Rake Maker

For all those other associated crafts.

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

Re: Rake Maker

Postby RichardLaw » Thu Dec 15, 2011 11:33 pm

Did nobody see the rake making on A Victorian Farm Christmas?

It broke the first time it was used, dear me. Bad press for hay rakes, and a very scanty coverage of how they are made. It would, I surmise , have been clearer why the rake failed if we'd seen the stayl made, looked the same diameter all the way down to the head. I seem to remember them swelling, nay, even going square down there, or do I misremember?
User avatar
RichardLaw
Regular
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 10:17 am
Location: Skipton North Yorkshire

Re: Rake Maker

Postby Brian Williamson » Fri Dec 16, 2011 10:03 am

Thanks for the tip-off Richard. Just been to have a look.

Not really very informative on rake making; rather a cursory glance at the subject (I did discover that all greenwood workers were called Bodgers, though, and heard a rather bizarre reason as to why).

They made a 14 tine, bow headed rake with a (seemingly) grown handle, though as Richard noticed there was little or no taper on it. The rake broke where the bow was drilled through the handle, which suggests poor technique might have been the problem rather than poor materials/workmanship, although the relatively small diameter of the handle at the point of drilling would have rendered it vulnerable to lateral stresses. There also seemed to to be a shouldered tenon where handle met head. Not a technique I like, as it doesn't allow for any flexing at the joint to absorb stresses.

We didn't see it break, so we'll never know why, and the chap who was raking with it initially seemed to be using it quite well. Perhaps he didn't impart his knowledge to his successor.

Brian.
http://www.westcountrycoppice.co.uk

undergreenwood.wordpress.com

'Measure twice and cut once'
User avatar
Brian Williamson
Regular
 
Posts: 344
Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2009 11:33 am
Location: Stroud, Glos..

Re: Rake Maker

Postby Brian Williamson » Fri Jun 15, 2012 11:12 am

There's an interesting post under 'Tools' by 81stBRAT that warrants inclusion here. If I can find a way of copying it across I will. Or post a link.

Or could somebody more able do it for me?

Brian.
http://www.westcountrycoppice.co.uk

undergreenwood.wordpress.com

'Measure twice and cut once'
User avatar
Brian Williamson
Regular
 
Posts: 344
Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2009 11:33 am
Location: Stroud, Glos..

Re: Rake Maker

Postby RichardLaw » Fri Jun 15, 2012 2:13 pm

Here you go - just copied it all:

81stBRAT wrote:Just a thought on this subject, why buy a tine cutter for £40 when it is very easy to make tines on a shave horse, and use an easy made tool to round the ends off to fit the hole drilled in the rake head.
A few images to illustrate this process.
[urlImage][/url]
[url][/uImagerl]
[url]Image[/url]
[urlImage][/url]
1 Tine cleft and some shaved.
2 Tool
3 Toll in use
4 Fitted to a trill head note taper at head entry locks tine sold no pussing through in use and they dont dry and fall out.
There has been a topic (Artist or Craftsman/Woman) My thoughts tines bashed through a tine cutter is heading towards manufactoring .
Those that made/ make a living from rake makeing used round tines, easy to makewith machinery and quick.
Therefore has everybody who sets out to make a rake today been influenced by this? and has never considered making tines on a horse? All the old rakes I have. Pre 1950 have Sq tines made on a horse, why did these craftsmen not use a tine cutter? Square tine stronger look better?
Richard
User avatar
RichardLaw
Regular
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 10:17 am
Location: Skipton North Yorkshire

Re: Rake Maker

Postby 81stBRAT » Fri Jun 15, 2012 7:12 pm

Hi Brian
Have done a quick measure on one of my tines all will vary a bit,13mm dia one the round shank, 14 mm on the shoulder formed in the rounder. That comes out at 16% if I have done the summs right. Using willow for the head, knocking the tine in, willow being easily compressed the shoulder goes into the head,
this may or maynot make these tines stronger at this point? Breakages of tines are no dout the result of snagging, so angle of tine relative to the ground would play a part in tine strength. Rakes I find are easier to use at shallow angle just glides over the ground,less snagging.
Richard
81stBRAT
Regular
 
Posts: 118
Joined: Thu Feb 24, 2011 5:56 pm
Location: Herstmonceux East Sussex

Re: Rake Maker

Postby RichardLaw » Fri Jun 15, 2012 8:31 pm

I would think square tines would be stronger because presumably they would be split out and then shaved along the grain.

Round bashed out ones will tend to ignore the grain to some extent (I guess they must still have been split out?).

But then what do I know about it?
User avatar
RichardLaw
Regular
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 10:17 am
Location: Skipton North Yorkshire

Re: Rake Maker

Postby RichardLaw » Sat Jun 16, 2012 9:10 am

Brian asked me how I copied the post by Richard from the Tools thread to this one. In case this happens to be useful to anyone else I'm posting my method here:


Here's what I did to get that post through to the thread on rakes.

Found the post you mentioned.

Pressed the "Quote button (It's in red at top right of all posts).

This puts all the post by 81stBRAT into a potential response post by me.

Instead of adding something to the quote and posting a reply, I highlighted the quoted content and did a copy. I use a keyboard shortcut to do this, and I use a MAc computer so I pressed Apple and C keys. On a Windoze computer that would be press the control key and the C key. The content of 81stBRAT's post is now in the clipboard of my computer and I can paste it where ever I like.

I pressed the back button/arrow in my browser to go back to the rake thread, pressed the Postreply button (bottom left) and pasted the stuff from the computer's clipboard into my reply. On a Mac I pressed Apple and the V key together to paste. On a Winsleep computer it's Control key with the V key. Hey presto - the post appears in my new reply and I add a bit of text at the top to show how clever I am (not!).

There may well be other methods, I'm just a dwarf standing on Tin Berners-Lee's (amongst millions of others') shoulders.

.. maybe there's a better place on the forum for these instructions ... if you think so try my method to copy it across .. it's not rocket science Mark.
User avatar
RichardLaw
Regular
 
Posts: 570
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 10:17 am
Location: Skipton North Yorkshire

Re: Rake Maker

Postby Brian Williamson » Sun Jun 17, 2012 5:30 am

RichardLaw wrote:I would think square tines would be stronger because presumably they would be split out and then shaved along the grain.

Round bashed out ones will tend to ignore the grain to some extent (I guess they must still have been split out?).


Both would be split out to start with, so no difference there. Both shaving and bashing would ignore the grain to an extent, but if the grain was straight to begin with then that would make no difference either.

The difference in size would make a difference (area increasing according to the square of the radius) and it probably would be significant, albeit small. This effect might only occur in willow heads though, which, as Richard says, is a soft enough wood to deform and accept the extra size of the taper. Ash, being harder, mightn't work like this?

Brian.
http://www.westcountrycoppice.co.uk

undergreenwood.wordpress.com

'Measure twice and cut once'
User avatar
Brian Williamson
Regular
 
Posts: 344
Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2009 11:33 am
Location: Stroud, Glos..

Re: Rake Maker

Postby ToneWood » Wed Jun 20, 2012 11:04 pm

Roy Underhill, on The Woodwright's Shop on PBS in America, making a hickory rake: http://www.pbs.org/woodwrightsshop/video/3100/3103.html
(Felt sorry for the camera man when he started swinging that axe). Lots of interesting stuff, inc. froeing, in cannel & out cannel gouges, dowel plates, hickory v ash, nose/shell auger, etc.

Recent dowel-plate discussion: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2383

robin wood wrote:Having worked alongside Trevor at many shows over the years I find it quite disturbing to see him in such a sad state of health. This was filmed as his Motor Neurone Disease was setting in and his speech and movement all but gone. There surely can be no worse end for a craftsman than having your body shut down whilst your brain remains intact. ...
I was deeply shocked and saddened when I recently saw footage of top US mountaineer & ice climber Jeff Lowe (a hero of mine) on youtube. He too has been severely struck down by a similar type of illness - although his diagnosis has changed several times. However, he looks remarkably happy and fulfilled - at least while the cameras were rolling. While healthy, he used his faculties to the absolute fullest possible while he could (he climbed the North Face of Eiger direct 20 years ago, climbed grade VIII ice in the early 1990s, wrote the bible on modern ice climbing, etc.). There is a film of his exploits on the Eiger coming out this year, Metanoia, (trailers on youtube), it looks like an amazing film.

e.g.
Jeff Lowe's Metanoia - narrated by Jon Krakauer
Jeff Lowe Opens his Backpack after 20 years Frozen in Ice
Scenes from the making of Jeff Lowe's Metanoia
http://jeffloweclimber.com/
Last edited by ToneWood on Sun Jul 01, 2012 10:16 am, edited 1 time in total.
ToneWood
Regular
 
Posts: 1846
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 2:21 pm

Re: Rake Maker

Postby 81stBRAT » Sat Jun 30, 2012 7:58 pm

Hi
Just obtained this image, printed on Friday July 2nd 1943.
who has the best eyesite Square or round tines?
Richard
[url]Image[/url]
81stBRAT
Regular
 
Posts: 118
Joined: Thu Feb 24, 2011 5:56 pm
Location: Herstmonceux East Sussex

Re: Rake Maker

Postby mstibs » Sun Jul 01, 2012 6:26 pm

Today I got a long time promised tool from an old farmer from the eastern Ore Mountains (grandfather of my brother in law). He used it all the years to make rake teeth from split ash with a simple plane.

It's a planed oak or ash plank/piece with excavations that should have the length of the rake teeth chiseled in. Two rectangular holes have a different width and different depths at front and rear. The third excavation is triangular.

Step by step you can plane rectangular rake teeth this way. The third triangular excavation is used to hold the tooth for slightly planing its edges that you get an octagonal result. As it seems, the tool is for teeth of 12 mm holes with about 14mm top diameter.

On to the pictures:
top-view.JPG
The round holes are used to fix the tool to the bench with a dowel and hang it to a nail on the wall. And there's a first tooth, proudly produced by me (no ash, just some wood I had laying around).
top-view.JPG (121.42 KiB) Viewed 10690 times

perspective.JPG
Perspective view
perspective.JPG (102.57 KiB) Viewed 10690 times

full-view.JPG
Full view of the excavations. The different length is not explainable for me - I guess it's done "good enough".
full-view.JPG (98.18 KiB) Viewed 10690 times

width.JPG
On to sizes: width ...
width.JPG (218.78 KiB) Viewed 10690 times

front-depth.JPG
... front depth ...
front-depth.JPG (201.81 KiB) Viewed 10690 times

rear-depth.JPG
... and rear depth.
rear-depth.JPG (151.18 KiB) Viewed 10690 times


Sizes are metric btw.

Best!
STIBS
Saxons. Were good wood-turners, they had to be because they were poor potters...from "A Short History of Woodturning with the Pole-lathe" by Brian G. Howarth; My bilingual (de/en) Blog: http://mstibs.wordpress.com
User avatar
mstibs
Regular
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Dresden/Saxony/Germany

Re: Rake Maker

Postby jrccaim » Wed Jul 25, 2012 3:33 am

Very interesting, mstibs. What you have there is called a jig in English. (Confusingly this is also the name of a dance rythm (no doubt from Fr. " Guige")and J.S. Bach himself wrote a "Jig Fugue". If you google on that you will even find YouTube performances). The device might also be called a fixture and the distinction is blurred in English. I call it a jig. It does the dimensioning and holds the piece fixed while you work on it. I have taken note of your jig. I might add a spokeshave would work faster than a plane. Yrsterday I wrote a longish post about rakes. Seems to have disappeared. Oh well. Some other day.
User avatar
jrccaim
Regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 3:53 am
Location: Willow, Alaska USA

Re: Rake Maker

Postby 81stBRAT » Fri Aug 24, 2012 8:01 pm

Had a rare order for a Rake this was the result
Ash handle from cleft 6" piece ready for draw knife.
Image
Useing rounders to get size down
Image
Image
Image
Bucket of pegs
Image
Willow head drilled and handle split, handle sraighten by steaming and manipulation in a break found it very difficult to make a big enough curve on the split portion, needs a jig made for this bit
Tines fitted
Image
Image
Tines trimed to lenght and angled on front side

Image
Rake finished
Image
Tools used
Image

Richard
81stBRAT
Regular
 
Posts: 118
Joined: Thu Feb 24, 2011 5:56 pm
Location: Herstmonceux East Sussex

Re: Rake Maker

Postby 81stBRAT » Tue May 21, 2013 8:02 pm

Going to the Bodgers Ball set me off on the task of making a Buck Rake 6ft wide 28 tines, this one all ash. old ones had willow handles to make them lighter, no suitable willow so ash it had to be. Had to steam the head piece to make it straighter, very lucky all the tines lined up

Image
just shows what you can do with a scaffold board.
Handle was a bit tricky as it had to be bent in two directions
Image
The rig I made up took a great deal of time now dismantled maybe to be used again.
This may be the first Buck Rake made in 60 odd years, unless anybody knows different?
Image
Image
Entered in the Agriculture tool/implement category at the ball did not come anywhere, this category was won by a beautifully made Childs wheelbarrow, can't quite work out how this item was in the AG tool/implement cat, wonder what the stockman of old would have said when given a Childs barrow to muck out their beast "!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"
Richard
81stBRAT
Regular
 
Posts: 118
Joined: Thu Feb 24, 2011 5:56 pm
Location: Herstmonceux East Sussex

Re: Rake Maker

Postby Tom B » Thu May 23, 2013 8:18 pm

That's really beautiful. I make the odd bit of loose hay and could use something like that...

Would their traditional use be to collect windrowed hay?
I can't quite make out from the photos, what angle the bent handle is to the tines, as I imagine it would be quite critical?
Tom B
Regular
 
Posts: 43
Joined: Wed Jun 04, 2008 3:00 pm
Location: Liverpool

PreviousNext

Return to Greenwood crafts

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron