part 2: fitting an axe handle

discussion of anything related to tools

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

Re: part 2: fitting an axe handle

Postby Ian S » Wed May 04, 2011 7:26 pm

I've re-handled two Kents, and I've had the handle come all the way through the eye, and up to the top of the triangular cheeks as you call them (I have no idea what we should call them - lugs, maybe?). I then trim the handle in line with the lugs. I'd prefer to have the handle in contact with as much of the axe head as possible, and I also think that a handle which was not at least level with the top of the head, lugs, cheeks, whatever they're called, would look wrong....

Cheers
How sharp is sharp enough?
Ian S
Regular
 
Posts: 370
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 8:33 pm
Location: Edinburgh

Re: part 2: fitting an axe handle

Postby jrccaim » Mon May 06, 2013 5:55 am

Ian S wrote:I've re-handled two Kents, and I've had the handle come all the way through the eye, and up to the top of the triangular cheeks as you call them (I have no idea what we should call them - lugs, maybe?). I then trim the handle in line with the lugs. I'd prefer to have the handle in contact with as much of the axe head as possible, and I also think that a handle which was not at least level with the top of the head, lugs, cheeks, whatever they're called, would look wrong....

Cheers


Not only would it look wrong. It might actually work loose. Ask me how I know :) I trim axe handles so they protrude ohh 5mm beyond the head, then flush-cut them. When you are trimming there is a tendency (or at least I have a tendency) to taper the handle slightly. Going a bit too far is insurance against the head rocking on the handle. Make sure there is no room at all for the head to rock.
User avatar
jrccaim
Regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 3:53 am
Location: Willow, Alaska USA

Re: part 2: fitting an axe handle

Postby Billman » Fri Dec 12, 2014 5:46 pm

They are usually called cheeks in the manufacturers' catalogues (occasionally mis-spelt as checks) - Fussells, for example, offered, single cheek Yorkshire axes, and single check (sic) ships or Newcastle pattern axes..
Collector and restorer of old agricultural edge tools, especially billhooks
Billman
Regular
 
Posts: 540
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 3:51 pm
Location: South West Wiltshire

Previous

Return to Tools

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 3 guests