What do you forge your tools on?

All things bowl turning, hooks, lathes etc..

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

What do you forge your tools on?

Postby Stanleythecat » Thu Mar 04, 2010 11:25 am

Hi All

Would be very interested to know what type of forge you employ for smithing your tools, did you make it yourself and was it a scrapheap challenge!

I have just managed to break the tip off one of my bowl hooks and really need to crack on and make a forge. (the hooks were made elsewhere and under tuition... used our own charcoal though!) Had wanted to be low tech at first and smith in the woods with human power and probably will return to that but for now I need to make some tools whilst the knowledge is fresh, especially if I break any more!

Leo
Stanleythecat
Regular
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 4:04 pm
Location: South Glos/ Wiltshire

Re: What do you forge your tools on?

Postby paul atkin » Thu Mar 04, 2010 7:09 pm

Leo look on this site for a simple forge for free, a biscuit tin a few bricks and a vacume blower or a hair dryer will do the job just fine
heres the link
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=719
http://paulatkin.co.uk/




{the one with the pole of glee} morrigan 2008
User avatar
paul atkin
Regular
 
Posts: 587
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2007 12:17 pm
Location: York

Re: What do you forge your tools on?

Postby robin wood » Thu Mar 04, 2010 8:36 pm

Nice job Paul, there is too much mystique about smithing and it puts folk off from having a go. A very simple forge will do the job. I have for most of my turning career borrowed other folks forges, ask around there will be someone within 10 miles of you who has a forge that doesn't get used much. Working museums often are happy for you to come and work a forge. I have forged tools in the fireplace in the front room with an air bed footpump as blower and old tent pole used to take the air into the fire, a big lump of metal from the scrapyard as anvil and you are away. I now use a gas forge which is quick and easy, turn it on and start forging, turn it off and walk away. I would not feel like I had learnt the job if I had not learnt to forge on charcoal or coke though.
http://www.robin-wood.co.uk bowls, books and courses
User avatar
robin wood
Regular
 
Posts: 1670
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2006 10:21 am
Location: derbyshire

Re: What do you forge your tools on?

Postby Stanleythecat » Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:43 pm

Thanks Paul/Robin

Really appreciate hearing from the people who do it.

Just want to get on and have a go really, but you're right in my mind it has grown in to some kind of elusive and expensive monster. After the post I did a bit of googling. So I now have a car wheel, hoping to sit it on a metal bucket (still to get) with a hoover/hairdryer bellows hole in the side and see what happens.

Excellent work with the biscuit tin forge, but surely that is more testament to your talent to adapt your skills?

Leo
Stanleythecat
Regular
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 4:04 pm
Location: South Glos/ Wiltshire

Re: What do you forge your tools on?

Postby arth » Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:47 pm

Maybe a metal watering can will work? Filled up with charcoal and a blower down the spout.
arth
Regular
 
Posts: 148
Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2009 8:49 pm
Location: West Sussex

Re: What do you forge your tools on?

Postby chainsawkid » Sun Mar 14, 2010 12:31 pm

This is what I use with charcoal and it's blooming great! The legs are detachable so it's easy to move around. The old hoover has a variable control on it so you can control the heat easily. The hoover came from feabay for a fiver

Image

CSK :D
James Pumfrey
http://jamesthebowl.blogspot.co.uk/ Turning tales in Sussex
User avatar
chainsawkid
Regular
 
Posts: 82
Joined: Tue Mar 24, 2009 11:40 pm
Location: In my outhouse, Mid Sussex :-)

Re: What do you forge your tools on?

Postby paul atkin » Sun Mar 14, 2010 12:41 pm

CSK that looks great, any chance of a pic from underneath ?????
http://paulatkin.co.uk/




{the one with the pole of glee} morrigan 2008
User avatar
paul atkin
Regular
 
Posts: 587
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2007 12:17 pm
Location: York

Re: What do you forge your tools on?

Postby Stanleythecat » Sun Mar 14, 2010 7:05 pm

And what type of hoover is it! looks quite nice and portable.

Love the forge. Just got hold of nice wheel so great timing for inspiration!

Many thanks

Leo
Stanleythecat
Regular
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 4:04 pm
Location: South Glos/ Wiltshire

Re: What do you forge your tools on?

Postby chainsawkid » Sun Mar 14, 2010 9:40 pm

OK, here's pics of the, what I call the jetplate which is a disc of metal big enough to cover the center of the wheel (and heavy enough to NOT be blown off by the hoover <5mm) with small holes drilled to force air into the hot charcoal.

Image

And here is the underside of the wheel, There are three pieces to the tube, firstly an industrial flange welded to the wheel, and then a 3ish inch piece of steel pipe cut at 45degrees then welded back together to make the right angle then welded to the flange. The handheld vacuum is held to this pipe by two over center clipy things bought from a iron mongers.

Image

You can also see the slightly larger pipes welded to the wheel to take the three removable legs.

The retro hoover is this sort of thing I've just searched for on Fleabay 150421981463

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/vintage-HOOVER-DUSTETTE-Hand-Held-Vacuum-Cleaner-1949_W0QQitemZ150421981463QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK_Vacuum_Cleaners?hash=item2305d94917

All the best

CSK

P.S. Don't ask about the speed control for the hoover, find a n electrician :D
James Pumfrey
http://jamesthebowl.blogspot.co.uk/ Turning tales in Sussex
User avatar
chainsawkid
Regular
 
Posts: 82
Joined: Tue Mar 24, 2009 11:40 pm
Location: In my outhouse, Mid Sussex :-)

Skip forge

Postby Stanleythecat » Thu May 06, 2010 9:47 pm

I was inspired by the simplicity of your forges and finally came up with this...

Have no idea how to upload photos but I'm quite pleased with my new forge setup... it was free!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/49911337@N ... 007012672/

I needed a manual blower as I have no power supply where I forge so I butchered a broken leaf blower and was given a bike... I've cross bred the two to make a pedal powered blower!

The forge is an old car wheel on top of an empty tin of red oxide paint, no welding needed. Its nothing special but as I say it was free and it works!

ps the forge in the photo has an 12v air mattress pump running off my land rover but the new bellows are now plumbed in, :D

Leo
Stanleythecat
Regular
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 4:04 pm
Location: South Glos/ Wiltshire

Re: What do you forge your tools on?

Postby jrccaim » Thu May 13, 2010 4:15 am

I am really impressed by all the cheap and/or free forges. Right now I am using a gas forge; the ingredients are six firebricks (cost USD 30 in Alaska, much cheaper in the lower 48 states); one propane torch (bought on sale at Harbor Freight.com for about USD 15) amd a gas barbecue stand (free, discarded at a remote spot where I walk).

DSCN0137h.JPG
DSCN0137h.JPG (58.42 KiB) Viewed 6903 times


No blower is needed. The gas torch is invaluable. It melts ice in the winter, starts charcoal fires in my hibachi, and flames weeds in the garden (in fact, that's why I bought it). I call it "The Dragon Lady" after the comic strip Terry and the Pirates by Milton Caniff. So one uses what one has. I arrange the bricks according to what I'm doing; in the pic I was forging brackets to reconstitute my porch; the brackets are at the top of the pic. I had to buy the propane tank for the torch as well. Being cautious, I bought it new from Home Depot, don't remember price but not too expensive. I don't know what the situation is in the UK, but here in Willow (not a metropolis!) the local service station sells propane at reasonable prices -- indeed, bush Alaska is propane-fueled. By the way, the purpose of the firebricks is to concentrate the heat. Heat loss through firebricks is minimal. I got this idea from a professional blacksmith up in Talkeetna, 50 Km or so north of here:

smith1h.jpg
smith1h.jpg (31.48 KiB) Viewed 6903 times


At the top of the pic, there is a squarish white area. This is a firebrick house with two open ends and a propane torch feeding it. It is white because the camera was overwhelmed by contrast -- the smith was firing up a piece of steel. Below is a heat-treatment oven. Note the hammer rack at the left! I am green with envy. Behind the whole thing is a power trip hammer. Color me greener.

Still have to admire the charcoal forges shown before.
User avatar
jrccaim
Regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 3:53 am
Location: Willow, Alaska USA


Return to Bowl turning

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron