cotton or polypropylene tape for seat tops

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cotton or polypropylene tape for seat tops

Postby gavin » Tue Dec 04, 2012 10:07 pm

I want to weave seat tops FAST.
I looked here: http://www.supplydivision.com and I now have a short list of:

    1. Polypropylene webbing : Strong, plain & herringbone ("seatbelt type")weave polypropylene webbing. Sometimes seen on sports-bag handles & lorry curtain-siders.
    2. Poly-Acrylic twill tape: Soft, Polyester/Acrylic twill("seat-belt pattern") webbing. Bag handles and binding.
    3. Cotton tape

Which is best for seat tops?
Has any one compared items 1, 2 or 3 for seat tops? I reckon they work out around £2 or £3 per stool

I suppose cotton tape may change tension with ambient humidity changes. But that's just my armchair theorist at work. So I thought I'd ask if any one knows.
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Re: cotton or polypropylene tape for seat tops

Postby Davie Crockett » Thu Dec 06, 2012 10:13 am

Hi Gavin.

I've only used the cotton twill webbing (Black and white herringbone) and heavy canvas/sackcloth/jute webbing as support for springs in fully upholstered chairs. Each piece is stretched and secured individually.

Question: What width of tape do you intend to use? I ask because the standard 2" width will not weave very well unless you secure and cut it at each pass. you'll then have a cosmetic issue with the finished product. You'll then have to devise a way of covering the ends. Synthetic tapes will need heat sealing to prevent excessive fraying.

Shaker tape is around 3/4" wide and will conform to a certain amount of lateral skewing so that it can be woven in a continuous piece.

It is possible to make your own shaker tape on an Inkle loom but I guess this flies in the face of your quick turnaround ethos. There is a company in Midlothian who sell shaker tape, also Ashem crafts, still probably a lot more expensive than 2" webbing.

Have a look at this thread: http://www.bodgers.org.uk/bb/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=2365&p=18468&hilit=shaker+tape#p18468
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Re: cotton or polypropylene tape for seat tops

Postby gavin » Thu Dec 06, 2012 12:15 pm

Davie Crockett wrote:
I've only used the cotton twill webbing (Black and white herringbone) and heavy canvas/sackcloth/jute webbing as support for springs in fully upholstered chairs. Each piece is stretched and secured individually.

Question: What width of tape do you intend to use?

Width: 25 mm and I just placed a trial order of £65 for two rolls - I'll report soon.

If your jute or twill webbing above were woven in a continuous band ( i,e, not fixed to the seat rail on each strip by a metal fastener e.g. staple or nail) : would that then stretch too much over time and so sag?
Gavin Phillips


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Re: cotton or polypropylene tape for seat tops

Postby Davie Crockett » Thu Dec 06, 2012 12:32 pm

I've re-covered some ancient chairs and the webbing has been loose, but that was down to wear and tear over about a 60 year period. Generally if you pre load the tension to about 10-15 lbs it doesn't stretch much beyond that until it fails at whatever it's breaking strain is. If you use a webbing strainer, you can pretty much guarantee it won't sag unless a) Your frame "gives". b) your webbing isn't designed for this purpose or goes outside the parameters of its intended use range (Temp, humidity etc).

Webbing strainers are really easy to make from scraps of hard wood. They're about 12" long by 3.5" to 4" wide, the aperture is 2" by 3/4"
webbing strainer.JPG
Simple webbing strainer
webbing strainer.JPG (13.1 KiB) Viewed 4146 times
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