hello

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hello

Postby safronsue » Thu Nov 14, 2013 6:54 am

Hi,
may i introduce myself? Sue, a Brightonite, living in rural Northern Greece on a small holding with a great selection of fruit and nut trees. Looking through this website and at the beautiful things people make has me wondering whether i should have a go. And there is this walnut that really needs to go as it's shading the veggies and having bad effects on the toms. I would love to make a spoon or anything with it and i'm thinking about what minimum tools i should buy online to start off. The tree is quite big, about 6 inches diameter at the bottom of the trunk. What could be made from it by a master greenwoodworker i wonder.
safronsue
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Re: hello

Postby gavin » Thu Nov 14, 2013 10:04 am

safronsue wrote: Looking through this website and at the beautiful things people make has me wondering whether i should have a go.

Course you should! Spend more time on tools and less time online. But do also join https://www.facebook.com/groups/GreenWoodWork/ which is is a very active resource.
Buy
1. The Little Book of Whittling by Chris Lubkeman
2. Any book by Mike Abbott, or preferably all of them
3. Subscribe to Living Woods magazine - it'll cost £18 p.a. for 6 issues
4. Know how to sharpen your edges.

Also if you can, meet up with others e.g.
5. Go to Bodgers Ball held in UK 2nd weekend in May each year. Next is in or near Sherwood Forest in 2014
6. Go to Spoonfest near Sheffield approx Aug each year. [/list]

safronsue wrote: And there is this walnut that really needs to go as it's shading the veggies and having bad effects on the toms. I would love to make a spoon or anything with it and i'm thinking about what minimum tools i should buy online to start off. .

A small ax from car boot sale ( £2?), a bow saw , Frost 120 knife approx £15- 20 , and Frost 164 knife approx £20-22. Make a sheath for the ax, and sharpen the ax razor sharp.

safronsue wrote: The tree is quite big, about 6 inches diameter at the bottom of the trunk. What could be made from it by a master greenwoodworker i wonder.

I'd start with some smaller diameter, soft timber. Learn the basic cuts. Could be a bit hard for you there in rural Greece, but you can do it. Folks have carved longer than they have read. If you can, get Wille Sundqvist's Swedish Carving Techniques - which I note is to be re-published in Dec. If you read German, it is available NOW as Schwedische Schnitzschule

And if you are in Scotland last Friday of month, come and join us here for a session of shed therapy! :D
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
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Re: hello

Postby TonyH » Thu Nov 14, 2013 11:43 am

Hello Sue and welcome. I'm suffering mild lifestyle envy, I love rural Greece.

Your walnut tree - forgive me if this is obvious already, but walnut has quite a lot of rather bland, light sapwood around that prized heartwood, so if it is just the dark heartwood you are after 6" may be not excessive a starting point for spoons ? Where you are, you could probably find a source of olive wood too ?
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Re: hello

Postby safronsue » Fri Nov 15, 2013 6:08 am

gavin wrote: Folks have carved longer than they have read.
i like that.

thanks for the warm welcome. Your shed sounds cosy, and funnily enough we do have a date in Glasgow at the beginning of the summer :mrgreen:

I bought a Russian axe last weekend along with a wet stone but the axe is about as sharp as the stone. fire wood tool. I will look into ordering the knives you recommend and a book.

We've got olive trees Tony, is it a nice wood for a beginner? Greece is a lovely country and i love my life here despite the unrest, in fact more because of it
safronsue
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Location: Kozani, Greece

Re: hello

Postby gavin » Fri Nov 15, 2013 8:14 am

safronsue wrote:We've got olive trees Tony, is it a nice wood for a beginner? Greece is a lovely country and i love my life here despite the unrest, in fact more because of it

Make sure whatever you use is GREEN & FRESH-CUT. I'd get a soft wood if poss - do you have lime? I don't know about olive, but try several and compare. You just need some side branches to find out from various species.
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
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Re: hello

Postby TonyH » Fri Nov 15, 2013 3:22 pm

safronsue wrote:We've got olive trees Tony, is it a nice wood for a beginner?


I don't know if it is an easy wood to work, but it can be very lovely when you're finished ! I have seen some really nice bowls made from spalted pieces in Greece - I think I was on Samos, but I forget.
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