Planes

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Re: Planes

Postby JonGibbs » Thu Sep 13, 2012 7:40 pm

You could try Peter at the Toolpost. He's a really helpful guy and he usually has a fair few pieces of box in stock, which I think are musical instrument seconds.

http://www.toolpost.co.uk/pages/Hardwoods/Timber_Specialities/timber_specialities.html#boxwood

HTH
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Re: Planes

Postby witt » Fri Sep 14, 2012 6:46 pm

Thanks guys, I should cut some box that I've in mind soon (if no one has done it before me). It will not take more than 15 years at least before I can make some planes out of it (or my son will burn it if unfortunatly I'm gone).
Just know I've plenty of holm oak which is a wonderful continental wood at hand for making planes.
Take a look at billman's selection of crafts videos on his site, The two brothers which are wooden tools makers in Geneva will introduce you to the merits of this wood ("chêne vert", not to be understood as green oak). I made a large plane with some of it already.
Once again : thank you for collecting those great videos, Billman !
I may contact the two supplyers you've indicated because I could need another plane in box before I get too old waiting for my box bits to season (stored in water for a year, before having it stored in the dark for the rest of the seasoning process)
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Re: Planes

Postby jrccaim » Sat Sep 29, 2012 4:53 am

witt wrote:Thanks guys, I should cut some box that I've in mind soon (if no one has done it before me). It will not take more than 15 years at least before I can make some planes out of it (or my son will burn it if unfortunatly I'm gone).
Just know I've plenty of holm oak which is a wonderful continental wood at hand for making planes.
Take a look at billman's selection of crafts videos on his site, The two brothers which are wooden tools makers in Geneva will introduce you to the merits of this wood ("chêne vert", not to be understood as green oak). I made a large plane with some of it already.
Once again : thank you for collecting those great videos, Billman !
I may contact the two supplyers you've indicated because I could need another plane in box before I get too old waiting for my box bits to season (stored in water for a year, before having it stored in the dark for the rest of the seasoning process)


Ah, Witt, wir sind einig. But I must add something. You can make a plane out of almost any hard wood. I am currently making molding planes (because I want to make picture frames). I am making them out of an unknown table-top, which turns out to be oak. It was once my daughter's dining table. Box and beech are traditional; but not necessary. Now I admire beech and box. My chances of finding them here are 0.0000. So I use what I can find.

I have the utmost respect for anyone who makes planes in traditional style. I myself have deviated. I am more interested on using the planes. So I have made quite a number of planes in the Krenov style. If you google on "Krenov style plane" you will get many many hits. James Krenov was a great cabinetmaker. He did not claim to invent his style of plane, but he wrote about it it in his books. So many of my planes are Krenov-style. My current project is a skated plane, a plow-plane in fact, And curiously it is not Krenov-style. I need a plow plane to make a molding to make a picture frame, you see.
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Re: Planes

Postby witt » Sat Sep 29, 2012 8:13 am

"All men dream, but not equally..."
A plane which is carved with an axe makes me dream...
A piece of holm oak makes me dream...
A plane-iron which is hand-forged makes me dream...
A combination of the 3 elements has a strong suggestiv power on my day dreaming...
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Re: Planes

Postby jrccaim » Sun Sep 30, 2012 4:00 am

Know what you mean. Good luck. Make many planes.
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Re: Planes

Postby anobium » Mon Oct 01, 2012 9:11 pm

Re: gaiac, this is better known in the UK as Lignum Vitae, not used for planes AFAIK, but more for carvers mallets and pulley wheels. Members in France may know the cormier tree ( Sorbus domesticus) known in UK as the Service tree. This is an exceptionally hard wood and I was recently told that a chainsaw with tungsten carbide chain has to be used when felling. I have a plane made of this wood, bought in France but I have not heard of a plane made of this wood in the UK.
Regarding Roman planes, the best known is probably the Silchester plane which has a stock of iron and was found in 1890. The blade is also of iron and set at a high angle.
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Re: Planes

Postby witt » Wed Oct 03, 2012 9:00 pm

Most wooden planes produced by Peugeot or by Goldenberg or by "Aux mines de Suède" were made from sorbus domesticus. They were , and still are common amongst second hand tools.
Holm oak planes and boxwood ones were rarer and more hand made.
Gaiac, In my short career as a tool dealer; I've only come across one which I bought.
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Re: Planes

Postby jrccaim » Fri Oct 05, 2012 4:02 am

In fact you can make a plane out of any hardwood. Beech is traditional, in Europe. But in asiatic countries rosewood is the wood of choice, and the Japanese use oak (their variety). I have a couple of rosewood planes from Taiwan and very nice they are, too. However, it depends on how traditional you are. The reason our ancestors used beech and rosewood is because (a) they were at hand (b) because they are not too hard to work with hand tools and (c) they are hard. Repeated planing of softer woods will not wear them down. I am currently using oak from my daughter's ex-tabletop. For instance
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DSCN1096n.JPG (121.9 KiB) Viewed 9958 times

This is a plow plane used since about the 14th century in Florence and no doubt other places to cut grooves. It is made completely from scratch. Out of an old oak tabletop. Cutter from an old circular saw blade, and shape non-traditional. Absolutely. So sue me :) You will understand, I am sure, that I am a long way away from a source of beech. Or rosewood. Or even mahogany. Something like 15,000 Km at a conservative estimate. My only consolation is that I ran across an English planemaker's blog. I'd give you the link, but it is broken as is so usual on the Internet. He complained about the difficulty of finding beech in Britain :(. So I have my tabletop and that will make quite a few planes. I have some construction details on my blog, http://www.chalupyacres.blogspot.com, search for label "shaped planes."
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Plane collection - for sale

Postby ToneWood » Tue Oct 30, 2012 3:09 pm

A local chap showed me his rather impressive, large collection of planes at the weekend. He is looking to get rid of them, or some of them. They are mainly metal English planes in various size plus some of those slim wooden "dado" type planes, like jrccaim's above, and a few specialist routing type planes. I don't much know about planes - would it be worth me making an offer on any of them? I already have Pa's #4 Marples plane & a small palm plane - they seem like enough for my current needs. Is there another plane that you would particularly recommend getting? I saw a picture in one of my books of Wille Sundqvist using a very long old wooden plane to flatten the bottom of a bowl. This chap has some very long metal planes - apparently two them (not the longest) are "jack planes".

Also, if anybody else needs a plane, I could probably put you in contact.
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Re: Planes

Postby Salmoncreek » Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:41 pm

It was mentioned earlier, about inexpensive planes versus expensive ones. I have several antique planes, Stanley mostly. I also have a 1980's Stanley #4 plane. The 80's plane works fine......... after much tuning and finishing of the mating surfaces. But, I got it cheap, so I didn't mind putting the work into it. The only complaint I have with it, is the blade iron will not take an edge like the antique ones. Really isn't a huge deal to me, but as soon as I get an extra blade iron, an older one, I will replace it.

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Re: Planes

Postby witt » Tue Jan 29, 2013 9:32 pm

I don't know if it's still possible but one could order laminated steel cutters from Stanley.
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Re: Planes

Postby ToneWood » Wed Jan 30, 2013 2:43 pm

jrccaim wrote:... He complained about the difficulty of finding beech in Britain :(
Really? They are pretty common round here.
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Re: Planes

Postby Salmoncreek » Fri Feb 01, 2013 12:11 am

I'll check and see what Stanley still offers for blade irons. What I've seen are really cheap ones on the internet, and then real expensive! My work doesn't require the expensive ones, and the cheap ones I can't get a worthwhile edge on them. So, stuck in la la land I guess.....

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Re: Planes

Postby chipsrod » Sat Feb 09, 2013 11:53 am

i was very much interestd in making insterments but darn it i am tone def .so that was out of the question.now as for tools you do not have to go the way of every one ells in order to do what you want. i was out running garage sales at this one place this old guy with one leg i found out was making violins and bows.he had the moulds and all that stuff that he made him self but no planes he used hooked knives. he had made. any way i showed him the basic way of making planes.i got back to his place two weekes latter and he showed me the how well his new planes he had made.he had carved them out by hand but dam did they work. i have made a lot of planes but never tryed to carve them out
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Re: Planes

Postby jrccaim » Wed Feb 20, 2013 5:46 am

Salmoncreek wrote:I'll check and see what Stanley still offers for blade irons. What I've seen are really cheap ones on the internet, and then real expensive! My work doesn't require the expensive ones, and the cheap ones I can't get a worthwhile edge on them. So, stuck in la la land I guess.....
Mike


Lee Valley offers replacement blades for some Stanley planes. The all-time standard Stanley substitute is the Hock repacement blade, also offered by Lee Valley last time I looked. They are superb. A #4 is a very standard plane blade, so you should be able to find a Hock in that size. I would not advise looking at Stanley. Asiatic stuff these days and very prone to manufacturing defects. Lee-Nielsen in Maine, USA makes a replica of the Stanley #4 only far better, and they sell the blade to boot. But you will pay through the nose for it. And you will feel very unwell over Lee-Nielsen prices. But they are quality stuff. Best commercial plane anywhere in my own opinion. I own one of them and it is unbelievable. The blade is "cryogenically" treated. They supercool it with liquid Nitrogen and I thought at first that this was marketroid B.S. but no. The edge holds up forever before I have to sharpen it. The things are far too expensive for me to own more than one, so I don't have any statistics.

As they say, you pays your money and you takes your choice.
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