The venerable no. 80 cabinet scraper.

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The venerable no. 80 cabinet scraper.

Postby ToneWood » Thu May 30, 2013 9:42 am

My new "secret weapon" (for finishing bowls)- the Stanley* no. 80 cabinet scraper:

Image
Warning: you no longer get a full length blade as shown in the image above, with the Stanley version - just a stubby little vestige blade :(!



I only started using it yesterday - tried it out on my near finished Leylandii bowl (which in hindsight was probably not prudent but no harm done), so early days, but I rather like it: it is simple and effective :). Easier to use well than a handheld card scraper and significantly gentler than a spokeshave. Normally, these are held thumb-screw towards user and pushed but I tend to use it thumb-screw away from user and pulled - like a spokeshave - but I am still experimenting at this stage. Looks very promising though :)
Last edited by ToneWood on Wed Jul 03, 2013 1:17 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: The no. 80 cabinet scraper.

Postby ToneWood » Tue Jun 04, 2013 1:31 pm

Other brands of #80 cabinet scrapers are available, for example:
  • Faithfull Cabinet Scraper (No.80) 70mm (part number: FAI SCRAPER80),
  • Record #80 cabinet scraper,
  • Veritas #80 scraper and
  • Kunz #80 scraper

Apparently this type of scraper has been around for a long time and so are readily available secondhand.

A Vintage Record #80 scraper, in blue:
ImageImage

When I started looking, I found only a few very overpriced ones, so I bought a new one from Amazon, which had the best price & free shipping at the time. Then about 10 or 12 vintage ones to show up on ebay at more reasonable prices 2 days later - ce la vie!

The very similar but significantly cheaper Faithfull #80 cabinet scraper
Image
...and the thinner blade is reputed to work just fine*.

* http://paulsellers.com/2012/11/faithful ... rapers-ok/

Note the large knurled nut instead of thumb screw facing user. The current Stanley model has a thumb-screw facing the user & 2 slotted, knurled nuts on the other side. Some old ones have 3 thumb-screws.

The expensive but lovely Veritas #80 scraper (the Ferrari of #80 scrapers? :D) :
Image Image http://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums/veri ... t1976.html
http://www.veritastools.com/products/Page.aspx?p=143
Last edited by ToneWood on Wed Jul 03, 2013 1:19 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: The venerable no. 80 cabinet scraper.

Postby TonyH » Tue Jun 04, 2013 3:07 pm

When recomissioning an older #80 scraper, a thing to watch out for is that the blade clamping plate is flat. Overtightening of the adjusting screw can leave this bent, which has the effect that it has two settings - no cut, or juddering across the surface trying to take huge bites ! It is an easy matter to bend it back to straight, and made a big difference to my Record version.
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Re: The venerable no. 80 cabinet scraper.

Postby ToneWood » Wed Jul 03, 2013 1:14 pm

Good tip, thanks Tony. Yet another #80 cabinet scraper, this one by German company Kunz, in green:
ImageImage
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Re: The venerable no. 80 cabinet scraper.

Postby TonyH » Wed Jul 03, 2013 1:36 pm

The latest issue of Fine Woodworking (Issue No. 234 July/August 2013) has an article about using, and sharpening, this type of scraper.
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Re: The venerable no. 80 cabinet scraper.

Postby jrccaim » Sun Jul 07, 2013 5:59 am

Scrapers are very useful tools. I myself swear by a piece of old ripsaw blade that I "sharpened" according to Mike Abbot's directions (thanks Mike!). In order for a scraper to work properly you have to make a sort of hook-shape edge on them; you turn over a razor edge with a hard piece of steel. Mike calls this steel a ticketer. In the US it is called a burnisher. Whatever it is called it is extremly effective. I have the official Lee Valley burnisher, but Mike suggests you use a chisel -- anything reasonably hard. Mike also suggests you grind the edge of the scraper to 70 degrees. This is in complete contradiction to all the learned books, which suggest a 90 deg edge. All I can say is that Mike's directions worked perfectlly for me. I also have a set of Lee Valley scrapers. I have never gotten them to scrape worth, er, spit. I am sure I don't know what I am doing wrong. But with Mike's directions the shavings curl up beautifully, a pleasure to use. Furthermore the saw blade has a rounded top edge. I ground that to 70 deg and burnished (ticketed) it and I can get into very tight (inside) spots. And it is much easier to find a castoff saw blade than an old Stanley tool (beautiful though it may be). All you need is say 6 cm, of blade, enough to get a handhold. I may add that Lee-Nielsen in the USA makes copies of the old Stanley scraping tools, but at astounding prices even though the quality is superb.

Of course when you grind a scraper to 70 deg acute angle it becomes a one-way tool. It will not scrape along the bevel. Yes, this saw scraper is a one-way thing, but that is hardly important, since it takes one second to flip it around in your hand.

The spokeshave-like handled scrapers have their place. They are superb for flat surfaces, such as tabletops, and after you have scraped such a surface sandpaper is an insult to the wood. You can also find scraping plane-shaped objects (scraping planes). But for oddly shaped surfaces, such as spoons and bowls, I will stick to my old piece of saw blade. Come to think of it, maybe I will grind a concave curve in it; then I can use it on outside surfaces.

Just for fun, I measured up once the shavings I got from a plane. I had it adjusted so it would produce "reasonably fine shavings." I got somethng like 0.1mm. On the curls I get from the scraper I am doing something like .01mm or half a thou inch! In fact the shavings were very difficult to measure, they were so thin. You would be hard-pressed to get these shavings from any machine.
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Re: The venerable no. 80 cabinet scraper.

Postby Steve Martin » Sun Jul 07, 2013 6:57 pm

Here! Here! I concur with your comments. Will add that I often repurpose reciprocating saw blades for use as scrapers. I do sharpen to 90 degrees and then roll the edge with the shank of a screwdriver or a turning gouge edge. I don't seem to get as strong a rolled edge if I use a square shank/shaft. I don't usually grind off the teeth unless the blade is more than 1/2" wide. Some of the thinner reciprocating blades are so thin they don't give me the oomph I want when scraping flat areas but they work great around curves, especially inside curves. I also use them in lieu of sand paper as finishing cut on a continuous motion lathe. The thin shavings you described just fly off even at the slowest speed I use when using on a powered lathe.
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Re: The venerable no. 80 cabinet scraper.

Postby ToneWood » Sun Jul 07, 2013 8:06 pm

I use card scrapers too - the curved ones are handy for the inside of bowls once they are dry. I prefer the #80 scraper for the outside of large bowls, when a smooth surface is desired, and for the top surface. Probably not much use for small bowls/kuksas though. I would also prefer it for anything of significant size - one youtube video shows a guy finishing the deck and another the sides of his wooden boats with one.

BTW I've seen a couple of interesting little holders for regular card scrapers [Google: "card scraper holder"]. One is a fancy metal affair by Veritas, the other was wooden - I think they cost around £9-£14-ish, about the same as a used #80 cabinet scraper, although without a blade. But you could potentially make one of these. They seem to work much like the #80 cabinet scraper: a thumb-screw in the middle is tightened to flex and hold the bent scraper. I don't think they had handles though - I guess the idea it simply to hold the blade which the optimal bend in it.
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http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.a ... 10&p=32669

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http://www.dilegnosupply.com/Scrapers/c ... holder.htm

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http://lumberjocks.com/Julian/blog/8038

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http://lumberjocks.com/projects/41367

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Simple one: http://lignified.com/?p=149
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Re: The venerable no. 80 cabinet scraper.

Postby AlexanderTheLate » Sun Jul 07, 2013 9:58 pm

I have found an old, dull pocket knife burnished into a scraper to be very usefull, and for larger areas, a paint scraper can be modified to a scraper and is very effective. :)
I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction. The world will have a generation of idiots.- Unknown.
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Re: The venerable no. 80 cabinet scraper.

Postby ToneWood » Tue Jul 09, 2013 1:13 pm

I like the paint-scraper idea. I have a couple of wide, old, wooden-handled paint scrapers (one was Pa's, the other I bought in the USA) which would likely be suitable but we still need them for scraping paint! :) I guess using them as a wood-scraper just requires the edge to be flattened &, perhaps, a burr formed and angled - which shouldn't preclude them from being used for scraping paint later.

RE. pocket knives, I see somebody on one of the carving forums has come up with a modification for Swiss-army knives with a can opener - he filed his into a small hook-skew tool :).
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Re: The venerable no. 80 cabinet scraper.

Postby gavin » Tue Jul 09, 2013 3:49 pm

ToneWood wrote:... pocket knives, I see somebody on one of the carving forums has come up with a modification for Swiss-army knives with a can opener - he filed his into a small hook-skew tool :).

Link please!
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