See-Sawing

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Re: See-Sawing

Postby jrccaim » Mon Aug 16, 2010 3:14 am

Ken Hume said:

See Saw Margery Daw,
Johnny shall have a new master,
...


I am astounded. I learned that rhyme from my mother (who was from Brooklyn NY) when I was but a wee lad. I had no idea it came from sawing! Much less from a bishop's construction project. Since it was Winchester, would this have anything to do with the current incarnation of Winchester Cathedral? I spent a good two hours admiring that place some years ago. But while I remember the stonework, I do not remember any big wooden beams.
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Re: See-Sawing

Postby Ken Hume » Mon Aug 16, 2010 6:49 pm

Hi JRC,

You cannot see the roof structure from the public area of the cathedral but there is a roof tour that takes place in the afternoon that allows bravehearts to climb to the clerestorey in the Norman (south) wing and then walk along same to the belltower and then along a gangway inside the roof above the nave. If you send me a PM I can reply and send you a *.pdf article file on this very topic.

The cathedral is a development through the ages from Saxon thru Norman to the Gothic period and beyond so the rhyme is not necessarily connected with the cathedral and is thought probably to be more to do with the construction of St Cross Almshouses.

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Ken Hume
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Re: See-Sawing

Postby jrccaim » Tue Aug 24, 2010 3:31 am

Ken Hulme said:

You cannot see the roof structure from the public area....
...

OK, I'll have to learn how to PM! Coming up. Thanks. Fascinating. I never had heard of the St Cross almshouses. The Cathedral itself made it into the big time through a popular song in the 1970s (Winchester Cathedral/ your'e putting me on/ while I stood there watching/ my baby left town...) My son, a professional musician, says he gets requests for the song to this day.
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Re: See-Sawing

Postby Ken Hume » Mon Sep 06, 2010 9:07 am

Hi,

I just spotted some digi pics of Henry Russell demonstrating a frame see sawing technique (treadle sawing ?) at FRAME 2010. See this in the following links to the Carpenters Fellowship website. (Photo credit anon).

http://www.carpentersfellowship.co.uk/gallery/images/frame_2010/hemry_02.jpg

http://www.carpentersfellowship.co.uk/gallery/images/frame_2010/hemry_03.jpg

Looks a bit precarious.

Regards

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Re: See-Sawing

Postby robin wood » Mon Sep 06, 2010 10:15 am

That was fast work I was at Frame and Henry did that Demo on Saturday. It is a small scale traveling set up carried in a Peugeot 205 and he had no idea what timber would be available to demonstrate what until he arrived. Even so he hewed and then sawed the beam lengthways in less than an hour whilst chatting answering questions etc.
http://www.robin-wood.co.uk bowls, books and courses
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Re: See-Sawing

Postby Ken Hume » Thu Sep 09, 2010 8:11 am

Hi,

Following the posting of the above digi pics of Henry Russell sawing at FRAME 2010 on the CF website please note that 2 videos (8mb & 6 mb) showing Henry sawing at this event have now appeared on the web courtesy Kyle Dumka who also attended this event. These can be seen at :-

Henry Russell - Scissor Sawing

In the first video Henry describes the process and set up as "scissor sawing" - a name apparently ascribed by Richard Harris of the Weald & Downland Open Air Museum. Given the unnatural crouching / kneeling position adopted by Henry's assistant it certainly appears that a small pit might help provide the assistant with a more suitable ergonomic stance.

Is this the sawing process that matches up with the shallow woodland saw pits found in the Chilterns and elsewhere ?

The kerf marks left by the saw on the finished piece matches up very closely to those found on historic timber frame surfaces and more especially on relatively short pieces like curved braces which would be almost impossible to see-saw.

Regards

Ken Hume
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Re: See-Sawing

Postby Ken Hume » Sun Sep 19, 2010 7:48 am

Hi,

Another potential use for the woodland pit has now emerged.

D L Bahler has made a post on the Timber Framers Guild forum explaining the construction of a Tjæremile which is a Norwegian Tar making pit that is usually constructed into a hillside in the woodland using a timber pole framework and clay lined wicker infil to form a pit that can be used to decant pine tar from a slow burning heap of timber much in the same way as we make charcoal. In my case no framework is needed since a pit can easily be dug out of the hillsdie using cut and fill to make an even edged pit.

He has posted some photos of his prototype his Tjæremile at :-

http://www.tfguild.org/forums/ubbthread ... #Post24419

Could this be another possible explanation for woodland pits ?

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