English terms

Share experience of timbers and other greenwood materials - learn by other people's mistakes and triumphs.

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

English terms

Postby Jan Krobot » Sat Feb 28, 2015 5:50 am

Hi
I have bit chaos in terms SOFTWOOD and HARDWOOD. In texts i read it seems to me as basic division of wood. Do these terms relate simply to softness or hardness of wood?
Or do they refer to wood of conifers (softwood) and board-leaved trees (hardwood) as i know it from czech?
Thanks
Jan
Jan Krobot
Regular
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2015 3:58 pm
Location: Rovensko, Czech Republic

Re: English terms

Postby woodness sake » Sat Feb 28, 2015 2:58 pm

"they refer to wood of conifers (softwood) and board-leaved trees (hardwood) as i know it" Generally, this is correct, although there are some broad-leaved species that are quite soft and some conifers that are quite hard.
As I gain experience with trees and wood, I take what I have learned as to the characteristics of identification, uses, and workability for the different woods I encounter and make my own book. I have books that show me what I can expect to find, especially for identification and uses, but not all of this information is about trees I have available in my part of the world. This learning and gathering, to me, is part of the wonder of wood work.
User avatar
woodness sake
Regular
 
Posts: 194
Joined: Sat Jun 28, 2008 9:59 pm
Location: hartly, Delaware USA

Re: English terms

Postby ToneWood » Sat Feb 28, 2015 8:04 pm

woodness sake wrote:...although there are some broad-leaved species that are quite soft and some conifers that are quite hard...

Balsa wood is an extreme case of this: it is classified as a hardwood but is particularly soft & light (and is also considered a "tone wood"). Conversely yew is quite hard yet is considered a softwood.
ToneWood
Regular
 
Posts: 1846
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 2:21 pm

Re: English terms

Postby Jan Krobot » Mon Mar 02, 2015 9:37 am

...there are some broad-leaved species that are quite soft and some conifers that are quite hard...

That's what caused my confusion:) If I read for example about lime (which is one of the softest wood I know) being hardwood, it was starnge and I knew I need an explanaition of it. And you gave me such an explanation:) Thank you
And i agree that learning characteristics of wood is beautiful
Jan Krobot
Regular
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2015 3:58 pm
Location: Rovensko, Czech Republic

Re: English terms

Postby Jan Krobot » Mon Mar 02, 2015 5:14 pm

And one more. What exactly is COPPICE? Is it any stick-like young tree?
Jan Krobot
Regular
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2015 3:58 pm
Location: Rovensko, Czech Republic

Re: English terms

Postby Peat » Mon Mar 02, 2015 9:21 pm

Coppicing is the process of cutting trees low to the ground. Most... hardwoods will re-shoot from the stump, resulting in lots of straight, similar sized poles (well, this is the aim). You can repeat this regularly on the same stool (the name for the stump once it has been coppiced), cutting on a cycle of a number of years, usually between 6 and 20 depending on the species and desired product. You can carry on doing this for ever!
User avatar
Peat
Regular
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 4:13 pm
Location: Nr Stroud

Re: English terms

Postby Jan Krobot » Wed Mar 11, 2015 12:13 pm

Hi
I'd like to ask about english terms used for different parts of wood. I mean outer light rim, inner dark core and very center of the wood (first year of its growth).

And how you call two different directions of cutting wood, I mean direction perpendicular to fibres and one along the fibres.

Díky
Jan
Jan Krobot
Regular
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2015 3:58 pm
Location: Rovensko, Czech Republic

Re: English terms

Postby ToneWood » Wed Mar 11, 2015 2:08 pm

Hi Jan,
Soft Centre=pith,
next out=heartwood, then
sapwood, then
bark.
Image Image
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wood#Heartwood_and_sapwood
ToneWood
Regular
 
Posts: 1846
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 2:21 pm

Re: English terms

Postby Jan Krobot » Thu Mar 12, 2015 8:55 pm

Hi,
what is the meaning of BURR in wood terms? Dictionary doesn't give any usable translation.
Cheers
Jan
Jan Krobot
Regular
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2015 3:58 pm
Location: Rovensko, Czech Republic

Re: English terms

Postby Simon Hartley » Sun Mar 15, 2015 1:47 am

Cutting across the grain is called crosscutting. Cutting along the grain is called ripping.

A bur (or burr) is part of a tree which has had lots of shoots growing out of a small area, so the wood ends up being full of tiny knots.
Simon Hartley
Regular
 
Posts: 69
Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 12:28 pm


Return to Materials knowledge

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests