Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby Doftya » Tue Feb 19, 2013 11:48 pm

I agree about not using chemically boiled oil, but here in Canada we have the 'Tried & True' brand which is actually boiled. I love the only warning on the label: ingestion of large quantities may cause nausea. The other option is to boil your own. Stephen Shepherd of the Full Chisel Blog has written a book on the topic of 18th c. finishes and discusses a number of means to boil you own raw lindseed oil. Mind you, if you're only painting the handle of the spoon, you might get away with using the modern blo.
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Re: Using W&N Artisan oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby ToneWood » Thu Feb 21, 2013 2:03 pm

ToneWood wrote:...Drying time depends on the pigment - for the ones I used, it should be dry to the touch in around 5 days - but 6-12 months to fully dry!

Well, 8 days later the paint is still very wet to the touch :(. I have it hanging up in the kitchen - which never gets particularly hot or cold. Unusually, it hasn't rained much this week either - so not as damp as usual - but my firewood & bonfire are all still v. damp :(. Perhaps I need to get the wood-burner fired up (hard work this year) and dry the spoon next to that - a little cracking/crazing might add character :).
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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby ToneWood » Wed Mar 06, 2013 8:58 pm

After 2 weeks the paint was still wet. Now, more than 3 weeks later...the oil paint is noticeably drier but still tacky enough to transfer to finger when touched. So, I would estimate the drying time for "dry to the touch" is likely to be 4 weeks or more, rather than the 5 days stated in W&N literature :(. However, I'm not in a hurry and prefer to avoid chemical drying agents (which are available for oil paints).
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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby ToneWood » Mon Mar 11, 2013 9:44 pm

3.5 weeks and it is was dry enough to remove masking tape:
Green spoon 2.1.jpg
An old lime/bass wood spoon that went wrong, so I use it for retrieving boiled eggs & practicing things on.
Green spoon 2.1.jpg (90.75 KiB) Viewed 7733 times
Green spoon 4 back blurry.jpg
Green spoon 4 back blurry.jpg (63.09 KiB) Viewed 7733 times
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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby ToneWood » Tue Apr 02, 2013 7:24 pm

AlexanderTheLate wrote:... On the subject of drying time, could you use acrylic paint? It drys much faster and is also cheaper.
It sure does - what a contrast in drying time to oil paints (my wife reckons it dries pretty much immediately & that you often need to add things to slow that down). I tried it out on a brush this weekend - inside a carved-out pattern, so it is somewhat protected. Very quick & easy. I applied the acrylic artists color with a fibre tip as I couldn't find a brush that I was willing to risk (although it washed off fine with water & soap).
Brush.jpg
Artists' acrylic paints, kindly provided by my son.
Brush.jpg (82.61 KiB) Viewed 7703 times
Last edited by ToneWood on Wed Apr 03, 2013 2:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby AlexanderTheLate » Wed Apr 03, 2013 12:24 am

I wonder if oiling over the painted surface will help preserve the paint when it is being washed? (Assuming you will be painting treen with it) Or will the paint stop the oil from soaking in? I will try this tomorrow, I have some wooden trouting plugs painted in acrylic to test on. :)
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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby ToneWood » Wed Apr 03, 2013 2:52 pm

After letting the acrylic paint dry for a short while, I oiled the brush with raw linseed oil. However, I didn't oil over the acrylic paint - I figured it was unnecessary. However, it's an interesting idea. I don't think the oil would soak through the acrylic paint but it might leave a protective (probably yellow-ish layer) on top. Walnut oil (from Tesco) would likely avoid the yellowing - although yellow might "warm" the colors underneath.

With the oil paints, I oiled the wood before painting it - as oil paints have a linseed oil base anyway (perhaps that slowed down the drying of my paint and/or perhaps the drying times assume that you are painting on a gessoed surface).
Last edited by ToneWood on Wed Apr 03, 2013 7:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby AlexanderTheLate » Wed Apr 03, 2013 3:49 pm

All right, I did a 'control test'. I had trout plugs (I made plenty, turning them on a pole lathe in an earlier experiment). I painted the wood (Birch) directly with acrylic paint, no primer or gesso. It dried for about a month before the test. Two were oiled with corn oil and two were left unoiled. I scrubbed them with hot, soapy water. The oil made no difference. The paint scraped off, did not smear but loosened enough that a finger nail could remove a small amount of paint.
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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby ToneWood » Wed Apr 03, 2013 7:44 pm

Disappointing :( That was my experience with acrylics on my diving fins & fishing lures, scratches off rather easily. Oil paint doesn't though :)
Still, I think acrylic might be viable and convenient for painting inside engraved/cut-out decoration, as the indents protect it from most normal abrasion.
Last edited by ToneWood on Thu Apr 04, 2013 12:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby AlexanderTheLate » Wed Apr 03, 2013 8:19 pm

True. I much prefer the wood's grain to a painted surface myself, though a bit of inlay or engraving looks grand. Now, I have a box of plugs that I can't use... :( I think I might try minwax over it. I will post results later, but I do not think minwax is food safe though. :)
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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby AlexanderTheLate » Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:26 pm

Min-wax (a generic varnish) is water proof. I did the test, only the find that it says so clearly on the tin... :oops: No scratches, no smudging, it works. Be careful about the food safe bit though, the one I had was, but don't take chances.
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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby ToneWood » Fri Apr 05, 2013 6:22 pm

I guess I am trying to avoid varnish, shellacs and polyurethane coatings - not sure exactly why. I expect they work better but I wanted something more natural/lower impact, without volatile solvents and carcinogen, and that does not require much clean-up. I can't claim any great purity though: obviously the pigments themselves can be pretty fancy chemicals and acrylics are certainly not natural.

One thing I like about a simple linseed oil finish is that it is easily maintained: if the finish is damaged or deteriorates, it can simply be re-oiled and then it is as good as new again.
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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby AlexanderTheLate » Fri Apr 05, 2013 7:42 pm

Since we have shifted away from oil paints, perhaps Milk paint is an idea? I understand what you mean about the varnish, that was just for curiosity. But like I said before, you will be hard put to match the beauty of the wood it's self. :)
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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby ToneWood » Fri Apr 12, 2013 9:49 pm

Or egg paint/tempura. Apparently egg can have some interesting waterproof/breathable properties.

Latest experiment, painted a couple of edge guards & a spoon with artists oil color, still drying. Artists oil color is rather thick and does tend to really clog up carved decoration:
Red Treen & salad scoop.jpg
The logo: Tree of Life :)
Red Treen & salad scoop.jpg (88.05 KiB) Viewed 7604 times

Although I now recall that the oils I am using can be easily thinned with water, until they dry. Doh! :D
BTW 'Couldn't find my stencil brush so took one of my sons old thick stubby toddler brushes and cut the top flat. V. pleased with the result: it looks & works just like a proper stencil brush :)
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Re: Using artists oil colours (paints) on wood

Postby bulldawg_65 » Sat Apr 13, 2013 9:48 pm

There are three or four good brands of Boiled Linseed oil that are safe for use on wooden kitchen ware as they are cold pressed and heated to remove protein. One such brand is Allback http://www.linoljeprodukter.se/eng/. I happen to use this product and it rocks!
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