The book of Sloyd / small sloyd (craft) projects

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The book of Sloyd / small sloyd (craft) projects

Postby ToneWood » Tue Feb 12, 2013 9:05 pm

A couple of links on Sloyd:

1. Roy Underhill on the Woodwrights Shop, PBS.org: "Who wrote the book of Sloyd".

2. The original book of "sloyd models", in various electronic forms, including .pdf, Kindle and view in browser: A text book of working drawings of models in sloyd (1893) by Gustaf Larsson.

Model #9 - fish line winder. Several years ago, out of necessity, I made several "fish line winders" of my own (v. similar) design, in several sizes, for holding float-lines for spearfishing and for hand-lines, with fishing line and mackerel feathers/trolling lures/jigs, to be used from a kayak/boat (they work :)). Made in different sizes they can also be used for storing electric cables, anchor ropes for kayaks, tow-ropes, strimmer/weed-whacker line, cord, string, rope, chain, kite-lines, etc.

Can be v. simple. I've made several that are longer versions of this antique/vintage one:
Image
http://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/10819391 ... ref=market

This antique(?) winder is similar to some of the bigger winders I've made for float-lines & anchor line):
Image
http://www.etsy.com/listing/110878752/a ... amp-wooden
More antique winder designs here: http://antiqueauctionsnow.net/ol/yarn-winder

Model #26 - a scoop, strikes me as rather nice, with a curved handle. I was planning to make a small scoop for handling bird seed, although somewhat simpler in design. Handily, featured here The Wisdom of Hands too from another v. old sloyd book:
Image

3. Sloyd Paper knives: http://jeffpeachey.com/category/craft/page/3/
Image
Schwartz, Everett. Sloyd Educational Trainning Manual . N.P.:Educational Publishing Company, 1893.
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Re: The book of Sloyd

Postby ToneWood » Sun Mar 17, 2013 8:00 pm

Well, my scoop isn't as elegant as that one but I did manage to make my bird seed scoop today. Although I managed to break the hard-to-find blade on my beloved 12" wooden bow saw in the process :(.

I made the initial scoop with my little 5cm/600g HK adze and HK bowl gouge:
Scooped scoop + gouge.jpg
Notice that I did not split the blank to remove the pith as I would normally do. The HK bowl gouge was the key tool for this - a real joy to use :)
Scooped scoop + gouge.jpg (87.1 KiB) Viewed 17735 times


Unfortunately the scoop was too long for the task, so I had to shorten it and then cut the scoop back deeper into the handle - my old Ashley Illes curved gouge & HK spoon knife both proved useful for this (the bowl gouge & adze being too wide).

Seed scoop small.jpg
The scoop works well.
Seed scoop small.jpg (73.37 KiB) Viewed 17732 times
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Re: The book of Sloyd

Postby ToneWood » Sun Mar 17, 2013 9:31 pm

Just found the link to Robin Wood's article featuring his rather more elegant cereal spoon/scoop. Hope he won't mind if I link to his picture here - its a lovely spoon, which probably influenced me as much as the sloyd scoop above:
Image
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Re: The book of Sloyd

Postby ToneWood » Sat Mar 23, 2013 8:00 pm

I spent some time on the scoop today. I enlarged the hook, carved the head down some and added a thumb indent.
I couldn't find my "cabinet" scrapers but this is probably too small & too difficult to hold for scraping anyway, so I sanded it.
Scoop - dry 2.jpg
Scoop - dry 2.jpg (36.54 KiB) Viewed 17661 times

I was going to carve a shield pattern above the thumb indent but it looked "too busy" when penciled on, so I just carved another indent the same shape as the pattern would have been (below).
Thought I had finished but looking at the images, I see the back needs re-sanding to remove smeared wood-glue & "grain checkering" on the bottom of the bowl (not sure sure if there is much I can do about that - perhaps when it's drier?).

Looks rather duck-like - I guess that's not entirely inappropriate for a bird-seed scoop :)
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A simple sloyd project? A Bottle-cap Fish Descaler

Postby ToneWood » Sun May 26, 2013 7:29 am

I have been on the look-out for simpler projects. A few years ago I was given a metal fish de-scaler/"scaler" as a present and I must admit, it does the job better than the back of a knife: faster & more thorough. For reference, here is a popular metal descaler & commercial wooden scaler :
Image Image
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B000 ... rious02-21
http://www.sourcingmap.com/kitchen-wood ... 91327.html

I saw a homemade fish-scraper/-scaler/-descaler pictured in Hugh Fernley-Wittingstall's "Fish" book. It was wooden & hand-carved. It had a large, broad head with lots of beer-bottle caps screwed to one side for scraping and a nicely shaped, carved wooden handle with a lanyard threaded through a couple of large holes at the end of the handle (it was used on-board a fishing boat).
Fish-scale scraper - with lanyard not oiled.jpg
Smaller & simpler than HF-W's and, unlike metal descalers, this one floats.
Fish-scale scraper - with lanyard not oiled.jpg (118.02 KiB) Viewed 16222 times


Fish-scale scraper - saw & paddle.jpg
I found a small sliver of left-over ash, penciled in a paddle shape - big enough to hold 6 bottle-caps (2 or 3 might be enough) - which I cut out using my vintage 10" wooden bow-saw. I used a small axe to tidy the edges, a spoke-shave to flatten the paddle & finally a knife to refine the shape. Then I sanded it.
Fish-scale scraper - saw & paddle.jpg (100.01 KiB) Viewed 16222 times
Fish-scale scraper - tacking bottle caps to paddle.jpg
I planned to use small screws to attach the bottle caps to the paddle but came across these cool retro "made in England" Bayonet steel tacks (carpet tacks?) in the local hardware store. It is a little tricky to hold & hammer such tiny nails but they hold much better than I expected - just the job! I used the pein of a ball-pein hammer to finish knocking them in.
Fish-scale scraper - tacking bottle caps to paddle.jpg (69.83 KiB) Viewed 16222 times
Scaled fish descaler with filleting knife.jpg
You can decorate it if you like. I used the little elm-handled Ben Orford knife to cut the 3-D scale effect (Wille Sundqvist suggests using a curved-tip knife for carving decorative curves). The background is my fish-processing cutting board/knife box. The longer knife is a 40+ year old Finnish Rapala Marttiini filleting knife.
Scaled fish descaler with filleting knife.jpg (70.53 KiB) Viewed 16177 times

FishBoardScaler.jpg
Field testing.
FishBoardScaler.jpg (86.77 KiB) Viewed 15209 times
FishScaler.jpg
It was effective at removing scales. Which made me realise that a very effective fish cleaner could be made with even fewer bottle caps: 3, 2 or perhaps even just 1 bottle cap. A design flaw was immediately apparent though: the scales stuck between the bottle caps, making it hard to clean the tool afterwards. An improved design would use fewer caps and leave gaps between the caps to ease cleaning.
FishScaler.jpg (89.54 KiB) Viewed 15209 times
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Re: The book of Sloyd

Postby ToneWood » Sun May 26, 2013 9:25 am

Some modern line winder designs - these are intended for kite lines but could be made in wood & adapted for float-lines, fishing lines, anchor rope, cables or hose:
laser-pro-card-winder.jpg
laser-pro-card-winder.jpg (32.58 KiB) Viewed 17549 times
http://goodwinds.com/line-winders.html
ImageImageImage
http://www.gombergkites.com/line.html ; http://ostro.ced.berkeley.edu/~crisr/di ... sionID=407 ; http://www.buildlog.net/blog/2010/08/hand-made/

Tip: Winders usually benefit from having at least one hole. For example, to:
- act as a handle
- allow the winder to be secured (e.g. to boat/kayak/float, usually by a lanyard & clip) & stored (e.g. hung from a hook)
- secure the end of the line/cable/etc.
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Re: The book of Sloyd

Postby ToneWood » Sat Sep 21, 2013 6:38 pm

<removed>
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Re: The book of Sloyd

Postby gavin » Sat Sep 21, 2013 9:33 pm

Tonewood,
Do you really feel the above posting is really relevant to the core business - and adds to the understanding - of a greenwood worker?
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
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Sloyd project? A bessom broom.

Postby ToneWood » Sun Feb 16, 2014 8:47 am

I made a besom broom this weekend. An enjoyable little sloyd (craft) project - perhaps a good one for children (esp. if they liked Harry Potter), as it is quite quick once you have sourced suitable material.

Bessom #2.jpg
Bessom #2.jpg (172.42 KiB) Viewed 16239 times


My broom material is mainly raspberry bush trimming cut a month or 2 ago - not traditional but it looked like it would make good broom material & gave me the idea in the first place. I added a few whippy branches off a decorative garden tree I recently pruned, for strength, & rose-hips for decoration :D. I used a fresh-cut hazel stick for the handle - but Drew Langsner recommends leaving both the handle & broom material to dry for a few weeks or more, so that the broom doesn't become loose later due to shrinkage.

I drilled a hole about 6" from the bottom of the handle & used that to anchor the binding material & so hold everything is place. I put a very old roofing rail through the hole too - Drew suggests a nail or dowel - although neither seemed necessary in this case. I used 1.6mm garden wire (a little thinner might be better) to make 3 bands around the broom material. A more natural material, such a willow/hazel withy or lime-bark fibre might give a more pleasing natural/authentic/green wood finish.

The broom works great for clearing dry leaves from the drive - faster & more effective than I expected. :)
Bessom #1 clean sweep.jpg
Bessom #1 clean sweep.jpg (127.4 KiB) Viewed 16239 times

I believe that the bottom of the broom is normally cut flat across with an axe (hatchet) but I like the rustic look of this one as it is. Apparently the French often leave them very long & the brush develops a curve which they use side-ways on.
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fid, slicker, purtle

Postby ToneWood » Wed Apr 30, 2014 1:56 pm

Fid
I came across some large vintage wooden fids on ebay - not cheap. Fids are like marlin spikes and used for splicing ropes & opening up knots among other things. Seems like something that would make a nice small project for a carver - even more so for a turner:
Image
This chap seems to have taken it to the limit: http://ropeandcanvas.blogspot.co.uk/p/tools.html

Dibber
The traditional gardener's dibber is used to make holes when planting seeds & seedling. In the old days they would sometimes be cut down from an old fork handle but increasingly shops are selling plastic dibbers:
Image Image http://www.haws.co.uk/products/haws_gar ... ibber.html

Slicker
I recently started doing more leather-work and it was recommended that I get myself a slicker - to smooth/burnish the edges of cut leather. The most common shape seems to be this one (an advanced a fid/dibber?):
Image
This too seems like a good project for a turner, & forum member TRS has already done just that: viewtopic.php?f=5&t=2282&start=67
Image

There are several other popular styles of slicker in current use:
Flat (one for the non-turners perhaps?):
Image

Combination (clever - could probably be used as a door stop too :) ):
Image
Cookie:
Image



Spurtle
And TRS also introduced us to yet another somewhat similar tool, the spurtle - a traditional Scottish term for a wooden implement used to stir porridge & probably other things tool: viewtopic.php?f=5&t=2282&start=72
Image
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Re: fid, slicker, purtle

Postby TRS » Thu May 01, 2014 9:34 am

ToneWood wrote:...

This too seems like a good project for a turner, & forum member TRS has already done just that: viewtopic.php?f=5&t=2282&start=67

...

And TRS also introduced us to yet another somewhat similar tool, the spurtle - a traditional Scottish term for a wooden implement used to stir porridge & probably other things tool: viewtopic.php?f=5&t=2282&start=72



*Blushing* now, thanks Tonewood :oops: :D

Here's my Dibber:
dibber.jpg
dibber.jpg (28.31 KiB) Viewed 16025 times


and finally, a Honey Dipper:
Honey Dipper.jpg
Honey Dipper.jpg (16.54 KiB) Viewed 16025 times


As a beginner, they take me ages to make but most seasoned turners can knock them out in no time at all!

Cheers

Tony
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Re: The book of Sloyd / small sloyd (craft) projects

Postby ToneWood » Thu May 01, 2014 7:41 pm

Excellent! I was just about to post a cross-link on the other thread so you would find this :) I didn't know that dibbers sometimes have depth marks until I found the image above - but I see yours already has that "advanced" feature. I like the honey dipper - I was planning to buy one at a craft fair, not sure how useful they are but I like the look of them :D.
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Re: The book of Sloyd / small sloyd (craft) projects

Postby TRS » Fri May 02, 2014 10:30 am

Thanks again Tonewood :)

I'm not sure how useful honey dippers are either but they do look very nice. I think the grooves in mine might be a bit shallow, but not having another one to compare I'm not sure. Perhaps I should just try it and see if it works :lol:

Of course now I really have to get out on the lathe this weekend and get some more done ;)

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Re: The book of Sloyd / small sloyd (craft) projects

Postby ToneWood » Thu May 08, 2014 8:55 pm

Some other ideas for small(-ish) sloyd projects, before I forget:
* Wooden spoons, ladles & butter spreaders - of course
* Axe/tool handles
* Walking stick /beating stick/ shepherd's crook / thumb stick (classics can include antler, honey-suckle twisted holly).
* Bokken, jo, bo (practice/demonstration sticks for Japanese martial arts)
* Bow & arrows, quarter staff, cudgel, froe-mallet, Commander/Beatle
* Carved wooden fishing lures (e.g. Rapala/Abu/Heddon-style)
* Needle case (perhaps using Wille Sundqvist's knife & twist technique to create a tube from a stick, or birch bark)
* Wooden tent pegs, pot-hooks
* Carved & decorated knife handle (e.g. per Jogge Sunqvist's book)
* Chopping/cutting board (ditto)
* Birch bark edge protectors & sheaths
* Hooks for hanging coats/clothes/cups/tools/garage paraphernalia.
* Roof shingles/shakes.
* traditional split wood clothes pegs

Bigger:
* Stool [ref. Jogge Sundqvist's book]/ chair [ref. Mike Abbot's book]
* Shave horse / bowl horse / bowlmate
* Kuksa (cup/tankard) & bowls of course
* Canadian-style canoe paddle (Ray Mear's style)
* Traditional wooden XC skis (ditto)
* Wooden shovel (see forum thread & video)
* Saddler's clam / leather pony
* Pole lathe
* Birch bark box/bag
* riving/froe brake
* gate hurdle
* riven wood fence/gate/arch
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