Birch

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Birch

Postby Baggy » Mon Jun 14, 2010 5:18 pm

Not far from my house there is a area of woodland, the warden say that I can take some birch as all the birch are coming out.

So being completely new to this, help please.
What size circumference wood would I need to make a spoon, my first, something like a salad spoon (open to suggestions.?

If someone wanted to come along and educate me about taking wood they are more than welcome to have a share of the wood?


I am in Danbury, nr Chelmsford, in Essex.
Mark
Best wishes
Mark
----------------------------
I can spell but I cannot type.

Photos of the Chelmer and Blackwater canal
http://markbaigent.zenfolio.com/chelmer_blackwater
Baggy
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Re: Birch

Postby Ian S » Mon Jun 14, 2010 6:45 pm

Hi Baggy

Lucky you - birch is nice to work when fresh and green.

Clean, straight branches of between 2 1/2 and 3 inches diameter will work quite well for eating spoons, and maybe up to 4 inches diameter for serving spoons (split in half, one spoon per half). You can go up to larger sections if you can easily split the wood down to about these sizes.

One word of warning about birch - it's lovely stuff to carve when it's fresh and green. You can keep the unused wood in a plastic bag to keep it green, and it will probably keep for one month, maybe two. After three months (maybe earlier), it will probably start to rot. Once it statrs to rot, it rots fast.

Cheers
How sharp is sharp enough?
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Re: Birch

Postby Baggy » Tue Jun 15, 2010 9:42 am

Hi Ian

Ian S wrote:Lucky you - birch is nice to work when fresh and green.

I hope so, the last piece of wood I worked on (with hand tools) was seasoned ash!!!

Ian S wrote:Clean, straight branches of between 2 1/2 and 3 inches diameter will work quite well for eating spoons, and maybe up to 4 inches diameter for serving spoons (split in half, one spoon per half). You can go up to larger sections if you can easily split the wood down to about these sizes.

Tanks for that, just what I needed

Ian S wrote:One word of warning about birch - it's lovely stuff to carve when it's fresh and green. You can keep the unused wood in a plastic bag to keep it green, and it will probably keep for one month, maybe two. After three months (maybe earlier), it will probably start to rot. Once it statrs to rot, it rots fast.


Ah....... all the more reason to find someone who wants to share I think.


thanks
Mark
Best wishes
Mark
----------------------------
I can spell but I cannot type.

Photos of the Chelmer and Blackwater canal
http://markbaigent.zenfolio.com/chelmer_blackwater
Baggy
Regular
 
Posts: 306
Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 11:03 pm
Location: Danbury, Essex.


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