Leg Jottings

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Leg Jottings

Postby Stanford Peverill » Sat Feb 27, 2016 10:36 am

New to chair making after being seriously inflected by the 'virus' last year, several weeks ago I turned a set of legs and spindles for a chair from green ash. The legs were not that elaborate in design, a couple of beads turned at the top of the leg and one at the base near the foot. I weighed each of the four legs registered a little over 2 lbs. on the kitchen scales and I put them in the airing cupboard for a few weeks to 'dry'. I took them out the other day and re-weighed them and was astonished to discover that each leg had lost an average of 7 ounces, the loss being equivalent to a full whisky glass of water. It was also remarkable to see the shape of each leg and the way it had distorted in shape depending on the size of the bead on each leg. The thicker the bead the more apparent the distortion from the round. So I guess that the simpler the leg in its design the less distortion takes place. As a novice I am now beginning to understand the way in which grain moves and the forces and stresses involved in the drying process. I have read much on this in theses pages and found that side of green wood work fascinating and clearly a 'science' in its own right. A really good learning experience on my part and I thought I would just share my experience. Would value comments on this topic.
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Re: Leg Jottings

Postby Robin Fawcett » Wed Mar 16, 2016 5:25 pm

The distortion has more to do with the speed that the wood has grown than any design elements. If you turn fast-grown ash, say 5 to 6 growth rings per inch, it will go much more oval than slow-grown stuff, say 15 to 20 growth rings per inch - BUT remember the fast-grown stuff will be stronger...
http://www.facebook.com/GreenWoodwork?ref=tn_tnmn[url=http://www.treewright.co.uk/]
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Re: Leg Jottings

Postby gavin » Fri Mar 18, 2016 10:49 am

Stanford Peverill wrote: As a novice I am now beginning to understand the way in which grain moves and the forces and stresses involved in the drying process. I have read much on this in theses pages and found that side of green wood work fascinating and clearly a 'science' in its own right. A really good learning experience on my part and I thought I would just share my experience. Would value comments on this topic.


Have you bought Mike Abbott's various books? If not, they will save many hours of finding out for yourself what is well-known amongst this community. They were my starting point.
Have you been on any courses? ( if not, do get to Bodgers Ball 2016 where mini-courses will run - or go see some person local to you.)
Have you joined APTGW?
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Re: Leg Jottings

Postby Stanford Peverill » Thu Mar 24, 2016 10:55 pm

Thanks for that Robin useful information about fast growing material
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Re: Leg Jottings

Postby Stanford Peverill » Thu Mar 24, 2016 10:58 pm

Thanks Gavin - that a resounding yes to all three questions and I have the stickers to prove it!!! Will check out the Bodgers Ball as well - looking forward to the visit.
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