Drill through a piece of wood lengthwise

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Re: Drill through a piece of wood lengthwise

Postby jrccaim » Wed Jun 26, 2013 5:21 am

emjay wrote:East Midlands, probably Nottingham or South Derbyshire


Thanks to all who have enlightened my untutored ears:) I caught "moosket" for musket, of course; but the rest was beyond me!

Anyway I watched the whole series. On the whole this is quite amazing. It would be absolutely impossible on a pole lathe. A pole lathe turns between centers and he is boring out one end of a cylinder. The fact he uses an ordinary spindle gouge (or ladyfinger gouge as I learned to call it) leaves me in awe. I would still use a steady rest :). For us ordinary mortals this makes boring out much easier; but Mr Webb is so good he compensates without your noticing. The end of his workpiece is "running out" (i.e. is eccentric) a whole mm or more but he catches center with the gouge and scoffs at a steady (although I am sure he knows they exist!) Maybe steadies were not used much in the 17th century. If so Mr Webb shows you what you can do without a steady-rest. Maybe in the 17th century they were not widespread, have to do some research on that. BTW the piece is held in a screw center as I suspected. A real long screw center, which minimizes runout. But it still runs out, and that is where skill comes in.
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Re: Drill through a piece of wood lengthwise

Postby Master Webbe » Thu Jul 18, 2013 5:59 pm

ToneWood wrote:
jrccaim wrote:... (BTW the accent is strange to me. Is that Yorkshire? Enlightenment appreciated :) ) ...
Sounds like a v. mild northern accent to my southern ears - almost non-regional. Very mild though, only a few words caught my attention e.g. "much", "just", "touch", "comes", "shove" - which he first pronounced with a long-u (northern/midlands) then a short-u ( southern). Probably Leeds (which I count as Yorkshire) as that is where the armory is or perhaps it is a more southern accent modified by living in/around Leeds or vice versa (an educated man I expect). Pure regional accents have become less common in the UK as people move around and mix more these days, far more people go onto higher education (more than 50%?) or work away from home these days.


We have a Sherlock Holmes. My accent is the same as all my friends from home bar one. The one exception did not go to University! A couple of months ago I raised the issue why our accents are so different to the local ones (Stockport Cheshire: No points scored there then but north/midlands is pretty darn good) and we agreed we had the accents before going to Uni. Peter Wood's wife taught me in primary school and remembers me. Perhaps i should ask how I spoke then. I'm 52 and have lived on the Derbyshire/Sheffield border for twenty years - the local accent still confuses me sometimes! Asking 'Where's the bin?' is often met with 'Skeg-Vagus. Weerz dar bin?'

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Re: Drill through a piece of wood lengthwise

Postby Master Webbe » Thu Jul 18, 2013 6:14 pm

jrccaim wrote:
emjay wrote:East Midlands, probably Nottingham or South Derbyshire


Thanks to all who have enlightened my untutored ears:) I caught "moosket" for musket, of course; but the rest was beyond me!

Anyway I watched the whole series. On the whole this is quite amazing. It would be absolutely impossible on a pole lathe. A pole lathe turns between centers and he is boring out one end of a cylinder. The fact he uses an ordinary spindle gouge (or ladyfinger gouge as I learned to call it) leaves me in awe. I would still use a steady rest :). For us ordinary mortals this makes boring out much easier; but Mr Webb is so good he compensates without your noticing. The end of his workpiece is "running out" (i.e. is eccentric) a whole mm or more but he catches center with the gouge and scoffs at a steady (although I am sure he knows they exist!) Maybe steadies were not used much in the 17th century. If so Mr Webb shows you what you can do without a steady-rest. Maybe in the 17th century they were not widespread, have to do some research on that. BTW the piece is held in a screw center as I suspected. A real long screw center, which minimizes runout. But it still runs out, and that is where skill comes in.


Thanks for all the kind comments. You will have seen the video of the Joseph Moxon drill bench. The steady on that has differing sized holes so it can be used as a variable steady. I have not used it as such but you are right that I should. I now use a pin mandrel in place of the worm screw. The pin mandrel enables me to push the work on the pin without screwing it on so that it is a quicker smoother process. You noticed the wobble and even my pin mandrel (1/2" diameter) has got a bit of a wobble on it now so I will have to try the steady.

My gimlet opens a small hole to make things easier but I'm interested in your boring bar idea. Do you have a picture of one or a site that sells them? Perhaps I could put a handle on one and use it like the spindle gouge. The reason I have avoided such things is the increased resistance on the wood. The main difference between the pole and the wheel is the torque. There is much more power behind the leg than a spinning wheel. Perhaps I should use my pole when boring with a boring bar.

This weekend I was at Skidbrook Church in Lincolnshire (St Botolph's) and you might be able to see how the Joseph Moxon lathe is constructed.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.218919584924354.1073741833.171424733007173&type=3

Kind regards,

Graham.
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Re: Drill through a piece of wood lengthwise

Postby ToneWood » Thu Jul 18, 2013 8:28 pm

Thanks for solving the mystery Graham :). I think you are right about Uni, several friends that went away to Uni maintained strong regional accents, some even after postgrad years, including two who had what I consider "northern accents" much stronger accent than yours, despite being from Rugby & Derbyshire - which many would probably consider Midlands. My own accent has changed considerably over time and continues to change, a hybrid of many influences.

BTW is Skeg-Vegas a combination of Skegness & Las Vegas or is that how they pronounce something else (Skegness perhaps)?
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