Rim-advice

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Rim-advice

Postby dervishcarving » Thu Aug 16, 2012 10:52 am

Good morning all
I haven't been turning bowls (or doing pole-lathe work) for long but enjoy it very much. However, i have problems with the rim of the bowl. Is there any advice on how to get a nice smooth rim (or any profile) without catching the edge and digging the tool in? I watched the Ben Orford videos and the ones by Robin and i can see details on how they do the rim. Any advice would be great
thanks
Dave
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Re: Rim-advice

Postby paul atkin » Thu Aug 16, 2012 11:22 am

Hi i cut my rims working above centre and cutting from the inside towards the outside edge with the end of the hook downwards and take off very fine cuts. Hard to explain but hope this helps
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Re: Rim-advice

Postby gavin » Thu Aug 16, 2012 5:50 pm

Practise.
Just turn practice rims without the fuss of the whole bowl.
I'd suggest you answer these questions ( not on the board but just for yourself)
    Are your hooks sharp?
    Have you put marker pen on your hooks to see where the hook is rubbing or cutting the work?
    Do you look at tool-edges under magnification of 10X or 20X?
    Do you note ( and I mean in writing with measurements) the effect of using a hook up or down?
    Of the hook-tip above or below the turning axis?
    Of the distance from tool rest to rim edge?
    Have you fixed a mirror to the tool rest and shone a beam of light on that to observe how much the tool rest moves under heavy load?
    Or had A N Other observer watch the tool rest to see how much it moves?
    Or seen if the work moves at all?
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Re: Rim-advice

Postby dervishcarving » Thu Aug 16, 2012 7:50 pm

Thanks for teh replies chaps. I will try that Paul, i usualy work from the other side so maybe thats an issue
Gavin... no. no to pretty much all of them. Im a beginner, barely started :) I will improve, i will practice and I do tend to take notes when i get to a certain level of ability to push further. Tools are sharp(ish) but probably need a sharpening. I wil stop by Halfords on the way home tomorrow and get some fresh fine sandpaper
Thanks for the pointers tho, I can see the level you take it to and its reflected in the quality of your work :D
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Re: Rim-advice

Postby gavin » Thu Aug 16, 2012 9:12 pm

dervishcarving wrote: I wil stop by Halfords on the way home tomorrow and get some fresh fine sandpaper


On what surface do you mount the sandpaper? It needs to be inflexible.
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Re: Rim-advice

Postby dervishcarving » Fri Aug 17, 2012 11:00 am

A thin length of wood with smothly rounded sides, as advised by Ben Orford on one of his 'how to' videos
I dont know if a bowl hook tool should be razor sharp or not? Im assuming yes but is that right?
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Re: Rim-advice

Postby gavin » Fri Aug 17, 2012 7:14 pm

dervishcarving wrote:A thin length of wood with smothly rounded sides, as advised by Ben Orford on one of his 'how to' videos
I dont know if a bowl hook tool should be razor sharp or not? Im assuming yes but is that right?

Yes,and keep it as sharp as you can.
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Re: Rim-advice

Postby Sharif Adams » Sun Aug 26, 2012 7:17 am

Hi Dervishcarving, from what I've experienced the most important aspect of turning the rim is to be very steady with the tool. If the tool moves erratically even slightly for a moment, (which can easily happen as you operate the treadle), then it can dig in to the rim. Also, is the tool you're using beveled on the inside or the outside? I have come to find that the inside bevels work best, and that a fairly rough but sharp edge, (as straight from a needle file) can sometimes be better that a finely polished/honed edge, although it will need to be sharpened more often; easy and quick with diamond needle files. I like your burnished elm bowls. Which part of the country are you turning bowls in?
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Re: Rim-advice

Postby dervishcarving » Sun Aug 26, 2012 7:08 pm

I am part of the Dunottar bodgers group (http://dunnottarwoods.org/groups/dbg). Up in the NE of Scotland, Stonehaven.
The last couple of bowls have come out quite well thanks to the advice posted here. Now i am waiting to see how they dry. The last bowl is a little on the thick-side and is warping as it dries. I will know next time, thinner is better
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Re: Rim-advice

Postby Sharif Adams » Mon Aug 27, 2012 8:48 pm

Good to hear it's getting easier. Happy turning!
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