green woodworking with children

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green woodworking with children

Postby pedder63 » Fri Feb 22, 2013 9:17 pm

I wondered if anyone here had any good ideas for green woodwork project with children? I am currently working on a simple bird table with a slate roof, croquet mallet with steam-bent hoops, and loads of variations on pointy sticks - wands, throwing sticks, pooh sticks etc. Not sure if this is the best place for this topic, I for one would apppreciate a seperate area for childrens green woodworking - it seems so important to me to engage children with tools - safely and thoughtfully and with an awareness of the risks, but also of the benefits. Design technology in schools has been watered down to the point where in many schools most time is spent on 'design' activities, computer desing and CNC work, rather than children learning hand skills with real tools.
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Re: green woodworking with children

Postby robin wood » Sat Feb 23, 2013 4:03 pm

whittling twigs and sticks and the little book of whittling both by Chris Lubkemann http://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/Searc ... ng&x=0&y=0 were a favourite of my kids when small, lots of good thinks in there
http://www.robin-wood.co.uk bowls, books and courses
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Re: green woodworking with children

Postby JonnyP » Sat Feb 23, 2013 11:00 pm

French/Dutch arrows go down well if you have the space to launch them
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Re: green woodworking with children

Postby jrccaim » Tue May 07, 2013 4:25 am

Also: Nicola Wood's stick animals, elsewhere in this forum. Twig brooms. Simple bow and arrow (circular cross-section). More complex: a model log cabin. In my experience at cub scout age, knives are OK. Whenever edged tools are involved, I far prefer a drawknife and horse because it is almost impossible to cut yourself with a drawknife unless you grab it so that the edge cuts. The kids I work with are much smarter than that. I made a small-sized horse for the children. They far prefer the adult size. No comment. Teach the children to sharpen before you let them use the knife. A dull tool is an accident waiting to happen. With children I bring out the diamond stones. They cut much faster than anything else and the edges are good enough for children's purposes, indeed sharper than the average kitchen knife. (See my remarks on patience below). More projects: birchbark containers. Score the birchbark with knife, fold it, punch holes with awl, sew it up with string. Can make a model boat boat on the horse. Hollowing it out much more difficult (for a child). A model raft, to sail on the pond, even easier. For those into "Lord of the Rings" there are swords. Strangely enough there is the pole lathe. I find the girls in the village where I live are attracted to it! Boys not so much, Arangorns every one. Swords! One girl in particular absolutely unbelievably good. 10 YO. I have posted pictures of this girl in this forum, won't do it again. When dealing with children one remembers that their patience is limited. The younger the less patient. So I have a repertoire of projects to suit the age. For older children, 13 and up, we get into making your own knife out of a hacksaw blade, but that is not bodgering.
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