Rake Maker

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Re: Rake Maker

Postby arth » Thu Jul 07, 2011 9:09 pm

I think this has been posted before, but worth looking how this man on the Out of Town series makes rakes.

Starts about 3mins in
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gaolgMIKIZk

part 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WiJPX2v_ ... re=related
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Re: Rake Maker

Postby 81stBRAT » Fri Jul 08, 2011 3:00 pm

Using square pegs in a round hole fixes them securly and they do not drop out whilst in work.
5 old rakes (50 years plus old) I have aquired or belong to brother next door have square pegs, never seen and old one with round pegs.
The rake I made in the 80's and used most years in the hay field has never dropped a peg.
Image off peg and tool for rounding top.
Rakes from these parts have willow heads and ash handles.
Arth you live quite near if you ever come this way Herstmonceux call in and have a look.
[url]Image[/url]

The shoulder on the peg acts as a taper that is what I belive holds the peg very secure, dont take much time to make on the horse
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Re: Rake Maker

Postby arth » Fri Jul 08, 2011 3:21 pm

81stBRAT wrote:Arth you live quite near if you ever come this way Herstmonceux call in and have a look.


The shoulder on the peg acts as a taper that is what I belive holds the peg very secure, dont take much time to make on the horse
Richard


Yes I would love to have a look. Something else to experiment with.
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Re: Rake Maker

Postby Brian Williamson » Sat Jul 09, 2011 8:42 am

81stBRAT wrote:Using square pegs in a round hole fixes them securly and they do not drop out whilst in work.
Rakes from these parts have willow heads and ash handles.
Richard


More interesting stuff. I wonder if the willow helps by letting the harder wood of the pegs 'bite' more easily into the softer wood of the head?

Richard, are you using ash for the pegs? The wood in your photo looks quite dark.

I'm going to have to look twice at all the old rakes I see. I would have said that I've never seen a square pegged rake. So either I just haven't noticed or maybe it's a regional/locality thing.

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Re: Rake Maker

Postby Brian Williamson » Sat Jul 09, 2011 9:02 am

Just watched the 'Countryman' video again (thanks, Arth).

When John Sims is making his tines, he's knocking them through the tine-die so that they come out round, but when he comes to knocking them into the head you can see (if you look closely) that he's flattened two (I think only two) opposite sides so that they have a long and a short axis. Something of a hybrid between square pegs and oval pegs.

Courtesy of the 'edit' facility I've looked yet again and now I'm sure that he has squared them!

I'm still not sure of what the water does though. Maybe it's just a lubricant.

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Re: Rake Maker

Postby 81stBRAT » Sat Jul 09, 2011 9:39 am

Yes Brian all my pegs are ash also on the old rakes.
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Re: Rake Maker

Postby arth » Sat Jul 16, 2011 7:32 pm

I went to The museum of Rural Life today had a good look at the rakes.
At least two I could see had square tines. I couldn't have a look at the rest as they hang from the ceiling and could not see the top of the heads.


Image

Image
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Re: Rake Maker

Postby steve tomlin » Tue Aug 09, 2011 11:35 pm

They're normally pretty helpful at MERL, if you ring ahead and make an appointment they'll let you get up close to look at things. From memory, these tines are round when they go through the head.

Here's my first rake, a double bow all in ash

Image
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Re: Rake Maker

Postby Brian Williamson » Sat Aug 13, 2011 6:07 pm

Looks really good Steve, well done. How did you find the bending of the bows? I've only made one, single, bow rake and a had a lot of trouble with the bow.

Tried putting the rod through a rounding plane or a large dowel plate, but neither gave me good results. Tried using it in the round (debarked) and did a little better, but they all wanted to crack. Does the trouble lie in using small diameter ash? It may be flexible out of older wood, but very small rods seem to be naturally brittle. Did you use ash? Hazel?

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Re: Rake Maker

Postby steve tomlin » Sun Aug 14, 2011 9:18 pm

The bows are ash, cleft from large diameter logs and then drawknifed down close to size before putting through a dowel plate. Didn't have any trouble bending them, no failures - it's a very gentle curve.
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Re: Rake Maker

Postby mallery » Sun Aug 28, 2011 9:53 pm

Hi,

I was just thinking about the bows recently when making some rakes. I make my bows from fresh hazel in the round as I was taught by my Dorset guru but I have to work the bend in gradually over my knees or you will be very lucky to make the bend without a break. It only takes a few minutes.

http://woodlandantics.wordpress.com/2011/08/21/making-more-rakes/

Unaware of square tines - but then I never thought to look. I always shave two opposite faces of the tines before banging into the head,

cheers

Mark
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Re: Rake Maker

Postby hedger16 » Wed Aug 31, 2011 10:07 pm

Here is a picture of a small rake i made for raking my seedbeds on my allotment it is
Made of Ash.With Birch tines. sorry about the picture.
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Re: Rake Maker

Postby Brian Williamson » Sun Sep 11, 2011 5:20 pm

I managed a very quick look at the four rakes on display at St Fagans Museum when I was over there for the Carpenters Fellowship Frame event the other weekend. Didn't have the time to look at any that they may have in storage, unfortunately.

The one thing that struck me very forcefully was how light, even delicate, they were.

So, two thoughts.

Were they presentation rakes given to mark a farm-workers retirement? Seems an unlikely thing to happen and to have four together would be a ridiculous coincidence.

Was raking an art form now completely lost? I know that if I was trying to use them round my garden they wouldn't last long. I'd soon snag a root or a stone and break them. But if you were raking a field that was regularly grazed and cut for hay the worst thing that you might find would be a mole hill. There shouldn't be any problem with brambles etc growing out of the hedge or broken wood underneath it. When I started farming, the first cut that I made would be the 'wrong' way round, with the tractor running against the hedge and the mower away from it. That way you would spot branches, wire and other nasties befor they got into the mower. You could turn round and mow the ground you had just driven over after you knew it was clear. Similarly you could send the boy round the field edge with the heavy rake to make sure that there was nothing to snag the light-weight rakes.

Rake the grass, boy, not the ground.

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Re: Rake Maker

Postby steve tomlin » Sun Sep 11, 2011 11:10 pm

I've just been in Transylvania, taking part in a Haymaking Festival. We spent an afternoon with the man who makes and repairs the hayrakes that everyone uses. They are also, by comparison with the rakes you see commercially made over here, delicate. There are 19 tines, each with an 8mm tenon. I worked with a rake that had been in use for 20 years. The tines had been worn down but only one had been broken in that time. I agree with you that a haymeadow shouldn't have anything in it to snag a rake but also that raking is a skilled job. More about the rakemaker here

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Re: Rake Maker

Postby Brigstock Bodger57 » Wed Nov 23, 2011 9:50 pm

Have only just watched the film of Trevor and having done shows with him all through the 90's it was sad to see him like that. I knew he had died but didn't know of the film, which I watched with interest as he always talked of his workshop but I never knew it was like that. I now see why he was upset that he didn't think any one would take it over when he had to retire. I now regret that we bought his rakes as presents for other people but never got one for ourselves.
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