spoon pictures

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spoon pictures

Postby robin wood » Sun Apr 27, 2008 3:16 pm

Thought it would be nice to start a spoon picture thread. A place to post any spoon pictures, whether wonderful inspirational spoons that you have seen or just a "my first spoon" picture.

Here are a couple to start things off. The top spoon is one of ours (I rough them out and Nicola finishes them) The other two are by our spooncarving mentor Wille Sundqvist.

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Postby robin wood » Fri May 02, 2008 9:03 pm

Here are some Robin Fawcett just put on his blog
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Postby Steve Martin » Sat May 03, 2008 2:48 am

Below are four spoons I recently finished. The first three have at least one off-center axis and the fourth is a regular turned spoon.[img]http://www2.snapfish.com/thumbnailshare/AlbumID=227797323/a=83617[/img] (alt+p)[/img]
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spoons

Postby Steve Martin » Sat May 03, 2008 5:59 am

As you can see I still haven't figured out the picture puzzle. Even my wife, a programmer by trade and training, was unsuccessful. Will keep trying. My apologies.
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Postby goldsmithexile » Sun May 04, 2008 1:23 pm

These are a few recent ones in various stages of finish, done mostly in alder also some beech, lime and maple
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Some of these are on show at big blue sky gallery along with some chairs and stools, as you can see influenced by welsh and african form's
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Postby Nicola Wood » Tue May 27, 2008 4:03 pm

The kitchens at Saterglantan, the Swedish 'School of the Handicrafts', are inspirational both in the food they cook and the woodware they use to serve it from. It's an otherwise normal catering kitchen with stainless steel work surfaces and big mixers and dish washers etc. However, they have shelves full of splendid big bowls and a rack on the wall full of lovely spoons. Here's a little taster:
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Postby Follansbee » Thu May 29, 2008 3:33 am

Hello, I've been reading this forum for a few weeks now, and am quite impressed with the level of activity on it. Didn't know there were that many folks out there with axes and green wood. It's not often I make spoons, but I keep a few going now & then. Mostly I'm looking for very large diameter straight-grained oak for furniture, not really spoon wood. But the museum I work at uses a lot of firewood, so I poke around their woodpile now & then. The ones pictured here are birch, cherry, apple & one in Russian Olive wood, or so I was told. No, I could not identify that tree nor wood. As I recall, it was quite hard.

Just wanted to say I am enjoying these threads quite a bit. Hope to add to the fray now & then...
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Postby robin wood » Thu May 29, 2008 9:32 am

Great to have you posting here Peter and lovely spoons. Where did you learn the basics? They look quite Swedish style, do you have Wille Sundqvists book? Or have you met Del Stubbs?

The forum here is just getting going, it was quite up to a couple of months ago but the pole lathe turners association has 500 members and there are many more folk into green wood crafts besides. I think only a small proportion have so far discovered the forum so I expect it to grow rapidly and hopefully become an excellent online resource. Particularly if serious professionals like yourself stay around.
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Postby Follansbee » Fri May 30, 2008 2:12 am

thanks for the kind words Robin, Nicola, et al. We sound like a mutual admiration society...

My spoons look Swedish-ish because I learned them from Jogge & Willie Sundqvist. I met them both between 15-20 yrs ago at Drew & Louise Langsner's woodworking school, Country Workshops in North Carolina. Both outstanding craftsmen and teachers...

Over the years, Country Workshops has been I think the central point in the US for green woodworking, and hand tools. Willie was the first instructor Drew had come teach there 30 years ago and it was Bill Coperthwaite who introduced Willie and Drew back in the late 1970s. Robin, you'll remember my excitement over Bill's book A Handmade Life - still one of my favorites. Might not be very familiar in the UK, I don't know. For those interested in handwork, not only of wood, it's really worth looking for.

Not sure what protocol is about schilling for others here, but if it's allowable, here goes: Country Workshops' website is www.countryworkshops.org
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Postby Andrea L Willett » Wed Jun 04, 2008 12:11 pm

O.K. THIS time I'm going to post it under the right subject on the right forum. These are a pair of spoons I carved in 2005 It was seasoned wood, I didn't know about greenwood working when I did these.
Image I didn't have anybody to tell my how to do it so I cut the blank out of a piece of what I'd been told was willow on a friend's bandsaw. I balanced it on one long edge and cut in at a 45 degree angle from near the end of a side edge. When I was over 1/2 way to the other side I pulled back off the blade and swapped ends. I cut in at a 45 degree angle from a side edge and when I was over 1/2 way to the other side, angled it along the long axis to give me a handle and cut out to the previous 45. Turned it around and cut a second blank from the other side. I hollowed the bowl with a gouge I'd bought from an old cabinetmaker who was retiring and did the back partially with the gouge and partially with a Stanley knife.
They're based on the ones from Viking-Age Decorated Wood by James T. Lang which are from the Dublin excavations. The stems are both based on DW99 as is the decoration on the RH one. The decoration on the LH one is from the awl, DW34

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Postby Steve Martin » Fri Jun 06, 2008 5:18 am

Now that most of you think that all I do is turn spoons on an electric lathe here are some of my other spoons, I actually started in green wood by cutting curved branches, even with knots in the curves, splitting them and hand carving a spoon from the bottom piece and a fork from the top piece and giving/selling them as salad sets. Image
P.S. I figured out what I did wrong it the previous post where the images were so big. Thanks!
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Postby robin wood » Fri Jun 06, 2008 8:05 am

Great spoons Andrea and nice to see the originals too. Steve, I like the sound of the salad servers, those paired servers from a branch are often carved in Sweden, be great to see some pictures. This one came out a bit small I preferred the big ones. :D
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Postby robin wood » Fri Jun 06, 2008 8:08 am

Steve Martin wrote:Now that most of you think that all I do is turn spoons on an electric lathe here are some of my other spoons, I actually started in green wood by cutting curved branches, even with knots in the curves, splitting them and hand carving a spoon from the bottom piece and a fork from the top piece and giving/selling them as salad sets. Image
P.S. I figured out what I did wrong it the previous post where the images were so big. Thanks!


here is a note Nicola posted about picture size, and I see you are using photobucket so it may help.

"sizing is another thing people struggle with. Most digital cameras take enormous pictures and if you try to put them as they are on a forum they take ages to load and you have to scroll sideways to see them.

With photobucket when you upload there's a 'reduce to' box and if you select 640 x 480 (large) they'll fit on most people's screens. I guess most photo hosting sites have similar things."
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Postby Nicola Wood » Mon Jun 09, 2008 9:37 pm

A little more spoon inspiration for you. These are by Hungarian spoon maker Peter Kohidi who first inspired me to persevere with a tooled finish:
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He sands some too and these little bird caddy spoons are fantastic:
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These are fun ... and a brilliant photo too:
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Postby Andy Coates » Mon Jun 09, 2008 11:40 pm

What a truly stunning collection. YouÂ’d buy them just to look at! The salad servers are almost architectural. Lovely.
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