Curved Drawknife

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Curved Drawknife

Postby Ross Peters » Wed Sep 26, 2012 8:49 pm

Hello,

I bought this drawknife from ebay the other week, thought it was a beautiful thing, and at £15 plus £8 P&P (from France) a bargain! I've still got to finish sharpening it, but I wondered if anyone had any thoughts on what it might be used for? I thought it would be good for roughing out planks before planing or carving chair bottoms.

Image
Image

Cheers,
Ross
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Re: Curved Drawknife

Postby anobium » Thu Sep 27, 2012 3:55 pm

These are quite common in French junk sales, though yours seems to have a more pronounced curve than most. I think they were originally used to hollow the inside of barrel staves.
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Re: Curved Drawknife

Postby bulldawg_65 » Thu Sep 27, 2012 9:20 pm

I agree with Anobium. I just saw a cooper use one on the inside of a barrel stave he was preparing.
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Re: Curved Drawknife

Postby Ross Peters » Sat Sep 29, 2012 10:52 am

Great, thanks chaps. I thought it might be a coopers drawknife. Now I've made a sheath from an old belt for it, I will sharpen it properly!

Image

The handles are split but secure and have worm holes. Is it likely that they are still active? If so, perhaps I should turn new ones. Any thoughts?
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Re: Curved Drawknife

Postby chipsrod » Thu Dec 20, 2012 7:38 am

ref. your handls i use jp weld or a steel apoxy my old drow knife has been in use for 35 years with this typ of repair. ref. to drow knives way back when i do not remember there was a descussion on the types of cutting edges peaple had on there drow knives. one edge that came up was the back bevel . i do not know if an ansser came up as to why it was used. the makers of drow knives did this to supplie the needs of the sadle makers .
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Re: Curved Drawknife

Postby gavin » Thu Dec 20, 2012 10:15 am

Ross Peters wrote:Image

The handles are split but secure and have worm holes. Is it likely that they are still active? If so, perhaps I should turn new ones. Any thoughts?

For any worm, I suggest you microwave the knife if you can fit it in. Or freeze it for several days.
If the splits are likely to pinch your hands as you work, you may as well turn up new handles.

Your sheath - has that a welt? i.e. a 3rd strip between the upper and lower panels? If not, the stitching will soon be cut by the edge. Rivets are better if you have no welt. The edge cannot touch the rivet because the leather is too tightly compressed by the rivet.

I posted a sheath making tutorial here.
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Re: Curved Drawknife

Postby Steve Martin » Fri Dec 21, 2012 4:56 am

According to my microwave instructions and one bad experience, I will NEVER put metal in a microwave again. If you know something about how to microwave metal, Gavin, please share. Thank you and Merry Christmas!
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Re: Curved Drawknife

Postby gavin » Fri Dec 21, 2012 8:01 am

Steve Martin wrote:According to my microwave instructions and one bad experience, I will NEVER put metal in a microwave again. If you know something about how to microwave metal, Gavin, please share. Thank you and Merry Christmas!

D'oh - you are absolutely right about metal in microwave. :oops:
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Re: Curved Drawknife

Postby Simon Hartley » Fri Dec 21, 2012 8:49 pm

Take the handles off first and microwave them on their own? Hmm, after all that faffing about, you might as well turn new ones.
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Re: Curved Drawknife

Postby Ross Peters » Sat Jan 19, 2013 12:00 pm

I too have had a metal/microwave experience- one not to be repeated!
I had forgotten all about this post :oops: ,and the tool in question in fact. I'm guessing that the sub zero temperatures of the past week will possibly have killed any wood worm? In any case I will replace them if need be as and when family permits!

Gavin, the sheath does have a welt, thanks to the wealth of knowledge I've managed to gleen from this wonderful forum! Since then I've successfully completed two axe and a billhook sheath. Hoorah! :D

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Re: Curved Drawknife

Postby ulfhedinn » Mon Jan 21, 2013 8:40 pm

I've been told that worm holes are made when the worm _leaves_, and that the entry holes are too small to notice. If this is true, then worm holes may mean missing wood--a little or a lot--but no living worms. Of course, all this assumes the worms are all on one schedule! I've always just given the wood a whiff of bug spray when I see evidence of tracks or holes, assuming there's enough left inside when I split it. If it's badly eaten in there, well, we heat the house with a woodstove.

I'd be inclined to disinfect the handles somehow, in place on the drawknife, and worry about replacing the handles if they turn out to be weakened. That would probably show up as loosening of the handles as wormy wood crumbled around the tangs. Because I've seen pieces of wood that only had one or two tiny worm tracks, and were still quite strong; others are completely riddled, and you can't always tell from looking at the surface. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" might apply for you here.

For what it's worth.

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Re: Curved Drawknife

Postby ulfhedinn » Mon Jan 21, 2013 8:47 pm

Nice job on that sheath! WRT rivets or welts--I only recently learned the trick of sewing a middle strip (welt) into a sheath to give the edge something to rest on besides the stitching. Another thing that works is riveting, as was mentioned, but remember to use rivets of copper, aluminum or other soft metal. Steel rivets are hard enough to be bad for the tool edge!

Or I saw a knife sheath once without a welt, where the stitching had been starting to go from being cut. The guy just picked out the old stitching and restitched the sheath with copper wire. I don't know how long it lasted (metal fatigue in the copper wire seems a possibility) but it didn't cost anything and looked attractive.

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Re: Curved Drawknife

Postby gavin » Tue Jan 22, 2013 8:32 am

ulfhedinn wrote: Steel rivets are hard enough to be bad for the tool edge!

If the rivet is tight enough, then the compression in the leather means the tool edge won't get near the edge.
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