medieval "doloires" (broad axes)

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medieval "doloires" (broad axes)

Postby witt » Tue Jul 17, 2012 12:06 pm

As Monkeeboy and trollwumple asked for help with these types of axes, I started to get more interested in the subject and I got together material which might be of interest to them. (those axes can be forged now from an original model, with a nice inset of 1880 steel)
http://lespierresdusonge.over-blog.com/ ... 09530.html
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Re: medieval "doloires" (broad axes)

Postby ToneWood » Tue Jul 17, 2012 1:01 pm

I've seen a few old axes that look like that. They look interesting but what are they like to use? What are they good for? They appear to be designed for some very specific use (e.g. coopering/barrel/butt making). Some of them are surprisingly heavy. Most have very short handles and some/many are side axes. (And why does it describe them a "V. Gay" :D).
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Re: medieval "doloires" (broad axes)

Postby witt » Tue Jul 17, 2012 1:34 pm

Click on the link (in my previous post) and you may understand what they were useful for at that period of time.
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Re: medieval "doloires" (broad axes)

Postby bulldawg_65 » Tue Jul 17, 2012 7:18 pm

I've seen Doloires that look like figure A, D and F. By far the most common shape that I have seen is D and I am wondering from the way it is made and the shape of the haft if it might not be the forefather of the Dutch "goose winged" axe.
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Re: medieval "doloires" (broad axes)

Postby witt » Tue Jul 17, 2012 7:51 pm

The D type is common in Germany; Austria and spread into eastern Europe.
The A type is from the age of the Viking invasions and the settlement of this people.
the C type (that's why I've put the link) is commonly seen on the marks left on stones from buildings by carpenters in the early thirteen's century onwards.
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Re: medieval "doloires" (broad axes)

Postby monkeeboy » Tue Jul 17, 2012 8:04 pm

You've posted this in "Traders Corner".

Does that mean you're ready to start taking orders for them?

I know I want one, but it's so hard to know what pattern is best without having a go on one.
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Re: medieval "doloires" (broad axes)

Postby witt » Tue Jul 17, 2012 8:33 pm

No problem, we'll find a solution.
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Re: medieval "doloires" (broad axes)

Postby ToneWood » Mon Jul 23, 2012 7:58 pm

I notice Wille Sunqvist uses some very long bladed axes (probably side axes), not unlike these, in his book. For example, to flatten the top of a bowl blank and to put a flat base on the bottom.
Last edited by ToneWood on Tue Jul 24, 2012 2:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: medieval "doloires" (broad axes)

Postby anobium » Mon Jul 23, 2012 8:45 pm

I sold a 'cochoir' at the Bodgers' Ball this year; it is a coopers axe vaguely similar to 'A'. It was used to make grooves in the barrell to accommodate the bands of willow. It was bought by Sean Hellman, but I can look out for others if anyone is interested.
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Re: medieval "doloires" (broad axes)

Postby witt » Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:04 pm

Was it a "cochoir" or "cauchoir", or was it a "hachereau" ?

Thinking about Wille S., years ago I saw in a book written by Anders Mattson a picture of the tools of one of the most famous Swedish carvers now passed away. There were a knife, a hand-adze (very short handled), a draw knife and a doloire, that looked like a cooper's petite doloire or a clogmaker's doloire.
Some weeks ago, I found the same tool on sale on Swedish ebay. Here it is :
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Re: medieval "doloires" (broad axes)

Postby ToneWood » Tue Jul 24, 2012 2:35 pm

The Swedes like their short handles don't they.
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Re: medieval "doloires" (broad axes)

Postby witt » Wed Jul 25, 2012 2:05 pm

Not at all

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