Bowl lathe #3

All things bowl turning, hooks, lathes etc..

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Re: Bowl lathe #3

Postby Ade Lloyd » Wed Nov 28, 2012 7:39 pm

Cheers James

Exactly the sort of info that was required! I have since been to MERL and taken a few measurements (quite a lot actually until I was told to make an appointment and come back!) of the Lailey Lathe. I do plan to go back though and do a few more detailed sketches and take some proper photos. Do you think I could get away with making the entire lathe out of green oak? Would be a little bit worried about cracking / shrinkage as it seasons but I don't think it will be a major problem.

Many thanks

Ade :D
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Re: Bowl lathe #3

Postby Nunhead Tim » Sun Dec 09, 2012 11:26 pm

Hi Ade,

Just been reading this thread and thought I'd add my two penn'orth. I made my bowl lathe entirely out of green oak and elm. No problems with cracking (but it's smaller dimensions than chainsawkid's beast here 'cos I need to take it apart for storage between use). My uprights were about 5" square. I used mortice and tenon joints, drawbored and pegged together (if it's good enough for a house frame made of green oak...) and the joints are still solid a year later after considerable seasoning. Stupid amounts of work, however.

Best of luck making it. Have fun!

Regards

Nunhead Tim
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Re: Bowl lathe #3

Postby Butterfield » Sun Dec 23, 2012 4:37 pm

Chainsawkid,

Thank you for posting your lathe, I really like the design and will be building something fairly similar soon. I was wondering if you could share a picture with the treadle and pole/bungee setup? Thanks!
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Re: Bowl lathe #3

Postby simon » Sun Dec 23, 2012 9:11 pm

Nunhead Tim wrote:
I used mortice and tenon joints, drawbored and pegged together (if it's good enough for a house frame made of green oak...) and the joints are still solid a year later after considerable seasoning.

I think I understand how drawbored joints work in a building frame but I'm surprised to see them used for somthing that will be knocked down and put up often. When seasoned won't the holes just not line up at all?
Make it, mend it, wear it out,
Make it do or do without.
FB Simon Lamb Green woodwork
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