Corn Oil

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Corn Oil

Postby AlexanderTheLate » Fri Mar 15, 2013 1:26 am

I am a fool. I picked up a container of what I thought was Canola Oil: what I normally use to finish my carvings. I finished several spoons with it, then had a closer look at the container- Corn Oil, not Canola. So my question is, does any one have any experience with this stuff? Does it polymerize? Will it go fousty? I will of course be watching my finished spoons closely, and hold off on finishing other things with this oil for a spell.
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Re: Corn Oil

Postby Davie Crockett » Fri Mar 15, 2013 8:54 am

Corn oil will polymerise, but not as well as linseed for example. Look for the iodine value (Google it to find a scale or table of different oils). The higher the Iodene value, the better it will polymerise.

Corn oil has a value of 112-120, Linseed has a value of 178-180.
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Re: Corn Oil

Postby ToneWood » Fri Mar 15, 2013 1:57 pm

Canola is just a brand name for a variety of edible rapeseed oil that has been developed for human/livestock consumption. Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canola I didn't think it, or corn oil for that matter, polymerized like, say, linseed oil, walnut oil and tung bean oil.

This link on "Drying Oils" covers suitable oils: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drying_oil
A drying oil is an oil that hardens to a tough, solid film after a period of exposure to air. The oil hardens through a chemical reaction in which the components crosslink by the action of oxygen (not through the evaporation of water or other solvents) ... Some commonly used drying oils include linseed (flax seed) oil, tung oil, poppy seed oil, perilla oil, and walnut oil....

Since oxidation is the key to curing in these oils, those that are susceptible to chemical drying are often unsuitable for cooking, and are also highly susceptible to becoming rancid due to autoxidation, the process by which fatty foods develop off-flavors.[1] Rags, cloth, and paper saturated with drying oils may combust spontaneously (ignite) in a few hours, due to accumulation of heat released during the oxidation process.


I'd never heard of Iodine number before Davie's post but the above link describes it thus:
Oils with an iodine number greater than 130 are considered drying, those with an iodine number of 115-130 are semi-drying, and those with an iodine number of less than 115 are non-drying.

And if you check wiki's page on Iodine Number: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iodine_number,
Corn oil (iodine number 109 – 133) covers all 3 categories :D
Canola (Iodine value-110–120) is semi-drying - non-drying [ref. http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/canola-oil.html ]
Walnut Oil( Iodine Value. 132-153) -drying
Linseed oil( 170 – 204) - drying*****
Tung oil (Iodine Value: 163 max) - drying
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Re: Corn Oil

Postby AlexanderTheLate » Fri Mar 15, 2013 6:48 pm

I have always found Canola good for finishing, though requiring re-oiling every so often (a result of being semi-drying?). Seems Corn oil is a bit better to use. Thank you to both of you, both for the answers and for the helpful information on oils.

It is grand what a quick search can do isn't it? Why couldn't I think to do that?
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Re: Corn Oil

Postby ToneWood » Fri Mar 15, 2013 8:03 pm

:) This way we all learn something new ;)
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Re: Corn Oil

Postby arborrider » Wed Mar 20, 2013 12:36 am

Interesting posts. Have been using walnut oil purchased from a local food co-op. It's priced lower per volume than the certified organic linseed oil. But the lower iodine value(iv) of walnut oil has me thinking about making a change to linseed oil. Does a better polymerizing oil mean a more durable and/or water resistant finish? If so, is the linseed iv of ~170 vs. walnut iv of ~130 going to make a real world significant difference?

Past trips to the Northshore of Maui I would stop into a hemp store located in the town of Paia. Promotion & education of hemp & hemp products made for an interesting visit. Fiber for fabric, cordage. Oil for fuel, dietary supplements (high in omega 3 & 6 essential fatty acids), wood finish. Just googled iodine value for hemp oil. iv ~160. The region I live at one time was a major source for hemp. Today in the USA it's not legal to grow even low % THC hemp. Fiber varieties of hemp have ~0.2% THC content. Sad. A agricultural product that can yield fiber & oil. Requires minimum inputs to grow. Imagine that gallon of hemp oil in the pantry. Dietary supplement, cooking oil, biodiesel for the auto/tractor and wood finish for your projects.
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Re: Corn Oil

Postby AlexanderTheLate » Wed Mar 20, 2013 12:49 am

I would not bother changing oil. I used to use Canola oil, I now, of course, use Corn Oil. It finishes beautifully, and has a lower iodine value then Walnut oil. Linseed oil, for me means a four hour trip to St. Johns, and a stop at the hippie store. The joys of Rural Newfoundland.
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