Teaching woodworking at a Waldorf school.

When you are starting out there are a lot of questions. Ask them here!

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

Teaching woodworking at a Waldorf school.

Postby Mario Soldevilla » Thu Aug 22, 2013 3:48 pm

Hello all,

First post here so I will give a brief intro. I live in South Florida have been woodworking now for about 7 years mostly handtool stuff, and 2 years ago found myself buying up old axes really getting into the green woodorking. In all this time I have also been a stay at home dad and now have my kids at school, freeing up some time to do some work.

I have now picked up a job teaching woodwork once a week at a very small Waldorf school near me.The ages will range from 10 years old to 14 years old with maybe 12-15 kids. The woodwork program is pretty new and they are looking to me to help shape the curriculum. We will be meeting next week to discuss our plan. Here is what I want to cover:
Safety
Tools
Tool care and Maintenance
Sharpening
Sloyd
Wood

While I don't have any specific question I would like any advice that could be helpful to someone teaching this for the first time.

Thank you for your help, I have found this forum a rich source of information in learning the craft and inspiration to create beautiful handmade objects.

Mario
Mario Soldevilla
new member
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2012 10:03 pm

Re: Teaching woodworking at a Waldorf school.

Postby mstibs » Thu Aug 22, 2013 8:18 pm

I've been teaching computer topics since 1997 and 2 months ago I gave my first pole lathe course. My students are usually adults. The Waldorf schools are all about creativity and self controlled learning as I remember.

I'd start with a raw piece of wood and ask each student what he sees in there... or better: they should paint what they see in it/would like to make from it on paper. I'd pin all paintings to a board and discuss with them, what would be a good starter project. You can lead the discussion to the project that a) is a good starter project with few and easy basic techniques involved, b) teaches the students a good share of knowledge, c) leads to relatively quick success (motivation) and d) is suited to the age of the kids and your own liking.

My next step would be discussing all the steps involved with the students ... informing them about the theroretical, boring but necessary topics like tools, safety, the wood you'll be using, etc. The logical order of the steps is important, so try this with an imaginary test project and discuss it with someone who already wrote a curriculum - i.e. the teachers at the school! I'd write/draw/paint then (using an underlying image everyone understands ... maybe a road) the plan to a big poster together with the students (everyone contributes a picture you can glue to the poster) and pin it to a wall where it stays until the project is finished. This plan will guide the kids and yourself through the first lessons. Each completed step gets a fat check mark that the students see their progress. Id prepare the first lesson with my own introduction, the above described things and some interesting theoretical knowledge if there is still time left to fill.

Good luck!
Michael

PS: One more good experience to share. Don't treat them as the kids they are, treat them as equals.
Saxons. Were good wood-turners, they had to be because they were poor potters...from "A Short History of Woodturning with the Pole-lathe" by Brian G. Howarth; My bilingual (de/en) Blog: http://mstibs.wordpress.com
User avatar
mstibs
Regular
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Dresden/Saxony/Germany

Re: Teaching woodworking at a Waldorf school.

Postby mstibs » Fri Aug 23, 2013 4:34 am

The two free following books show you methods to teach woodworking techniques.
The original "Handbook of Slöjd" by Otto Salomon: http://www.archive.org/stream/teachersb ... 5/mode/2up and "Manual Instruction, Woodwork, (the English Sloyd)": http://archive.org/details/manualinstructio00bartrich by S. Barter.

Cheers!
STIBS
Saxons. Were good wood-turners, they had to be because they were poor potters...from "A Short History of Woodturning with the Pole-lathe" by Brian G. Howarth; My bilingual (de/en) Blog: http://mstibs.wordpress.com
User avatar
mstibs
Regular
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Dresden/Saxony/Germany

Re: Teaching woodworking at a Waldorf school.

Postby Mario Soldevilla » Fri Aug 23, 2013 2:15 pm

Thank you MIchael, this is good info to start with. I like your idea of planning the class along with the students, this should fit well with the waldorf curriculum. I certainly believe in treating my students as equals and feel they will have just as much to teach me as I will have to teach them( tho they may not know it).

Thank you for the links as I am currently soaking up all things sloyd, and am finding it to be very appropriate to waldorf education.

Any other instructors out there who have some tips for some one new to teaching these skills? Chime in, any and all advice is greatly appreciated.

Mario
Mario Soldevilla
new member
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2012 10:03 pm

Re: Teaching woodworking at a Waldorf school.

Postby tagnut69 » Fri Aug 23, 2013 4:51 pm

What is a waldorf school? is it special
tagnut69
Regular
 
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed Sep 16, 2009 8:30 am

Re: Teaching woodworking at a Waldorf school.

Postby ToneWood » Fri Aug 23, 2013 8:52 pm

Never heard of it but found this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waldorf_education
I was impressed by the Montessori approach that my son experienced at Kindergarten, in the USA.
ToneWood
Regular
 
Posts: 1846
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 2:21 pm

Re: Teaching woodworking at a Waldorf school.

Postby R.Sixsmith » Mon Sep 02, 2013 8:12 pm

hi,
If you get in touch with Freeman College in Sheffield,this college is a Steiner College working with students with learning difficulties.
I worked there teaching Country Crafts and Green wood working .They will help you put together a package for teaching safely>
Regards Ralph Sixsmith MBE
R.Sixsmith
Regular
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2009 9:00 pm


Return to Beginner's corner

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 4 guests

cron