Norway Maple

If you know or have a source of materials or are looking for them post here.

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

Norway Maple

Postby Robin Fawcett » Tue Aug 19, 2008 5:31 am

Anyone else had experience of working this wood. (Acer platanoides).

A guy who came on a course with me who manages building sites got me a load. It looks, tastes, feels and smells like Sycamore but my god it's difficult to work. It's soft and turns a bit like marshmallow - fluffy !
http://www.facebook.com/GreenWoodwork?ref=tn_tnmn[url=http://www.treewright.co.uk/]
Green woodwork courses, treen, demonstrations & talks http://www.treewright.co.uk[/url]
User avatar
Robin Fawcett
Site Admin
 
Posts: 974
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2005 8:47 pm
Location: Essex/Herts/London

Postby Mark Allery » Tue Aug 19, 2008 11:10 am

Hi Robin,

not turned norway maple (to my knowledge anyway) but just been given some field maple (acer campestre - for those with a latin fixation) which seems very similar to sycamore, and perhaps a little softer. Maybe it will be easier to work when a little drier - if drier is at all possible in the current clime ?

cheers

Mark
Polelathe Turner, Woodsman & Green Woodworker. Demonstrations and Coppice Products
http://woodlandantics.wordpress.com
woodland.antics@virgin.net
User avatar
Mark Allery
Regular
 
Posts: 314
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 5:50 pm
Location: Lynchmere, Western Weald

Re: Norway Maple

Postby robin wood » Sat Aug 23, 2008 8:06 pm

Robin Fawcett wrote:Anyone else had experience of working this wood. (Acer platanoides).

A guy who came on a course with me who manages building sites got me a load. It looks, tastes, feels and smells like Sycamore but my god it's difficult to work. It's soft and turns a bit like marshmallow - fluffy !


Well I am surprised, I have only used it a few times for bowls and spoons so carving and turning and my limited experience was that it was significantly harder and denser than sycamore. It was one of the more common turnery woods in medieval times in Novgorod Russia.
http://www.robin-wood.co.uk bowls, books and courses
User avatar
robin wood
Regular
 
Posts: 1670
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2006 10:21 am
Location: derbyshire

Postby HughSpencer » Sat Aug 23, 2008 8:56 pm

Not sure but I seem to recall Field Maple was used to turn drum sticks, if wood turns fluffy maybe let it dry a little more - can't get any worse can it?
User avatar
HughSpencer
Site Admin
 
Posts: 430
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2005 12:05 am
Location: Peterborough

Postby Nicola Wood » Sun Aug 24, 2008 10:04 am

That's certainly my way with spoon carving. If I'm getting a fluffy finish off the tool I whittle them most of the way then give them a day or so to dry before I do the final finishing and then usually get a really smooth cut. I guess you can't do that so easily when you're turning 'cos it'll oval in the mean time :?
User avatar
Nicola Wood
Regular
 
Posts: 574
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 10:05 pm
Location: Peak District

Re: Norway Maple

Postby Follansbee » Tue Aug 26, 2008 2:18 am

Robin Fawcett wrote:Anyone else had experience of working this wood. (Acer platanoides).
It's soft and turns a bit like marshmallow - fluffy !


Robin

I am surprised to hear you call it soft as well...I wonder if it's the particular individual tree, maybe growing conditions affect it one way or another. I never go out & buy one, ( it shows up in firewood loads) but I have used it a lot for turned work, and find it quite hard. Its specific gravity puts it on a par with sugar maple over here, (acer saccharum) and not too far off from our red oak...

I find that a straight-grained Norway maple splits pretty well, for a maple. I use it for applied turnings on joined work. Like others have mentioned, I rough it out green, and let it dry some before the final surface finishing...

doesn't store well in the log, decay & infestation set in quickly...but I find that true of all the maples (acer) that I have used over here...

on this cabinet the feet, applied turnings, moldings & triangular "sunbursts" are all made from Norway maple, as is the initial plaque.

Image
Follansbee
Regular
 
Posts: 156
Joined: Sat May 03, 2008 7:26 pm
Location: Kingston, Massachusetts USA


Return to Sourcing Materials

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron