hewn/carved wooden bowls

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Re: Rebecs etc

Postby Nicola Wood » Thu Jul 03, 2008 11:58 am

Robin Fawcett wrote:Incidentally I have seen some people are now making large turned bowls with strings set across the top attached to tuning pegs. Not sure what the function is but they look nice. I'll try and track down some pictures.

Tobias Kay, who's somewhere down Devon way I think, makes 'sounding bowls' which are acoustically formed bowls with strings across the top. I think he makes them for music therapists, but they are beautiful too!
PS here they are on his web site http://www.tobias-kaye.co.uk/sndbowls/
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Postby kwadams » Fri Jul 04, 2008 12:46 am

David--

Beautiful bowls! I love the texture and finish. Great looking shop, too.

I've done some really rustic bowl work and would like to refine it some more. Right now I'm using a traditional elbow adze (Kestrel if you know of them) and a few crooked knives, but probably could use a gouge or two to help me along. I have purchased from Drew Langsner in the past (I'm in CT) and was wondering if you would advise which gouge(s) I should get for bowl carving. Which ones do you use the most? I see Drew has those videos you mentioned, too.

Thanks and hope you will post more often, especially photos of your bowls and shop.

Kevin Adams
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count me in

Postby Follansbee » Fri Jul 04, 2008 1:40 am

David
count me in among the many who admire your hewn bowls. I see some are cherry, I'm impressed. I made one out of maple (acer sp.) once, and it was a chore. I had previously made them from tulip poplar (Lirodendron tulipifera - not actually a poplar tree) with Drew...that works very easily.

I see you've done another carved box after the one you sent me images of...is that oak riven?
Nice work.
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gouges, boxes, and trees

Postby DavidFisher » Sun Jul 06, 2008 3:49 pm

Thanks for the nice comments, Kevin. The Hans Karlsonn gouges I purchased from C Workshops are excellent. I only have two of them, and that is all I have needed for nearly all bowls. I have the HKO6 and the HK07. The first is 35mm wide with a #55 HK sweep (a segment of a 55 mm circle). The second is 45 mm wide with a #150 HK sweep. These have squarish handles meant mainly for pushing with the hand rather than striking with the mallet. HK also has hooped gouges for mallet work. I prefer to work very close to the final surface with the adze, then refine by slicing with the gouge. All four videos CW offers are also very good, although they vary greatly -- from John Alexander's very thorough and clear explanations to the swiss cooperage video where nearly all that is heard is the souds of the tools on wood.

Peter -- yes that is my second (of two total) greenwood box. The first, I gave to my Dad. This one I use in the shop to hold papers and some small tools. The carving design was based on one I saw in the article about you in Woodwork magazine, with some border elements I noticed in St. George's The Wrought Covenant (p. 31). The box is 24"x15"x6.5". The entire box is of rived green oak (except for the bottom), and I love working with it. It has such a sweet smell it is almost too good to be true. I drove my wife crazy asking her to smell shavings. The bottom is one wide poplar board -- a very common secondary wood on a lot of old furniture from my neck-of-the-woods. Thanks for the inspiration, Peter. I hope other folks will explore the kind of joinery and method of work you are learning and teaching so much about. It is wonderful stuff.

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Regarding the wood species for bowls, I would agree that maple (depending on the specific type) is a chore. Black cherry (Prunus serotina) is harder than poplar of course, but I don't find it too difficult to work. And it is so beautiful and ideal for bowls. Possibly interesting to those in England, my tree ID book states that it was "One of the first New World trees introduced into English gardens, it was recorded as early as 1629."

This brings up the sycamore/maple label difference between the Britain and America that most of the folks on the forum are well aware of probably, but still throws me off sometimes. Here's the way I understand it, but maybe those with much more tree knowledge than me can correct me. Robin F. mentioned using "an 8" sycamore log (Acer pseudoplatanus)" for his rebec. That species would commonly be called here planetree Maple. What we would typically call sycamore is platanus occidentalis, a tree with beautiful mottled bark of white, green, and gray that grows very large (one in the US grew to a trunk diameter of fifteen feet). Our sugar maple (acer saccharum) is very hard, and I don't care to ever carve another bowl out of it, while silver maple (acer saccharinum) is much easier to work. And poplar... well never mind. Like Peter said, what we call poplar isn't really a poplar.
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Postby robin wood » Sat Jul 12, 2008 11:42 am

Just got a bit of time to post some more hewn bowl pics.

Here is a kuksa made by me and Nicola and 2 pics of one made by one of my heros Wille Sundqvist

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And here are some hewn/carved vessels from museums in Sweden.

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These ones are called ale geese and are my favourite but I have never made one. The big bowl is filled with booze and the small ones used for dipping and drinking.

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Postby paul atkin » Sat Jul 12, 2008 11:58 am

great pics :D that last one is awesome,i couldnt even imagine ever having enough time to make one. willies work is always nice to look at. and your kuksa great stuff.
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Postby robin wood » Sat Jul 12, 2008 12:22 pm

and a few more from the kitchens at Saterglantan the National handcraft school in Sweden.

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Postby Nicola Wood » Sat Jul 12, 2008 2:08 pm

That duck is one of my favourites. It is painted with hand made paints and quite roughly tooled so the paint has rubbed off the high points to wonderful effect!
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Bowls and Kuksa pictures

Postby DavidFisher » Wed Jul 16, 2008 3:34 am

Thanks for posting the beautiful pictures, Robin. I love the form of the Kuksa with the carved indentation around the outer rim and how it sweeps up gracefully to the front edge. I assume it just has a small flat on the bottom to help it sit somewhat steady like that? I also admire the many sensitively cut facets from the knife. A beautiful, tactile, and practical surface quality.

I've been meaning to try an ale-bowl for some time now. The pic may spur me to move it up on my list. The blue bowl with natural interior is also a beautiful form. Looks like the style made by Bengt Lingstrom who I watched in a video from C. Workshops. You can see by the growth ring pattern on the inside of the bowl in the picture that the half log was oriented with the pith down (bark up), which also creates the wonderful rim that sweeps up to the handles.

On the blue duck bowl that is being used for serving in the picture, Nicola mentions that the paint is handmade. I wonder if she knows what the base is to this paint. Is it gone over again with linseed oil or another oil, since it is obviously for use? I think it's great -- would make anyone smile at a dinner party.
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Postby Tom B » Wed Jul 16, 2008 5:57 pm

On the blue duck bowl that is being used for serving in the picture, Nicola mentions that the paint is handmade. I wonder if she knows what the base is to this paint. Is it gone over again with linseed oil or another oil, since it is obviously for use? I think it's great -- would make anyone smile at a dinner party.


http://www.ibiblio.org/ecolandtech/rural-skills/homemade/homemade-paint
is an interesting link with recipes for traditional paints, in this case Danish, but probably similar to those used elsewhere...
There are some nice iron oxide reds down at the beach I keep meaning to go and sample for use as pigment. I'm a geology student, and while doing fieldwork I have seen some incredible couloured rocks, I think particualy from very weathered and altered basalts. At the time it didn't cross my mind to collect them for pigments!

Here is a hewn aspen lauter tun, used in brewing Sahti beer in Finland.
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There are more pictures and information on the website

http://www.posbeer.org/oppaat/sahti/equipment.php

Thankyou to everone who has posted pictures, there are some beautiful and inspiring creations.

Tom
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Re: Bowls and Kuksa pictures

Postby robin wood » Wed Jul 16, 2008 6:26 pm

DavidFisher wrote:On the blue duck bowl that is being used for serving in the picture, Nicola mentions that the paint is handmade. I wonder if she knows what the base is to this paint. Is it gone over again with linseed oil or another oil, since it is obviously for use? I think it's great -- would make anyone smile at a dinner party.


The two most commonly used paint recipes we came across in Sweden are
1 simply mix pigment with linseed, apply and wait a long time for it to dry, gives a nice gloss finish, some Swedish linseeds go off quite quickly especially if it has been partially oxidised by sitting it in the sun in a glass bowl for a few months.

The other one which we use a lot is an oil and egg emulsion. Take one whole egg crack it into a jar, shake well. Add twice the volume of good linseed (raw) stirring all the time (use the eggshell to measure volume, 4 half shell fulls) Put lid on jar and shake well. Now add water again stirring all the time, 2-3 times as much volume as the egg. Finally add the pigment of your choice, we have a range bought in Sweden and I collect iron oxide locally. This quantity will paint 2 doors both sides. It will keep a week in the fridge. It is touch dry in 20 minutes but takes a couple of months to reach full hardness. It tends to dry slightly matt, a glaze of clear linseed makes it more gloss.
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Postby robin wood » Wed Jul 16, 2008 6:27 pm

[quote="Tom B"][quote]

Here is a hewn aspen lauter tun, used in brewing Sahti beer in Finland.
/quote]

Nice pics and links Tom,
i thought he was feeding the pigs till I read more.
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Oils, Rocks

Postby DavidFisher » Thu Jul 17, 2008 4:25 pm

I am glad you mentioned the rocks for pigments, Tom. It reminded me of one of my early memories. When I was four years old or so, we had a concrete patio with a rough surface. I would take various colors of sedimetary rocks I found and grind them back and forth on the patio for the sheer amazement in the soft colored powders it produced. I would brush the powder into little piles with my fingers. It is a very vivid memory. I guess I'll have to try it again and mix it with some eggs or linseed oil. I don't think I'll try the beer making technique, but the photos were great. Very interesting.

Robin mentioned the partial oxidizing of the raw linseed oil paint which permits it to dry faster. Is this solar power method used also with just raw linseed oil (no pigment) when treating woodenware? Would there be any advantage to using raw linseed oil that has not been partially oxidized or polymerized? Is raw linseed oil what you usually use on spoons and other woodenware? W. Sundquist?
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Re: Oils, Rocks

Postby robin wood » Thu Jul 17, 2008 5:35 pm

DavidFisher wrote:Robin mentioned the partial oxidizing of the raw linseed oil paint which permits it to dry faster. Is this solar power method used also with just raw linseed oil (no pigment) when treating woodenware? Would there be any advantage to using raw linseed oil that has not been partially oxidized or polymerized? Is raw linseed oil what you usually use on spoons and other woodenware? W. Sundquist?


The partial polymerisation of oil is most used by folks making paints for houses I think as you don't want to be rubbing against a wall where the paint takes 3 months to dry. It certainly would be better for treating all your woodware as it goes off faster. I have some that is almost setting in the bottle but it is a hassle so most folk just use raw. The only benefit of using raw over partialy polymerised I can think of is that it is available off the shelf and you can use it straight away out of the bottle. Raw linseed is what I and Sundqvist use for daily use items.

Here he is finishing a bowl.

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This one has another technique, not so traditional. When he carves lettering in a bowl he mixes pigment with PVA glue to a thick paste, this he rubs into the cut letters (the surrounding wood already being oiled does not take the PVA) it looks good when finished.
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Re: hewn/carved wooden bowls

Postby Shankar » Wed Nov 19, 2008 11:44 pm

Absolutely beautiful bowls- feel all inspired.
You should teach if thats not going to spoil your escape from the day job.
What adze are you using for roughing out the inside?

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