Shaving horses

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Re: Shaving horses

Postby Davie Crockett » Sun Dec 25, 2011 12:40 pm

If you run Google Chrome as your browser, Download Sketchup (Free). Then google Brian Boggs shave horse. It comes up with 10 models which are rendered in 3d.
I'm posting from the works computer which doesn't have sketchup and I don't have clearance to load it so I don't know what the plans are like but the 3d rendering gives a very clear idea of what you need.

Edit: they are housed on Googles 3d warehouse: http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=8edddcdd3d53628697046e48d8f1e936&ct=mdrm
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby RichardLaw » Sun Dec 25, 2011 12:44 pm

Davie Crockett wrote:I'm posting from the works computer

Hope you get home in time for Christmas dinner!

Happy Christmas!
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby Davie Crockett » Sun Dec 25, 2011 12:48 pm

Thanks Richard, I won't get home 'til nearly midnight tonight. Same again tomorrow :roll: Still, on the bright side, loads of time off coming in February :D

Happy Christmas!
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby RichardLaw » Sun Dec 25, 2011 12:52 pm

Ah well at least you don't sound too busy.

My daughter just made me a Christmas rice pie with a Land Rover decoration.
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby simon » Sat Jan 14, 2012 1:35 pm

Another one to add to the herd. I wanted to make smaller shavehorse. I am over 6ft and tend to make things to fit myself. That can leave other people streching a bit. I used my wife,who just tops 5ft as a guide for this one. The main part is birch and the rest is ash.
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby woodeninjun » Mon Mar 19, 2012 11:25 am

New member making a first post here.
I completed my shaving cuddy yesterday and despite a few niggles it works well. For those of you struggling to get round wood, for £15 the sawmill in the next village to me cut 4' of the base of a pine trunk up the middle. I cleaved/clove? the side spars from horse chestnut and initially used treenails to hold them on ( this worked better than the threaded rod I replaced them with). I cut the mortices for the legs with a wide chisel but set them without enough angle- I'll make new legs with a curve in them to sort that out. The legs were made from seasoned, sawn timber but I split them with a froe and a home made glut. I also made the legs a bit too long so I'll deal with that at the same time. I've got a long screwnail holding the hinging piece and will have to replace it- perhaps with a treenail or leather hinge.
This has been a real education in some of the techniques eg hewing and using the drawknife on the rungs. I made the first version of the rungs from privet hedge so that I could work on the real rungs again made from horsechestnut (because it is what I had) - cost so far £15, everything else was re-cycled or firewood. I'm pleased with this first big-ish piece of green-ish woodwork and I'm quite aware of the less than perfect materials but so far I.ve found it difficult to get green ash or oak and as for sweet chestnut...
Next on the list is to finish rungs, a heavier maul and a gismo from old gas pipe to make treenails. Eventual goal a Mastermyr chest in oak.
Any advice and words of wisdom would be very welcome.
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby gavin » Mon Mar 19, 2012 2:03 pm

Can you post pictures?
Several years ago there were instructions on how to post pictures here, but I cannot find them.

Why don't you drill holes for your legs?
Why not use the champion the lumber horse design?
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby ToneWood » Mon Mar 19, 2012 2:18 pm

witt wrote:Do you have this model in the U.K. ?
[Image

Ian S wrote:That's an interesting shavehorse! It looks very like David F Fisher's bowl carving shavehorse in that it appears to clamp 'front and back' rather than 'top and bottom.'
That was my first thought too. As Chuck Berry used to say "ain't nothin' new under the sun". My father-in-law gave me a big old plank - maybe 2"x10"x4.5' - a couple of years back, which he was given but thought too good for firewood. It is rough and splintery* on the outside and he describes it as "pitch pine", whatever than means, and he thinks it was an old scaffolding plank (but it looks rather thick and heavy for that). I had no use for it at the time but stored it away, then later thought it might make a good, sturdy base for a shave horse (such as those on google mentioned above: http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/ ... 36&ct=mdcc ). Now I am working making bowls, something like Dave Fisher's excellent bowl horses, would likely make more sense. With the materials at hand, the design above may point the way :). Think I'll make a Robin Hood bowlmate first though - looks a bit easier (touch wood).

I was wondering whether I might be able to use tripod legs (instead of 4) for the bowl mate, so interesting to see that used above - although I'm pretty heavy these days, so (at least) 4 legs probably makes more sense for anything I expect to sit on! :D [Looks like it could do with a good drink of linseed oil.]

*Years ago I saw a TV program promoting the use of old pallets to make cheap furniture, such as futons and sofa beds. One of the tricks they suggested to smooth the splintery wood often found in pallets is to use a blow torch (they used a large BBQ sized gas container for theirs!) and a broad paint scraper/putty knife to burn and scrape the splinters off. Your mileage may vary...
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby woodeninjun » Mon Mar 19, 2012 8:23 pm

Hi Gavin ( I'll look at the Champion design) at the time I started making the cuddy I didn't have drill bits etc. I have since acquired three augurs about 3' long ( £8 at a car boot sale, rusty but working) although I don't think they would make a socket broad enough for a strong/big enough leg. I did want to make the sort of cuddy I had seen on this website. Pictures soon because my pal was visiting and took some on his 'phone which he will send to me and I'll try to add here.
Best bit at the moment is using it to make bits to improve it.
I'm really enjoying this thread.
All the best Alasdair
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby woodeninjun » Mon Mar 19, 2012 11:55 pm

Not the best picture Gavin I'll get another.
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby gavin » Tue Mar 20, 2012 8:26 am

woodeninjun wrote:Not the best picture Gavin I'll get another.

Try this with a bigger wedge under the tongue or plank on which your work sits. You have more muscles in your back and legs than your arms. If you can use the horse keeping your arms locked in a constant position ( roughly right-angle between upper and fore-arm) your work will flow more gloriously.

It is possible this horse is a bit short. Next one make the tongue's fixing point a little 10 -15 cm further away.
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby woodeninjun » Tue Mar 20, 2012 9:27 am

Thanks Gavin. I will be able to sit about a foot further back when I improve the leg angle. At present it could tip me off because the balance is off. I've had a look on your website and look forward to looking in on you as suggested there.
Alasdair.
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby Ian S » Tue Mar 20, 2012 8:39 pm

ToneWood wrote:Now I am working making bowls, something like Dave Fisher's excellent bowl horses, would likely make more sense. With the materials at hand, the design above may point the way :). Think I'll make a Robin Wood bowlmate first though - looks a bit easier (touch wood).


David's bowl horse is for working the exterior (with drawknives and spokeshaves) and Robin's bowlmate is for working the interior (with adzes and gouges).
How sharp is sharp enough?
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby ToneWood » Thu Mar 22, 2012 8:58 am

So, I need both?! Part of me relishes that and thinks "Great, two projects, 2 new toys!", the other part's heart sinks and thinks "Oh no, here we go again, always need more ->more cost, more clutter". Fortunately making it yourself makes the cost issue less of a concern.The old workmate-clone (see wet grinding/sharpening wheel thread for image) does a fair job of holding the bowl for the draw-knife - even though I should have tackled that before shaping the ends.

I have the day off and visiting the local hardware store's "lumber yard", using David Fisher's cutting list. Several problems cropped up:
a. it's in feet and inches - and British lumber is now in metric sizes
b. the normal, inexpensive "stud"/framing lengths found in the USA are not available, just 16ft lengths (or the metric eqivalent).
c. it is much more expensive than when I last bought timber in the USA (admittedly, some 2x4 framing studs were incredibly cheap in the USA, some maybe $2 for 7/8ft studs).

I reckon it would cost too much, £40-£55 ($75) for the 4 pieces closest to those specified by Dave (using "cheap" outdoor treated wood, rather than smooth finished lengths) - BUT that would be enough for 2 bowl horses! :D However, I've got 2 pieces of 2x12" "pitch pine in the garage - 5' & 3' - the longer piece about 2-3 inches shorted than the long piece specified by David Fisher but I think it would be long enough. So I may look at modifying the design to fit the timber available.

I found this link via David Fisher's excellent website: http://www.manytracks.com/Art/Bowls/InP ... e.htm#vise
Image
It's one of several holding devices used by a Michigan wood carver - who carves elaborate bowls and objets d'art: http://www.manytracks.com/Art/BowlsBySteve.htm
such as this:
Image
It includes some interesting ideas, like a rotating base, screwing the bowl/piece to the work surface (this had occurred to me already), ballast blocks to provide a stable base.

I don't aspire to that level of complexity in carving - I rather like simplicity - but it shows what is possible. He has made some rather nice spoons too ... and a variety of musical instruments! (Typical American over-achiever! :D ).
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Re: Shaving horses

Postby woodeninjun » Tue Apr 03, 2012 9:46 pm

A better picture of my shaving cuddy.
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