Bike chain bowl lathe

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Bike chain bowl lathe

Postby Robin Fawcett » Mon Jan 12, 2009 11:43 am

I spotted this wacky looking lathe on a page of Don Weber's website about a project he was involved in in Honduras.
http://www.handcraftwoodworks.com/greenwood.html

Can't see how the toolrest works and you wouldn't be able to turn a foot.

Image
http://www.facebook.com/GreenWoodwork?ref=tn_tnmn[url=http://www.treewright.co.uk/]
Green woodwork courses, treen, demonstrations & talks http://www.treewright.co.uk[/url]
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Re: Bike chain bowl lathe

Postby Nicola Wood » Mon Jan 12, 2009 11:57 am

Interesting ... is that giving continuous motion with the lump of wood on the back like a flywheel then?
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Re: Bike chain bowl lathe

Postby Robin Fawcett » Mon Jan 12, 2009 1:17 pm

Yes I think it does give continuous rotation with a 'freewheel' cog from a bike.
http://www.facebook.com/GreenWoodwork?ref=tn_tnmn[url=http://www.treewright.co.uk/]
Green woodwork courses, treen, demonstrations & talks http://www.treewright.co.uk[/url]
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Re: Bike chain bowl lathe

Postby HughSpencer » Mon Jan 12, 2009 5:31 pm

An interesting use of a freewheel. Perhaps one could use an old sharpening stone wheel as a flywheel, that would give dual functionality.
:-)
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Re: Bike chain bowl lathe

Postby robin wood » Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:39 pm

Interesting that Don did that one. They asked me to go out and teach them bowlturning 2 or 3 years ago, when I got all the bumf I declined. It felt rather like the project was only introducing western crafts and industries, even a woodmizer. My problem with this sort of thing is that it is not as empowering as if you find something within the peoples own culture to value then set up production and marketing to help them out. They claimed that there were no crafts of any value in Honduras.
http://www.robin-wood.co.uk bowls, books and courses
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Re: Bike chain bowl lathe

Postby Donald Todd » Thu Sep 03, 2009 12:13 am

My father's built a similar drive using the freewheel action. I can see the return bungee spring in this one, just visible behind the nearer A frame, below the bed. The return only pulls the treadle back, so you get continuous rotation for much less effort once it's going. You do need a flywheel appropriate to the weight of what you are turning. Here the bowl blank will be quite effective as a fly wheel. You can see this one's rather chunky but massive.
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Re: Bike chain bowl lathe

Postby jrccaim » Mon Feb 14, 2011 4:19 am

That is an extremely ingenious adaptation of a bicycle. The pedal reciprocates, thanks to the bungee spring, but the freewheel keps the flywheel spinning. That bicycle lathe is really ingenious. I have a child's bike rescued from scrap for just such a purpose, but have already cut off the pedal so I can put a regular treadle on it. But this project is just in the beginning stage. The reciprocating idea (pedal reciprocates, bungee cord pulls pedal back, flywheel freewheels on return stroke, is very clever. Never would have thought of it. That is why these fora (or forums) are so good.

I have great difficulty figuring out the Honduran lathe. I don't see anything resembling a crank. Flywheel and bike sprocket obvious. As far as I can see (not very) the treadle isn't connected to anything. Must be, of course. Just don't see it from that one picture. Maybe it's connected to the big sprocket -- and that would be your crank if you connect it eccentricaly.

I saw a picture somewhere in my many books of a commercially made 19th century bicycle-type lathe. The pedals were in the middle of the lathe, complete with seat. The pedals turned a shaft which had a sprocket; a chain went to an upper sprocket, the upper sprocket turned the headstock mandrel. Flywheel in there, of course. It wasn't a big lathe as I recall, maybe 15-20 cm center height. If I can track it down I'll post it. I love Victorian era machinery :)
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