular
 
Posts: 504
Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2005 10:49 am
Location: Kilspindie, Carse of Gowrie, Scotland (halfway between Perth and Dundee)

Re: burr maple quaich

Postby RichardLaw » Fri Nov 06, 2009 8:52 am

robin wood wrote:I think your "tree devastation" happened nearer 1000 than 100 years ago. Yorkshire was inhabited by "Anglo-Scandinavians" and most of the land operated open field farming, that meant no hedges and the woodlands or little scraps of woodland.


Yes, they were certainly around here as the placenames tell: Skipton, Skibden, River Skirfare. "Sk" tends to be of Norse origin. The woodlands are indeed mainly scraps on land unsuitable for agriculture - mainly in steep stream valleys (ghyls we call 'em, another Norse word) - like Strid Wood where I work. However, there is a c.800 year old veteran oak, The Laund Oak, on the edge of Strid which marks the divide between the forest of Knaresborough (about 20 miles away) and The Forest of Barden (of which Strid is a remnant), so I suspect at some stage there was much more woodland cover than the scraps we now have. The mixture of tree types is pretty poverty striken too - ash, beech, oak, sycamore, alder, bird cherry, birch, rowan predominating. Perhaps it was the mineral extraction around Grassington etc that consumed woodlands for smelting, although there is virtually no coppice either! Ah well, it's grim up North.
User avatar
RichardLaw
Regular
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 10:17 am
Location: Skipton North Yorkshire

Re: burr maple quaich

Postby goldsmithexile » Sat Nov 07, 2009 9:13 pm

LOL Skidby, grimsby, etc all those place names ending in "by" I think it means place? were all setteld by imperialist Viking farmers. Their sea worthy boats were just as efficient sailing up the estuaries of the humber etc as they were battling the north sea. My surname is Skipsey which in norse means boat yard or place of boats. LOL I wear swedish boots, wear swedish coats, I hav a finnish axe...... :lol:
LOL When I moved from "the north" to suffolk, I was spoilt for oaks, they are everywhere even in hedgerows. I could probably count on one hand the number of pine trees around where I live (although there are dozens, hundreds of big ones in thetford forest a bit further north west)
goldsmithexile
Regular
 
Posts: 346
Joined: Mon Nov 19, 2007 4:00 pm
Location: suffolk


Return to Bowl turning

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron