Pole or Bungee

discussion of the niceties of turning on a bow, bungee or pole lathe.

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Pole or Bungee

Postby Bob_Fleet » Tue Aug 15, 2006 10:57 pm

How can you have a pole lathe powered by a bungee?

The only real accident I've had was using a bungee when the knot pulled through the top of the support and really bruised the operators wrist. Something like a game of human conkers. The first-aiders at the event were delighted to have a victim and had an excuse to get ice and write it in the book and everything. Wow!

Here's wonderful site showing just how dangerous bungees can be.
I don't know what the rest of the lathe looks like though.

Enjoy!

http://www.quacked.com/reverse-bungee-jumping.html

:(
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Postby eddy the artful bodger » Sun Oct 05, 2008 5:02 pm

hi I use a twin pole constuction that uses the flex of the pole and a pulley system similar to the compound bow. the best thing is it does not have a bungy anywhere. :wink: I just could not get on with a bungy. Eddy
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Postby Bob_Fleet » Sun Oct 05, 2008 6:01 pm

Sounds good.
Is it like the ones shown in the thread with the American workshops?
Any chance of a picture?
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Postby Heinrich H » Sun Oct 05, 2008 7:41 pm

The last letter in the swedish alfabet just cut off the text like UK pound-sign
Last edited by Heinrich H on Sun Oct 05, 2008 7:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Heinrich H » Sun Oct 05, 2008 7:41 pm

http://biphome.spray.se/torbjorn_sundstrom/

Torbjorn have one with twin poles on his homepage.

I copied this idea and found it very useful a demos indoors, where space was limited.
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swash work

Postby Follansbee » Mon Oct 06, 2008 2:06 am

Heinrich H wrote:http://biphome.spray.se/torbjorn_sundstrom/

Torbjorn have one with twin poles on his homepage.

I copied this idea and found it very useful a demos indoors, where space was limited.


Heinrich (or anyone else who might know)

I browsed this website and noticed a vessel turned with some skewed or angled decoration. http://biphome.spray.se/torbjorn_sundstrom/

Joseph Moxon in the 1680s called this swash work in English. I saw a staircase in a house in Wales that had several flights of balusters like this. On the balusters all the turned ornament was angled. Done in that case in oak in the seventeenth century.

the lathe is a complicated affair, here illustrated in Jacques Besson s Theatrum Instrumentorum 1578.

Image

and here is a shot of the staircase.

Image

It would be fun to learn more about this type of turning. I had never seen it until the Welsh visit.

Besson engravings are at this website

http://www.sil.si.edu/DigitalCollection ... besson.htm
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Postby riptoff » Mon Oct 06, 2008 6:16 pm

there are illustrations of lathes with swash plates in Diderot and Alembert's 'Art du Tourneur'.
Concerning poles, I was thinking that a fishing rod might be usable. Modern rods seem to be telescopic, rather than the type I remember with sections and brass ferrules.
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Swash work

Postby Robin Fawcett » Mon Oct 06, 2008 6:46 pm

That's fascinating Peter. I've spent ages looking at those engravings trying to understand how they work.

I think part of the problem is that the artist didn't really understand what was going on - but he was good at rendering figures ! I like that hat.
The turners line of sight of what he's doing is through 2 narrow slots ? the treadle looks all out of proportion. .

I've never actually seen anything turned in this method. The staircase is interesting but makes me feel kind of queasy looking at it - no wonder it never caught on !
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Postby eddy the artful bodger » Tue Oct 07, 2008 5:37 pm

unfortunatly I have not got a picture that I can put on the net, to describe it, may be awkward but here goes. you have the two poles much the same as a bundgy, but instead of a piece of elastic I used a length of pull start cord the has to be 3x the distance between the poles. next you tie one end of the cord to one pole (at the very top). thread throught a pulley 3" from the top of the second pole, back throught a pulley attached 3"below the original knot. then tied of at the top of the second pole. the work cord (or whatever you want call it ) attaches by a clip/ring with a full twist so that it stay where placed but can be adjusted easily. I will try and do a drawing or get a photo from some where. Eddy
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Postby HughSpencer » Tue Oct 07, 2008 8:26 pm

On the matter of the swashplate lathe rest. I suspect that there is a certain amount of misinformation in the illustration, bear in mind the guilds discouraged disclosure of techniques to the uninitiated. I can see how one might use such a swashplate but the difficult bit would be setting the swashplate runner on the tool and keeping it from jumping off. The illustration glosses over this and the treadle is improbable, as is the location of the turner since his view of the work is pretty much obscured.

On the matter of how to achieve a spring without a long pole - always a difficult one, I commend the Bodgers Muddle I designed all those years ago. I have just removed the broken cord from mine, it lasted only 8 years. That's the trouble with modern stuff, it doesn't last :-) I wonder if Mike still has some of that kevlar cord left.
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Muddle

Postby Darrell » Wed Oct 08, 2008 12:43 am

HughSpencer wrote:On the matter of how to achieve a spring without a long pole - always a difficult one, I commend the Bodgers Muddle I designed all those years ago.


I can vouch for the Muddle too. Mine is *ahem* somewhat rustic, but it has stood in on numerous occasions when a pole was impractical, like indoor demonstrations. They seem to frown on anyone who wants to hammer a big stake into the floor...

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Re: Pole or Bungee

Postby eddy the artful bodger » Mon May 11, 2009 10:08 pm

i've done it i have managed to get a picture of the pulley system i use instead of a bungy which i never got on with. now fingers crossed there will be some pictures oooops no pictures and i thought it was easyImage
the idea is similar to the compound bow configuration, or as i say stolen from the dukes of hazzard. and its cord not bungy.
Image
Image
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Re: Pole or Bungee

Postby Donald Todd » Thu Aug 27, 2009 8:47 pm

I tend to use a bungee with light, but relatively rigid poles when I'm demonstrating, but I will leap at the chance of a real pole. The problem with the bungee is that it gets very taught at the bottom of the stroke: bad enough for me but very much worse for the children "having a go". It helps them if you can make the treadle as light as possible.
If you use a heavier bungee, much longer than the lathe bed, you get a much nicer action: this is how I work in my greenhouse ,with the 8 foot long, 5 mm diameter bungee strung along the roof ridge.
At one time I tried using a bungee lengthwise with the cord running through a pulley in the ceiling, but it was noisy, dirty and the pulley wore out.
The problem with a pole is the space it takes which really has to be cordoned off.
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Re: Pole or Bungee

Postby simon » Fri Aug 28, 2009 10:44 am

When out demonstrating I use a Bodger's Muddle (thank you Hugh) which gets a lot of coments. The set up in the garage..does anyone keep a car in one....is a bungee length wise running over a small bicycle wheel. The wheel also moves along the bed. It is quiet and simple, if I treadle very enthusiastically the bungee can slap on the cieling but thats all.
Make it, mend it, wear it out,
Make it do or do without.
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Re: Pole or Bungee

Postby gavin » Fri Aug 28, 2009 2:22 pm

simon wrote: The set up in the garage...is a bungee length wise running over a small bicycle wheel. The wheel also moves along the bed.

Ooh don't tantalise me like that! :wink:
Go on, give us some pictures of a set-up that sounds most interesting...
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