Show us your bowls

All things bowl turning, hooks, lathes etc..

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby jarrod stonedahl » Wed Apr 18, 2012 2:54 am

been turning lot's of bowls for the summer markets and galleries. got some new pigments in the mail and i like. here's a few.
Image
Image
Image
Image
User avatar
jarrod stonedahl
Regular
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 3:55 am
Location: wisconsin,united states

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby RichardLaw » Wed Apr 18, 2012 5:59 pm

I think those muted earth pigment colours really complement the bowls well. Good stuff.

As a matter of interest Jarrod, how much does a good bowl like those sell for in The States?
User avatar
RichardLaw
Regular
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 10:17 am
Location: Skipton North Yorkshire

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby jarrod stonedahl » Wed Apr 18, 2012 7:54 pm

i'll try to sell these for $45-65 US....they are about 9 1/2" dia...i might be able to get more but it's tough..I got an hour into each (including prep form log and paint), plus i got a smaller one out of the core so 2 for almost 1, from my end. so i think that's a fair price. some will sit around for awhile, but they always sell eventually. thanks for the comments
User avatar
jarrod stonedahl
Regular
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 3:55 am
Location: wisconsin,united states

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby gavin » Thu Apr 19, 2012 6:39 pm

jarrod stonedahl wrote:i'll try to sell these for $45-65 US....they are about 9 1/2" dia...i might be able to get more but it's tough..I got an hour into each (including prep form log and paint), plus i got a smaller one out of the core so 2 for almost 1, from my end. so i think that's a fair price. some will sit around for awhile, but they always sell eventually. thanks for the comments

    Do you sell them while you turn more on the lathe ?
    or are they sitting on a shelf in a shop? i.e. without you to fill out the story
If the latter, you may like to make a small-scale model with some action man or woman doll figure showing how the lathe works. A japanese bowl turner posted some images of his doll-powered bowl-lathe scale-model some years ago on this forum.
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
User avatar
gavin
Regular
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 4:17 pm
Location: Dalbeattie, near Dumfries, Scotland

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby RichardLaw » Thu Apr 19, 2012 6:48 pm

gavin wrote:If the latter, you may like to make a small-scale model with some action man or woman doll figure showing how the lathe works. A japanese bowl turner posted some images of his doll-powered bowl-lathe scale-model some years ago on this forum.


...and maybe one of those jolly plastic model chaps chopping wood, like the bakers kneading bread they used to have in bakers' shop windows some time ago (our kids loved them, but now they are grown up ...).

I really don't see what a model would add, maybe as much as those noisy gadget videos that seem to be in most DIY and kitchen stores these days?

Surely such beautiful bowls speak for themselves.
User avatar
RichardLaw
Regular
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 10:17 am
Location: Skipton North Yorkshire

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby gavin » Thu Apr 19, 2012 9:06 pm

RichardLaw wrote:
gavin wrote:If the latter, you may like to make a small-scale model with some action man or woman doll figure showing how the lathe works. A japanese bowl turner posted some images of his doll-powered bowl-lathe scale-model some years ago on this forum.


...and maybe one of those jolly plastic model chaps chopping wood, like the bakers kneading bread they used to have in bakers' shop windows some time ago (our kids loved them, but now they are grown up ...).

I really don't see what a model would add, maybe as much as those noisy gadget videos that seem to be in most DIY and kitchen stores these days?

Surely such beautiful bowls speak for themselves.

Richard Law suggests such bowls speak for themselves - but that can only be to those who listen.

If you describe, illustrate or demonstrate how a product is made you educate your audience. An educated audience is more likely to perceive value and buy. Anyone interested could make such a model and observe sales results with the model and then without the model. The noisy gadget videos you refer to have the same purpose of gaining attention, educating the audience, and increasing sales. The model does it silently and not dynamically - it is less intrusive.

I found the image:
Image

The rest of the thread is here.
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
User avatar
gavin
Regular
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 4:17 pm
Location: Dalbeattie, near Dumfries, Scotland

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby jarrod stonedahl » Fri Apr 20, 2012 1:06 am

i like that....i got to grow me a top knot! i like where you're going gavin.....but, i won't do that for galleries. i have a nice write up with history,with my reasons for using the pole lathe. but as richard points out i believe the bowl's should stand on there own, pole lathe turned or power lathe turned. At markets and shows are different, that's were i get to interact with folks. nice topic though...many folks who want to be full timers will need to sort all this stuff out. where do you put your energy and focus? how far into marketing do you go? etc...
User avatar
jarrod stonedahl
Regular
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 3:55 am
Location: wisconsin,united states

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby gavin » Fri Apr 20, 2012 6:23 am

jarrod stonedahl wrote:how far into marketing do you go? etc...

It depends what you want. If you want to get somewhere, you make a plan and do it. Clearly the more you study something, the better you'll get: sharpening, carving, sawing, selling...

There is not a maker anywhere who would not like an extra £10 / or $10 per day. But there are many who would prefer not to engage in the conversation about how to get it. Indeed the makers of old did making to earn their living - that was the point of the exercise. The makers here are mostly spared that peril of having to make or starve. Google Barn the Spoon and you'll see someone who has to make or starve, the more so when he is an itinerant pedlar and carving on the street.

What sales results do you want? How much of what product would you like to sell? You then make a plan to achieve those results.
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
User avatar
gavin
Regular
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 4:17 pm
Location: Dalbeattie, near Dumfries, Scotland

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby nic » Fri Apr 20, 2012 10:03 am

We were brainstorming about this over breakfast-

How about getting an action figure with a voice box; with a bit of ingenuity you could get it to accost a punter with ' do you want to buy my bowl?' every time one walks past.

To maximise sales you could dress up in the exact same clothes as the Doll to further reinforce the idea that you are the maker.

Now I realise we are crossing over threads here but I will continue:

Sure my income is dependant on sales but they are good enough at the moment that I wouldn't compromise my personal values for another £10 a day. I would also question whether maximising sales at one show at the risk of alienating potential customers that didn't buy that day is a good idea. I used to watch and (greatly enjoy) the series 'Carnivale ' I picked up the idea of a Fireball show from them; they aimed to extract the maximum money from a town in one night; then they would never dare return. I am not comparing your approach directly to this Gavin but If I was a punter and had been accosted by you two things would happen;

1. I wouldn't buy on principle; whatever you were selling.
2. I would not even look in on the stall next year.

Now I do the same shows year in and year out; often customers buy off me on the second or third year of doing a show. So I think that by ignoring or alienating customers that have no money or are less extrovert than yourself you may affect sales long term. Now my situation is different I don't sell souvenirs and am not aiming directly at tourist market.

I would say though that this is more applicable to the makers of old you are describing- they did not sell souvenirs; people needed what they made. I don't believe that had to actively sell in the same way you are advocating. I think that relegating craft sales to high pressure souvenir sales may not be helpful to the publics perception of what craft makers in the UK actually do.

I've spent to long on this; should be making not typing. :D
nic
Regular
 
Posts: 265
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2011 10:33 am

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby jarrod stonedahl » Tue May 08, 2012 2:38 am

a few new bowls inspired by the other thread on antique Swedish drinking bowls
Image
User avatar
jarrod stonedahl
Regular
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 3:55 am
Location: wisconsin,united states

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby Sharif Adams » Wed May 09, 2012 10:37 pm

Inspired...and inspiring! Very nicely done. Are they birch?
Sharif Adams
Regular
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 9:46 pm
Location: Hertfordshire

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby jarrod stonedahl » Wed May 09, 2012 11:30 pm

yes... all birch, all the time.... til the big pile in front of my shop is all turned up.
User avatar
jarrod stonedahl
Regular
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 3:55 am
Location: wisconsin,united states

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby jarrod stonedahl » Tue May 29, 2012 4:00 pm

since the bowl turning subject seems to be very inactive as of late....I will add a painted bowl, this might be one from the earlier photo
Image
User avatar
jarrod stonedahl
Regular
 
Posts: 145
Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 3:55 am
Location: wisconsin,united states

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby ToneWood » Fri Jun 01, 2012 9:39 am

Hard Sell v. Soft Sell
Gavin & Nic raise some interesting ideas on selling work. I like the Japanese model (pictured above) - children will love it (heck, I like it), which might give parents an opportunity purchase, where previously they might have been dragged past by impatient kids. I don't like hard sell but also I often walked away from stores/sellers where I have been ignored, or where there is nobody around to buy from. So perhaps the best approaches are to be found somewhere in between the 2 extremes. I would suggest making it easy and quick for people to make a purchase - you can always chat afterwards if you both have spare time. Have prices on display, or be available to immediately suggest a price to (or answer questions from) those that look interested.

Product/Price Range
There is probably something to be said for selling products with a range of prices, including smaller, inexpensive items (spoons, spatulas, honey dippers, etc.) as well as larger, perhaps more visually impactful items (bowls, sculpture, etc.). That way you can cater for a wider range of customers/situations & stop yourself getting bored waiting for one major purchase; my wife used to do art & craft shows in the US - it is nice to sell something, anything sometimes. Also one can attract purchasers that might end up also buying the other. We've also bought from and sold to other stall holders.

The long view
Interesting point about customers buying on the 2nd or 3rd (yearly) visit. My wife did an evening class in marketing for small businesses, run by a marketing person from a local newspaper. Apparently it is no good just placing an ad once in a newspaper, people rarely respond to a single placement - maybe second, third,...often sixth placement before it makes a significant impression. Of course, she was also selling newspaper advertising (which was expensive).

Negotiating
Because of my moves across the pond, I had to buy and sell houses and car several times. So eventually I decided to read a book (and listen to a tape) on negotiating. A couple of simple tips from them:
1. win-win should be your goal - there are arguments against this (read the books if interested) but there are better counter arguments. I have experienced both myself. Win-win is the best goal and the best outcome. If not, deals tend to collapse or otherwise go bad. Goodwill can be more valuable than wealth. A good, successful negotiation can be a fun, happy experience for all concerned (that won't always be the case though).
2. Practice (negotiating & selling) inexpensively by taking part in a garage sale (USA)/car boot sale (UK) - as a buyer and as a seller, and haggle. Probably worth doing this as a refresher from time to time - my son did a much better job of this than me last time I tried :D.
ToneWood
Regular
 
Posts: 1846
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 2:21 pm

Re: Show us your bowls

Postby grinagog » Tue Jun 05, 2012 11:09 am

Hi all,
just thought I would show some of my latest works...(getting more into spoons too!)

I also had a nice meeting with a fox just outside my boat and next to my lathe!

As usual I dont get to the internet very easy so replying may take time!

all the best
nick

bowl.jpg
bowl.jpg (133.13 KiB) Viewed 12999 times


bowl-and-spoon.jpg
bowl-and-spoon.jpg (149.13 KiB) Viewed 12999 times


bowl-and-spoon-02.jpg
my first go at chip carving!
bowl-and-spoon-02.jpg (121.81 KiB) Viewed 12999 times


bowls-and-spoons on table.jpg
bowls-and-spoons on table.jpg (219.71 KiB) Viewed 12999 times


fox-and-lathe.jpg
fox-and-lathe.jpg (255.22 KiB) Viewed 12999 times
strive to survive causing least suffering possible
User avatar
grinagog
Regular
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Sun Mar 28, 2010 10:39 am
Location: wiltshire

PreviousNext

Return to Bowl turning

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

cron