STOCK KNIFE

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STOCK KNIFE

Postby tonytolliday » Sat Nov 22, 2008 12:28 pm

HI all i been trying for ages to bye a stock knife ,what i meand by a stock knife is the large blades used to make tent pegs . they look a lot like the large knives shown in a earleir post about clogknives . i come to believe the only way out is make one as i cant find any stockists. unless anbody out there can help.
Thank you
Tony
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby Mark Allery » Sat Nov 22, 2008 1:29 pm

Hi Tony,

A friend of mine, Mick Stanton, is an edge tool maker and he does make stock knives. They aren't cheap but he is a good edge tool maker. He goes under the name Fraught Wraught and here is a link to the price list on his site

http://www.fraughtwrought.co.uk/?page_id=5

and here is a photo of one in use (John Sinclair of the Surrey and Sussex Coppice Group) making pegs for various scout group tents,

DSCF7895.jpg
DSCF7895.jpg (79.36 KiB) Viewed 14060 times


hope this helps

cheers

Mark
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby tonytolliday » Sat Nov 22, 2008 2:57 pm

thank you it is just what i wanted shame about the price oh well better start saving
Tony
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby DavidFisher » Sun Nov 23, 2008 4:04 am

I, too, thank you for that information. I have been keeping my eyes open for a block/stock knife. His certainly appears to be made in the traditional manner and looks like a well-designed tool. I realize that it might be expensive for just making a few tent pegs, but at $185 U.S., the price seems appropriate for the tool. That's cheaper than many top-quality axes, and a much harder tool to find. Now, if I can find $185... :wink:
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby DavidFisher » Fri Dec 05, 2008 3:29 pm

Here is a video of a guy in Amsterdam expertly using a stock knife on some clogs.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPMT9SpG1SU
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby Robin Fawcett » Sun Dec 21, 2008 7:15 pm

If you can't afford to buy one - have a go at making one from an old billhook. I saw someone using one he'd made for roughing out spoons with - it seemed quick and efficient.

Image

The billhook should be a Suffolk type if possible with a convex blade and also ground on only one side (useful for cutting in concave curves). Also of the type with a socket rather than a tang.
Cut and grind off the 'beak' and weld on a ring or hook.
I think the handle should be solid metal rather than wood - on the one I saw it just had a crowbar jammed in the socket.
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby sharpknives » Wed Feb 10, 2010 9:25 am

i have read a blog about a stock knife and i was convinced to have one.
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby Mike Abbott » Sun Feb 28, 2010 3:51 pm

I have an idea that Ray Iles is thinking of making some. I'll have to get him to look at this site himself as he caters mainly for the green wood trade.
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby ulfhedinn » Sun Feb 28, 2010 11:22 pm

OK, enough about the stock knives already! I've wanted one for a long time, and all this talk has got me actually moving. I now have a couple of blanks cut out of a big leaf spring, and now maybe I can start forging on them. I'll take some pictures in case it works out well.

I haven't done it before because I've never actually handled or used one, so of course I wonder if there's some important little aspect I don't know. Also, my forge is awfully small for getting an even heat for hardening so big a blade. I may just leave it normalized, and sharpen a little more often. Or go find a swordsmith with a bigger forge or furnace, and trade him something for a heat-treating run.

If I come up with one that works well, I'll make the other up for sale or trade. Not sure whether anyone on this forum would be interested--shipping such a thing would probably cost a lot, and Lord knows what British customs people would say about such an obvious terrorist weapon... :wink:

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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby FGYT » Mon Mar 01, 2010 11:00 am

you could do the heat treat by clearing back a bit of turf and makking a big BBQ with Charcol or what ever you use in the forge and a hoover as a blower etc

make sure you have a big enough tank to quench in both in length and volume

ATB

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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby ulfhedinn » Mon Mar 01, 2010 9:49 pm

[quote="FGYT"]you could do the heat treat by clearing back a bit of turf and makking a big BBQ with Charcol or what ever you use in the forge and a hoover as a blower etc

make sure you have a big enough tank to quench in both in length and volume

Good advice, all of it--especially about having a large enough quench volume. I'll also need a good cover for the quenching bath, because it will be oil (this spring stock has cracked on me too often when quenched in water). The oil will likely flash into flame with so big a piece, and you need a large enough cover to snuff the fire out. Probably easiest to just do some more digging, and have a large scrap of sheet metal handy.

Most vacuum cleaners throw too much air, even for a big fire trough like you suggest, but it's easy enough to divert some of the air with a T-fitting and partial cover. Too much air gives an oxidizing fire, and the last thing I want is pitting on the blade!

I'm still going to ask around, to see if any of my colleagues have a setup this size already in place. There are more than two dozen smithies within an hour's drive of here, and some are much bigger operations than mine. But digging up a bit of my yard would be no great loss, given how much of it the dogs have already destroyed, so you've described the fallback position.

Besides, it's always good to hear from someone else who thinks of digging a hole instead of some elaborate shop construct! It's easy to over-elaborate, and this job isn't complicated, just large. Thanks!

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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby FGYT » Mon Mar 01, 2010 10:20 pm

on cracking you could try takinge the blade out after a few seconds you only need a fast quench to get past teh nose on the TTT curve basically once its not visably red any more you can slow the cooling down quite a bit. The matiensite which gives the hardness dosnt start to form til its relativley cool 250deg C (450 F i think) and its this change in structure which gives a 4% shrinkage that causes stress cracks and bends etc if done fast an unevenly oil slows cooling at these lower temps , water dosnt
heres a site i found that explains it in fairly understandable terms
http://www.navaching.com/forge/heattreat.html

its also why you can straighten bent blades after quench before they cool fully
ATB

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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby lupilu » Thu Feb 03, 2011 7:03 pm

Hello,

I was just wonderind whether you have still got these tools?

My sister is learning how to make clogs at the moment and is on the look out for clogging tools as she is finding them very hard to get hold of.

Thanks,
Lucy.
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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby Brian Williamson » Thu Feb 03, 2011 7:33 pm

Hi Lucy, welcome to the Forum,

There are a couple of other threads on stock-knives that you may find interesting if you scroll further down under 'Tools'. You've probably found them already since you found this one.

Stock-knives are notoriously difficult to find, but wonderful tools to use if you do get hold of them. You need a set of three to be a clog maker of course, which makes it three time as difficult Who is your sister learning her clog making with? I've always fancied making myself a pair. I have the large, blocking, knife and a smaller pegging one, so I'm half-way to a full set.

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Re: STOCK KNIFE

Postby riptoff » Sat Feb 05, 2011 10:47 pm

I sometimes come across French clog-makers paroirs (stock knives) in junk sales in France.
I am entering one in the AGM auction which has a blade length of about 35cm so is rather small. The larger ones fetch around 100€.
Junk sales start in March so I can keep a look out if anyone is interested.
tony bryant
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