STOCK KNIFE

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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby jez » Sun Nov 04, 2012 11:30 pm

There's only two guys skilled in the use of the clog knives. Jeremy and Geraint. I've never seen a fresh pair of handcut soles from anyone else in thirty years save Rick Rybicki , John the Fish, Hywel Davies and a chap who used to be in midwales but moved to Scotland thirty years ago. To my knowledge they've all packed up. There's no point asking Trefor or Phil as neither carve. Unlike Trefor Phil doesn't even pretend he does, he's an honest bloke who makes nice clogs with machinery. I once sold a set of knives to a bloke in Kent. He'd worked with Trefor for two years and never seen him carve. You may as well go to a Dodo for flying lessons.
A women did contact me a while ago, but after I pointed out it's very heavy work I heard no more. Geraint is built like Shrek, oh and Jeremy has been making clogs since 1978, a bit more than 20 years. He's old and grumpy now
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCQgkJJz_tI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ER3NTg_E ... ure=relmfu
4 more tedious parts and an intro
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UwOEVeQE ... el&list=UL
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby jez » Tue Nov 06, 2012 12:08 am

Robin may have seen Wocko's peg knife. Wocko knocked it together from a bill hook and a couple of bits of steel tube. It's light and works well. Actually the bevel doesn't seem to matter, an ordinary billhook bevel is fine. Generally peg knives are about 6" shorter in the handle than the stock knife and tend to have the hook, blade and handle all in a line. The stock knife handle is offset so that when you cut clog soles the handle isn't occupying the same space as your brain. Pegs tend to be cut middle to end, a lot of clog carving is end to middle. Due to this and the shorter handle a peg bench should be higher set than a clog bench. I'd say about a hand's width above your knee, but I'm not an expert, Terry Heard is.
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby nic » Tue Nov 06, 2012 3:32 pm

jez wrote: Jeremy has been making clogs since 1978, a bit more than 20 years. He's old and grumpy now


Now? - I have it on good authority that Jeremy has always been old and Grumpy.
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby jez » Tue Nov 06, 2012 11:23 pm

No, he was once young and depressive.
Anyway the knives. I reset the the better of the two stock knives with a second bevel, using water stones, took about thirty minutes and now it cuts really well, holds it's edge, leaves a glass smooth finish and needs less pressure than my normal blocker. Then I tested the french curved blade. That cuts so well it left questions as to my two hollowers. Finally I had a go with the worn stock knife. It is set slightly steeper so holds it's edge. Unfortunately it won't plane. It wants to dig in. I feel it needs the cutting edge left as it is and more taken off the blade to get a secondary bevel. More work I'm afraid. If I get over your way I'll bring one of the hollowers. I think they may need the back bevel taking back a bit to shallow the angle a touch.
I want the worn blocker for cleaning up old pairs. They nearly always have hidden rusty nails however hard one tries to locate all the shanks, so I want a knife just for that rather than buggering up my best knives, or I could try the peg knife for that, not tested that yet.
So to recap
Probably need the high carbon top side of my third blocker faced, need a longer and secondary bevel on the worn blocker, need a longer bevel on one hollower for comparison and could do with the inside of one gripper bit refaced to remove the pitting.
At my advanced years I need all the help I can muster.
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby Billman » Wed Nov 07, 2012 11:47 am

Still possible to buy a 'paroir de sabotier' in France at a reasonable price. Currently stuck in Bordeaux - car broken down (1000 euros for a new clutch slave cylinder) and strained liagments in my knee, so need a walking stick. Couldn't find one, so visited the flea market and bought a paroir for 5 euros - exactly the right length for a walking stick, but a little heavy.. Blade rusty, but hardly used - handle worm eaten, but repairable or replaceable....
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby witt » Wed Nov 07, 2012 12:07 pm

Good luck for the battle of "wounded knee", chief !
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby ToneWood » Wed Nov 07, 2012 2:58 pm

Billman wrote:Still possible to buy a 'paroir de sabotier' in France at a reasonable price. Currently stuck in Bordeaux - car broken down (1000 euros for a new clutch slave cylinder) and strained liagments in my knee, so need a walking stick. Couldn't find one, so visited the flea market and bought a paroir for 5 euros - exactly the right length for a walking stick, but a little heavy.. Blade rusty, but hardly used - handle worm eaten, but repairable or replaceable....
Sorry to hear about your car & knee Billman. I broke my toe (probably - they don't x-ray) earlier in the year, it's surprising how much it sets you back. So I guess picking up a nice heavy old French work bench with bench hooks for me is out of the question then? ;)

[Coincidentally I was mulling over the possibility of popping over to France to get a workbench while stuck in traffic yesterday - unfortunately my conclusion was that such a trip would be difficult & expensive and unlikely to result in success. :( There were a couple of nice French workbenches on ebay in the UK last week but v. pricey - destined to become expensive wine racks no doubt :(.]
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby Billman » Sun Nov 11, 2012 8:04 pm

Sorry, back in the UK now - anyway, no room in the car as I bought a nice old French machine in Bordeaux.... I have worked out what it is and what it does, but I'll post a couple of images as a 'whatsit'..... (the blade is held into the arm with a dovetail and a locking bolt - its action is similar to that of a stock-knife, but about 5 degrees from the vertical).
Attachments
Engine17.jpg
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Engine 12.jpg
Engine 12.jpg (124.78 KiB) Viewed 6090 times
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby robgorrell » Sat Feb 23, 2013 5:58 pm

OK, I give up, what does the machine do? It is a beauty.
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Welsh clog maker

Postby ToneWood » Sat Feb 23, 2013 8:50 pm

There was a short article on Radio 4 Friday morning about a shortage of clogs for young Welsh clog dancers - apparently there has been a sudden growth in interest in the activity. Apparently Welsh clogs are different to English clogs, and it said there is only one maker left (outside St. Fagans, the TV version below adds), Trefor Owen: http://www.treforowenclogmaker.co.uk/home . He is planning to retire in the coming years & is looking for an apprentice.

Looks like the BBC were rehashing their own old news article from December: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-20563789

Apparently Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis is interested in shoe-making too: http://businesstoday.intoday.in/story/t ... /1617.html
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby Billman » Tue Feb 26, 2013 3:57 pm

Sorry. I thought I had posted the answer to my machine 'Whatsit', but I have been having problems accessing the forum at the end of 2012 until now - still only get on about 1 day in 10...

The machine is a bonde cutter - the bonde is the tapered wooden plug that stops up the filling hole in a wine barrel - we use similar in beer barrels, except we also leave a spile hole in the centre. Bondes would be made of a soft hardwood, such as poplar, rough sawn to size and the the cutter rotates the blank as the blade goes up and down - approx 40 teeth on the ratchet, so it cuts a 40 sided polygon, rather than a true circle - the blade is inclined about 5 degrees from the vertical, so it cuts a tapered bung...

IMHO it would be easier and quicker to use a lathe, but the advantages is of the machine are a) you do not need to be skilled, and b) it does not need someone to make the lathe rotate (c.f. hand powered lathes used in wheelwrights shops to turn the knaves (hubs) of the wheel)... I guess thus that it a pre-industrial era machine, used where all operations were carried out by hand without any sort of motive power....
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby jez » Sat Mar 16, 2013 2:32 am

Trefor comes out with that garbage quite regularly
There's no sudden demand and several machinists like him to fill the current demand. It's just a publicity generating stunt
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