7 kuksa in 7 days

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7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby Baggy » Wed Apr 04, 2012 8:07 pm

7 kuksa in 7 days in different styles ........... that was the plan but it actually took 12 days, must get quicker.

I would appreciate comments and critiques.

Image
Last edited by Baggy on Sun Jun 03, 2012 1:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby gavin » Wed Apr 04, 2012 9:14 pm

How do you shape the handles ? Looking at the grain pattern in several of them, I think you must have steamed them??
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Re: 7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby Rich Dyson » Wed Apr 04, 2012 10:20 pm

Great stuff.
Please will you post a photo of the tools used?
Thanks
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Re: 7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby Steve Martin » Thu Apr 05, 2012 6:02 am

Awesome!
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Re: 7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby Baggy » Thu Apr 05, 2012 9:31 am

Hiya

gavin wrote:How do you shape the handles ? Looking at the grain pattern in several of them, I think you must have steamed them??


No steaming just carving.............. mind you steaming is an interesting idea
Last edited by Baggy on Thu Apr 05, 2012 9:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby Baggy » Thu Apr 05, 2012 9:32 am

Steve Martin wrote:Awesome!


Thanks Steve

I am working on developing a style and it seems I have to see what does not work to understand what does.

I think from the batch above I can see two styles developing :-)
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Re: 7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby nic » Thu Apr 05, 2012 10:13 am

Hi Mark- Just realised this is in Beginners corner I am sure you have progressed from there!

Critique/ Comments- I like the tooled one, would be interested to see how it looks oiled. However as you say If you are looking to sell and the customers prefer sanded it is largely irrelevant.

As I said on BCUK tow bottom right are my favourites,

1. I like the idea that the handles touche the floor and stabilise the Kuksa, suppose the flat handle does make for an even more stable platform in this respect.

2. Like the fact that the handles have a more delicate feel on these two due to a thinner stem.

3. Prefer the salmon tail , but not the snout to the front ( although that adds to the fish motif)


So on balance I can't decide which of the two I prefer- Definately think these two are the way to go if developing your own style.
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Re: 7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby Baggy » Thu Apr 05, 2012 4:07 pm

Hi Nic

nic wrote:Hi Mark- Just realised this is in Beginners corner I am sure you have progressed from there!

Maybe :-)

nic wrote:Critique/ Comments-

Just what I hoped for, thanks for taking the time.

nic wrote:I like the tooled one, would be interested to see how it looks oiled.

This one? I don't think of this as finished I want to make some finishing cuts instead of sanding....
Image




nic wrote:However as you say If you are looking to sell and the customers prefer sanded it is largely irrelevant.

The problem is that I hate sanding!!!


nic wrote:So on balance I can't decide which of the two I prefer- Definately think these two are the way to go if developing your own style.

Thanks for that Nic, I have posted the kuksas elsewhere and those two images seem to be popular because of the handles, I worry slightly about the strength of the handle....

The bowl shapes have not been mentioned once, strangely I think that the bowl of the kuksa top right is worth developing as is the huksa bowl bottom right
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Re: 7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby Baggy » Thu Apr 05, 2012 8:58 pm

Rich Dyson wrote:Great stuff.
Please will you post a photo of the tools used?
Thanks
Rich

I will take one soon
Best wishes
Mark
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Re: 7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby Steve Martin » Fri Apr 06, 2012 3:42 am

I tend to use rasps followed by scraping in lieu of sanding with either flax seed or walnut oil. I'm not sure what you mean by developing a style. When deciding how to develop a particular "blank", I try to look at the shape of the blank, the flow of the grain, knots or other characteristics that can be used in the final design. For example, some grain patterns seem to want a round bowl, other patterns look better with an oval shape. As you probably know, some wood species tend to dry in a pattern that emphasizes an oblong shape. You can use that info to highlight the flow of the grain pattern in the bowl and through the handle. I think its fun to try to predict what I can get if I change the orientation of the piece in the blank. Some times I get what I expect, sometimes not, sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. Every blank is a new adventure in reading the wood which I think is just as important as worrying about a style, which will evolve as you become a better reader.
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Re: 7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby nic » Fri Apr 06, 2012 10:51 am

Steve Martin wrote:I tend to use rasps followed by scraping in lieu of sanding with either flax seed or walnut oil. I'm not sure what you mean by developing a style. When deciding how to develop a particular "blank", I try to look at the shape of the blank, the flow of the grain, knots or other characteristics that can be used in the final design. For example, some grain patterns seem to want a round bowl, other patterns look better with an oval shape. As you probably know, some wood species tend to dry in a pattern that emphasizes an oblong shape. You can use that info to highlight the flow of the grain pattern in the bowl and through the handle. I think its fun to try to predict what I can get if I change the orientation of the piece in the blank. Some times I get what I expect, sometimes not, sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. Every blank is a new adventure in reading the wood which I think is just as important as worrying about a style, which will evolve as you become a better reader.


Thats such a different point of view to mine; I will decide what I want to make; then select the wood that will do accommodate that; I often pay only lip service to the grain as well if I am honest. So for me form is everything; and the form(s) I choose to make is my style. This approach is no doubt born from my work as a blacksmith where the initial stock I choose to use has little bearing on the final form.

To some extent though I think we are saying the same thing- The way you read the grain of the wood and how your interpretation influences the final form gives rise to your style, even if it is unconscious.
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Re: 7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby Baggy » Fri Apr 06, 2012 12:50 pm

When I say style I am actuality looking to improve the functionality and the style is a big part of this.

The kuksa should hold enough coffee, stand well, be easy to hold, easy to drink from, insulate well, it should be tough enough to travel in a rucksack etc. From this thinking it is mainly the bowl of the kuksa I am developing.

One the functionality is right the style and look can be developed around it.
Best wishes
Mark
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Re: 7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby ToneWood » Mon Apr 09, 2012 10:42 pm

Finish-wise, I pefer the first one, with the cut edges - but I admire the smoothly finished ones because that's what the women in my life keep telling to do :(. I quite like its fan "tail" too.

Visually, I love the "whale tail" handle (#2) and #4 (the grain in the fan tail is just perfect - looks quite practical too)
and the tail of #6 is quite interesting - not sure if I like the pointed "bow" but they seem to go together to give the subtle impression of a bird (or is that me doing an ink-blot test on it?!).

Ever thought about doing a longer, chunkier handle - I guess that's how I picture a drinking pitcher/ladle (probably from old cowboy westerns).

The whale tail (and the bird) would make a great design for a smaller egg cup (you could then buy it for the kids but use it yourself ;)).

The one I would most like to own is #4 - it's pretty much perfect.
Followed by 6, the bird. Then 2 the whale tail.

You seem to use the orange as your size guide - any particular reason why? I would be tempted to make various sizes, including quite large ones. You are very consistent on size - is it something to do with the tools or technique you use?

#5 & #3 remind me of the modernist Scandinavian bent wood furniture widely used in Britain, especially in schools, in the 1970s. Perhaps that's what prompted Gavin's question on steaming. They would likely appeal to somebody with a modernist/Scandinavian/70s tastes (including viewers of Wallander and Grand Designs, and Ikea customers perhaps :D).
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Re: 7 kuksa in 7 days

Postby Baggy » Tue Apr 10, 2012 1:27 pm

Hiya

Thanks for taking the time to critique :-)

ToneWood wrote:Finish-wise, I prefer the first one, with the cut edges - but I admire the smoothly finished ones because that's what the women in my life keep telling to do :(. I quite like its fan "tail" too.

The tooled finish I what I aspire to and that one has a way to go, but it seems that sanded finishes sell better, ho hum.

ToneWood wrote:Visually, I love the "whale tail" handle (#2) and #4 (the grain in the fan tail is just perfect - looks quite practical too)

I was planning to come up with one style to work on but I like too may of the handles and will probably vary them to suit the wood.


ToneWood wrote:and the tail of #6 is quite interesting - not sure if I like the pointed "bow" but they seem to go together to give the subtle impression of a bird (or is that me doing an ink-blot test on it?!).

Most people have seen a fish there :-)
The "nose" has not been that popular so will probably not appear on future

ToneWood wrote:Ever thought about doing a longer, chunkier handle - I guess that's how I picture a drinking pitcher/ladle (probably from old cowboy westerns).

Like this one ?
http://carvedfromwood.blogspot.co.uk/


ToneWood wrote: The one I would most like to own is #4 - it's pretty much perfect.

And it is Brandy size :-)

ToneWood wrote:Followed by 6, the bird. Then 2 the whale tail.


ToneWood wrote:You seem to use the orange as your size guide - any particular reason why? I would be tempted to make various sizes, including quite large ones. You are very consistent on size - is it something to do with the tools or technique you use?

The orange is there for potential buyers to judge the size visually....
This particular batch came from the same trunk which set the size, I have made and do make a variety of sizes.

Pssst, no one else seems to be listening, I have started building a web shop here
http://www.handcarvedfromwood.co.uk/index.html
much to do before it is finished


ToneWood wrote:#5 & #3 remind me of the modernist Scandinavian bent wood furniture widely used in Britain, especially in schools, in the 1970s. Perhaps that's what prompted Gavin's question on steaming. They would likely appeal to somebody with a modernist/Scandinavian/70s tastes (including viewers of Wallander and Grand Designs, and Ikea customers perhaps :D).

my first thought when I finished it was Ikea :-)
Best wishes
Mark
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