a poor replica

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a poor replica

Postby Paul Thornton 2sheds » Sat Mar 10, 2012 10:44 pm

this spoon really caught my eye and appealed to me on a family day out to St fagans last weekend:

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i thought i would try to replicate it:

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this is about 7 inches long, unfortunately i think the handle is a bit heavy and it has less appeal because it does not (yet) have the patina caused by years of use. i do like this bowl shape, pefect for "slurping" cawl.
i do not know but i am currently assuming that the more wealthy in society had spoons with turned handles and the poorer carved spoons. i draw this conclusion because of the ammount of time (& extra effort & work) it took to make compared with a carved spoon. (this spoon is made in one plane, the first attempt with the centres offset came loose and fired itself across the yard landing in a bunch of filfth. i have not entirely got my head round the offset).

i would really like to make 4 or 6 all matching to go in a rack. we'll see. i filled out the rest of the afternoon carving a 6 inch hazel eater for my boy and a slightly larger eater from cherry:

Image

critique more than welcome. photos taken with a mobile telephone so sorry about the quality.

Paul
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Re: a poor replica

Postby bulldawg_65 » Sun Mar 11, 2012 5:16 am

Now that I have seen the original, are you sure it was turned? I've seen some carved handles that come out that round. The end of the handle is what has me thinking it might be carved. Of course you saw the original so you'd be the one to say one way or the other... I wish I'd be able to look at a larger version of that spoon. :)
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Re: a poor replica

Postby SeanHellman » Mon Mar 12, 2012 7:07 pm

Nice spoon you are copying Paul, and great first attempt. As you say it is a bit chunky, that handle can be a lot thinner, also the original spoon on the end of the handle has a flat cut off and not a rounded end. How flat this is I can not tell, but I would make it as a slight dome, a rounded end has no elegance. I would also love to be able to see a side view of the spoon, any chance of a repeat visit with you camera? Make another 20 and you should have cracked the design. This is the only way to improve, but I do not need to tell you that.
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Re: a poor replica

Postby Paul Thornton 2sheds » Mon Mar 12, 2012 10:21 pm

SeanHellman wrote:Nice spoon you are copying Paul, and great first attempt. As you say it is a bit chunky, that handle can be a lot thinner, also the original spoon on the end of the handle has a flat cut off and not a rounded end. How flat this is I can not tell, but I would make it as a slight dome, a rounded end has no elegance. I would also love to be able to see a side view of the spoon, any chance of a repeat visit with you camera? Make another 20 and you should have cracked the design. This is the only way to improve, but I do not need to tell you that.


happy to oblige Sean. this is the best side view i could get, the museum has a very "hands off our stuff" policy especially on weekends, (especially when your have 2 kids in tow, (bethan kept getting moved on because she sat on every stool/chair simply to appreciate them))they tell me a mid week visit with prior arrangement with their conservation team and many many more spoons are revealed for an upclose and personal experience. st fagan s has a huge collection of spoons, until 4 or 5 years ago they were on display in the traditional museum setting, now they have turned the museum part into "galleries" with little on display.

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of all the spoons i saw this one had the "sex appeal", slender, refined and almost dianty.
i have not recreated any of those factors. not in my first or in any of the 3 others i made. i got kind of stuck with the form i first made. also the lathe felt rather a clumsy device to use to make the handle much thinner but as you say thats practice. i am please with the copy work, the repitition and similarity between them all though.
again i was rushing, i had a window of time and a plan i wanted to achieve, i had a back garden to prep for turfing and a few hours on the yard playing spoony before the wife and kids got back from a weekend away and i had it in my head i wanted 4 cawl spoons (1 each) in a rack (which i split drilling the 4th hole, thus only its only a 3 holer) by the time they returned.

Image

i know that i really should stop living in a rush, slow down and concentrate on quality. trying to achieve too much in too little time is a definite weakness in my psyque - one born of a hectic work and family life. one day i'll grow up, chill out and calm down.
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Re: a poor replica

Postby Wiffa1 » Tue Mar 13, 2012 7:04 pm

[/attachment]
Found these two spoons in North Staffordshire recently which seem to have been made in a very similar way. the bowls seem to be carved but the handles are turned
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DSCF1797.JPG (28.97 KiB) Viewed 2758 times
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DSCF1809.JPG (65.27 KiB) Viewed 2758 times
DSCF1804.JPG
DSCF1804.JPG (53.87 KiB) Viewed 2758 times
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