second hand tools

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second hand tools

Postby SeanHellman » Sun Sep 06, 2009 1:51 pm

I bought a few second hand French tools at Westonbirt and one in particular I would like to know more about, it is the hook knife at the top, it has a flat back and the bevels are on the inside, it is over a foot long and has a socket for a handle in the end. I can use it a bit like a drawknife for shaving flat or convex work but it does not seem to be good for concave shapes. I love the saw teeth setters pliers at the bottom, an art work in themselves
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Re: second hand tools

Postby Ian S » Sun Sep 06, 2009 2:19 pm

Hi Sean

They look interesting!

Could the hook knife be a bowl turning hook? I fine the length of the shaft surprising for a knife. That axe looks like a beauty - any idea what it was for (it looks very like a Gransfors carver in shape)?

Cheers
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Re: second hand tools

Postby woodness sake » Sun Sep 06, 2009 2:41 pm

Looks like some of the tools I've seen used for carving wooden shoes. Not sure about the socket though.
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Re: second hand tools

Postby Robin Fawcett » Sun Sep 06, 2009 10:20 pm

Seriously nice looking set of tools there Sean - I'm a bit jealous and would have been tempted too.

The hook tool could be for carving out the toes of wooden clogs as woodness sake says.
The thin axe could be what's called a "nug" axe here - for cutting shoots out of hazel stools and hurdle making. There's a lot of noisette in France, specially in Brittany.
What's the makers mark on the axe? Looks like a precursor and pattern for the Gransfors carving axe...
I have seen a similar saw set but it was Swedish.

The handle on the axe doesn't look very ergonomic. Could you say what you paid for them?
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Re: second hand tools

Postby SeanHellman » Mon Sep 07, 2009 7:39 am

Robin, the tools cost next to nothing about £7 each but I also got a discount so about £5 each, I did not ask for any discount and I also bought a couple of really good big saws as well. The saw setter is actually from an English tool seller and cost £2. With the axe I put a handle I had lying about on just to get an idea of the feel, it is not fixed or finished so can be taken out. The makers mark is that of a dog or wolfs head, I can not read the name off the photo so will check today at the workshop. The axe looks a bit cheep with I think it is made from a sheet of metal that has been bent to form an eye and then welded, with the bottom of the eye with extra welding to square it off, unlike our kentish pattern axes. Some of the other axes with handles on had the head the other way up, with the hook at the bottom, this looked a bit odd to me and could be that someone just stuck the heads on without knowing what they where doing, or they where meant to be like this for a specific job, but I doubt it.
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Re: second hand tools

Postby SeanHellman » Mon Sep 07, 2009 5:17 pm

More tools and close up of axe
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as I said in my last post the eye has been bent round and welded up

A frame saw for ripping down planks and it still cuts inch timber before cleaning it up. I love the s handle and it works very well, it looks like the user made and put it on themselves
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I have never seen a hand saw with green wood teeth on before, it is very blunt and will take a lot of filing, but the set is good. I will be spending this winter learning how to sharpen saws, and then it is goodbye to hardpoint disposable saws forever, just another small step in trying to be a bit greener
saw-teeth.jpg
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Re: second hand tools

Postby goldsmithexile » Wed Sep 09, 2009 10:51 am

the second one down is a mortice axe, for chopping big mortices after pre drilling with an auger. I think the Swedish axe people make a version?
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Re: second hand tools

Postby RichardLaw » Wed Sep 09, 2009 11:07 pm

The ax (American economy of spelling) name means wolf! The welding looks to be a gas weld to me, nowt wrong with that.
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Re: second hand tools

Postby Mark Allery » Thu Sep 10, 2009 10:39 pm

Sean,

I share your aim of learning to sharpen the saw. But before you dispose of the hardpoint saw, I was reminded the other day that apparently they make very good cabinet scrapers. I aim to try one soon. Likewise circular saw blades can make quite reasonable crook knives.

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Re: second hand tools

Postby Donald Todd » Thu Sep 10, 2009 11:32 pm

Yes, they make very good cabinet scrapers. I wish I could get the hang of sharpening them. A scorp, then cabinet scraper, are all I use for hollowing chair seats.
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Re: second hand tools

Postby SeanHellman » Fri Sep 11, 2009 6:13 pm

The hook tool has been sharpened and is in use, after seeing the French clog maker video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71-tudJM51oI posted yesterday, it all made sense.
The photo here is me making a kuksa on my new work bench with the hook tool, not quite the intended use but very close. A fantastic tool for hollowing a kuksa.
hook-tool.jpg
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The leverage is huge and makes easy going of removing the apple wood
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Re: second hand tools

Postby Ian S » Fri Sep 11, 2009 8:57 pm

(100th post - whoopee!! :D )

Hi Sean - interesting pics - could you give us more info (and pics - pics are good) of that very natty looking bench thingy you're using?

Thanks
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Re: second hand tools

Postby SeanHellman » Fri Sep 11, 2009 9:35 pm

Maybe :D
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Re: second hand tools

Postby jrccaim » Wed Sep 16, 2009 4:59 am

Mark Allery said:

I share your aim of learning to sharpen the saw. But before you dispose of the hardpoint saw, I was reminded the other day that apparently they make very good cabinet scrapers. I aim to try one soon. Likewise circular saw blades can make quite reasonable crook knives.


I have tried them. They work exactly as advertised. Furthermore, you can forge up acceptable small knives out of saws. I am becoming as obsessive at hoarding metal as I am about wood. That is because I am learning (slowly!) that, as George Dyson says in his book, Baidarka " never buy anythng you can make, and never make anything you can find."

Those are really all gorgeous tools, Sean; I love that frame saw.

And Donald Todd said:

Yes, they make very good cabinet scrapers. I wish I could get the hang of sharpening them. A scorp, then cabinet scraper, are all I use for hollowing chair seats.


Mike Abbot's book has a good discussion of how to sharpen a scraper. I happen to have a burnisher, but you really don't need it. Any hard piece of steel will do it, e.g. a chisel or gouge. Basically grind (or file) a steep chisel edge on it, then use the burnisher to fold the edge -- put a burr on it. Most books tell you to grind (or file) the edge square, then burnish the edge. With the Abbot method, I get beautiful little curls, a microplane in fact..
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Re: second hand tools

Postby Donald Todd » Wed Sep 16, 2009 7:49 am

You can't always rely on the shank of a gouge to be hard enough; the round handle of a needle file is more likely.
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