Green woodworking for Learning Disabilities

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Green woodworking for Learning Disabilities

Postby poomwood » Fri Oct 18, 2013 2:38 am

Hi All
After being paid off from my day job (boo, yeah or somewhere in between) I have accepted an invitation to mentor some adults with learning disabilities with Daybreak at Ministeracres near Consett, Co. Durham.
Misteracres is an old Victorian Estate and there is an active restoration of the woodland providing a plentiful supply of fresh timber.
Daybreak have a lease on the walled garden within Ministeracres where they offer work experience to Adults with Learning Disabilities.
So far the wood working group have made Bird Boxes, restored some very old and lovely furniture and made some willow structures for the garden.
I am very keen to offer them some opportunities to make things from real trees and branches that they can sell at their christmas and summer fates.
My portfolio so far consists of coat hooks made from a suitable branch and buttons made from cross sections of dried twigs. I am also hoping to make them a Shave Horse so they can make gipsy flowers.
I was just wondering if any other members had other suggestions for Green Woodworking projects for these guys or have had experience in working in this sector.
Kindest regards
Tim
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Re: Green woodworking for Learning Disabilities

Postby gavin » Fri Oct 18, 2013 7:20 am

Refer any book by Ray Tabor - he lists many projects and offers patterns with measurements.
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Re: Green woodworking for Learning Disabilities

Postby poomwood » Sun Oct 20, 2013 12:36 am

Thanks Gavin
I wonder why I haven't come across these books before. I still have a lot to learn I guess.
I can see;
The Green Woodworking Pattern book - Over 300 traditional craft designs
The Encyclopaedia of Green Woodworking
Guide to the techniques of coppice management
and Traditional Woodland Crafts.
Every one sounds very interesting and I'm guessing I cannot go wrong with any of them. Just a guess mind.

The Green Woodworking Pattern Book? I must be able to find something in there.
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Re: Green woodworking for Learning Disabilities

Postby gavin » Mon Oct 21, 2013 8:32 am

poomwood wrote:Thanks Gavin
I wonder why I haven't come across these books before. I still have a lot to learn I guess.
I can see;
The Green Woodworking Pattern book - Over 300 traditional craft designs
The Encyclopaedia of Green Woodworking
Guide to the techniques of coppice management
and Traditional Woodland Crafts.
Every one sounds very interesting and I'm guessing I cannot go wrong with any of them. Just a guess mind.

The Green Woodworking Pattern Book? I must be able to find something in there.

If I were you I would buy the lot. They are rare and hard to get. Contact me if you have any spare as a pal of mine Rolf Buwert wants them too.
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Re: Green woodworking for Learning Disabilities

Postby Lozzuck » Wed Oct 23, 2013 8:07 pm

Hi Poomwood
I also work at a Daycentre for Adults with learning disabilities https://www.facebook.com/TheRossendaleTrust?fref=ts. I found that using the shave horse with a draw knife was a bit scary at times depending on the user of course, although much enjoyment was achieved building it. Much more successful was using the pole lathe, which we also built. The fact that when you stop treading the lathe stops was a great asset (especially when I have to do the risk assessments) Good Luck
Lozzuck
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Re: Green woodworking for Learning Disabilities

Postby poomwood » Sun Oct 27, 2013 11:59 am

I thought I might start with and end product and work backwards so I bought in some spoons/ spatulas and some coat hooks which were in various states of progress.
They started by sanding the ones that were ready while I did some more knife work just to show them how it was done.
We then oiled the spoons and attached the coat hooks to a board with screws. I thought this might be a bit boring for them but they absolutely loved it. And I think it was working with the natural shaped wood that was so appealing. I brought along a branch and we looked at things we could make from it so they could see where the coat hooks and spoons came from, but at the end of the day they got some finished products.
When I go back this week I hope to bring along some less finished things so they can get more involved but to do that we will need to do the risk assessments.
Lozzuck. Do you have any more info on this? My boss will be doing them but I'm not really sure what she needs to do them. Is it like documenting the process?
I've tried removing the bark with a tattie peeler but thats not really working so I was thinking of a safety knife. I have one of these which works well.
http://www.greenmanbushcraft.co.uk/forest-schools/opinel-no-7-round-tipped-safety-knife.htm
Now does anybody make a Safety Axe?
I have come across some timber I may be able to aquire to make a shave horse and lathe, so long term that would be great. I can bring my own along for now though.
I'm also thinking along the lines of dowel cutters, tapered tenons and wooden screws as these tools are very safe to use. It's just what to make with them
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Re: Green woodworking for Learning Disabilities

Postby gavin » Mon Oct 28, 2013 7:52 pm

poomwood wrote:I'm also thinking along the lines of dowel cutters, tapered tenons and wooden screws as these tools are very safe to use. It's just what to make with them

I strongly recommend dowel cutters.
Mount a drill horizontally as in this suggestion.
Use that horizontal drill for drilling holes in pencil blanks - refer this video for how I do it.
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