First Aid - Celox?

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First Aid - Celox?

Postby ToneWood » Sun Jul 01, 2012 7:24 pm

I've been thinking of investing in some Celox for my first aid kit. It's not cheap, about £15 a time off ebay and it has a fixed shelf life (about 3 years, if you buy carefully I think). But - if you believe the ads & youtube videos - it could save a life. It's the stuff the army pour (as granules) or pack (as coated gauze) into serious wounds on the battle field. I first started thinking of getting some at the time I bought my chainsaw...

http://www.celoxmedical.com/
http://www.gustharts.com/mp-1700115-cel ... d-stopper/
Image

I wonder if any forum members are familiar with this (e.g. used or trained to use this) and what they think of it? I believe there are competing products as well.
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Re: First Aid - Celox?

Postby Bob_Fleet » Sun Jul 01, 2012 10:29 pm

Like a previous thread the best thing is prevention not a bandaid.

I didn't handle a chainsaw until I did a course and over half of that covered safety.
It doesn't cut you but removes a great bit of you with right angled chisels flailing around on a chain.
To put it in perspective, you should have a first aid kit with you containing a large triangular bandage - to hold you together while you get to the hospital.
Also your risk assessment should include access for the ambulance or a helicopter.
I'd rather see people advising others not to use a chain saw.

However, together with the large triangular bandage Celox might help hold you together on the way to hospital.
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Re: First Aid - Celox?

Postby Paul Thornton 2sheds » Mon Jul 02, 2012 7:02 am

The most important safety feature is never mentioned in the list of safety features or ppe in the NPTC Schedules............a switched on brain.
1st aid provisions should be considered the absolutely last resort (before evacuation to hospital that is) unless in an extremely remote location I would save my money and not spend it on something that should never be used (hopefully).
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Re: First Aid - Celox?

Postby Davie Crockett » Mon Jul 02, 2012 10:11 am

As per the other replies, prevention is much better than cure. I've seen 2 chainsaw and one angle grinder accidents in 29 years as an ambulance practitioner, all were thigh injuries and all could have been prevented by proper use of the tool and safety gear.

That said, staunch dressings are a very good product but you would have to ensure it was on your person and in a protective case (In my experience wrappers degrade rapidly if left in pockets). You then have the bulk vs mobilty problem. Things like that get in the way when you're trying to move freely at odd angles.

Invest in decent protective gear i.e. : http://www.stantonhope.com/lev4_2_2_0_Protective_&_Safety_Clothing.asp?gclid=CPzV597S-rACFQQhtAodcVgz-g

One other point, most staunch dressings use Chitin (crustacian shell) as the active ingredient. It has been treated to reduce allergic reactions but if you are susceptible to shellfish allergies, it is best avoided.
Last edited by Davie Crockett on Mon Jul 02, 2012 8:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: First Aid - Celox?

Postby ToneWood » Mon Jul 02, 2012 1:48 pm

Wow Davie, that's a great answer - thank you.

I know somebody who almost bled to death twice - once plugging in an angle grinder while working on a roof (yes, cut into his thigh) & another time in a serious car accident - so perhaps this plays on my mind more than most. The ambulance crews saved him both times, just. We live a long way from the nearest hospital/ambulance & much further still from the air ambulance (which is often unavailable or unable to fly), mobile phone coverage is unavailable or very poor (landlines work tho'), so it is well to be prepared. I guess I am doing a worst case scenario risk assessment. I gather an arterial wound to the thigh gives you very little time unless the bleeding is stopped/reduced immediately. Severed arteries elsewhere probably very bad news too.
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