Shed Therapy stool whittling videos

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Shed Therapy stool whittling videos

Postby gavin » Mon Sep 30, 2013 10:14 pm

I have long held an idea of getting public to make have-a-go stools on the showfield in under 60 minutes. I am not there yet, but have begun to practise the process a good deal.

Here are 2 videos shot at last Shed Therapy session. Whilst they have been edited somewhat, I still feel they could be briefer. We don't assemble the stool in this session - that's next month's instalment.

http://youtu.be/vIn5wZmYZO8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pp0hOUEr ... 2RO2cNRb8w

Anyway, if you did feel like watching some - or all - of these and telling me where you think I could improve or alter my method and procedures, or my instruction methods, or my of handling people, I'd be very interested to read your thoughts. I don't want your praise, I want your negatives! So be picky!



And for those who like making frame furniture, this may offer a few ideas you could use.
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Re: Shed Therapy stool whittling videos

Postby Darrell » Wed Oct 02, 2013 12:46 am

Hi Gavin

Looking for negatives, eh? Well, all I have are comments and/or ideas. That will have to do.

When I try to show people how to use a froe effectively, I always try to explain that you want equal masses of wood on either side of the cut. I expect that your measuring process works (although I have not done the math) but I find it a bit too pedantic for green woodworking. That said, since I have tried to show people how to use a froe, I understand the problem you are solving with this method. It makes the process simple and direct - there is no guesswork. I do like the rings you are using for sizing the stock, too.

When I was taught to use a drawknife in a local chair making class I already had some experience with the tool, but the one fundamental thing I learned was: to make something round, first make it square. Take your split billet and shave it square. Then knock off the corners to make it octagonal. One more set of corners and it's a, um, sixteen-a-gon (too lazy to ask google). At this point it's so round that a minute with a spokeshave will make it a nearly perfect cylinder. Or a minute with a light touch on the drawknife.

You could edit the videos down a bit too, although they fit nicely into my lunch hour at work. I look forward to seeing more.

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Re: Shed Therapy stool whittling videos

Postby gavin » Wed Oct 02, 2013 7:14 am

Darrell wrote: When I try to show people how to use a froe effectively, I always try to explain that you want equal masses of wood on either side of the cut. I expect that your measuring process works (although I have not done the math) but I find it a bit too pedantic for green woodworking.

Have you got Mike Abbott’s Going with the Grain? pp25-6 describes this more elegantly than me, and just possibly may interest you. If you have not got it, I’d heartily recommend it.

Darrell wrote: I do like the rings you are using for sizing the stock, too.

Again I thank Mike Abbott. It’s a good idea to look out for building sites or other places for pipes (metal or plastic) you can cut into rings.

Darrell wrote: the one fundamental thing I learned was: to make something round, first make it square. Take your split billet and shave it square. Then knock off the corners to make it octagonal. One more set of corners and it's a, um, sixteen-a-gon (too lazy to ask google). At this point it's so round that a minute with a spokeshave will make it a nearly perfect cylinder. Or a minute with a light touch on the drawknife.

Thanks for this. I have encouraged hundreds of folk to use a drawknife at have-a-go sessions at shows, and I have never used or tried this technique. I will now.
The first project I have had any one do is a vampire stake – whatever a beginner does will end up with a slope and a point, so you may as well give the product a name and a purpose. I’ll ask “ Just how much of a problem are vampires where you live?” whilst nodding my head in the affirmative – they soon get the message. We then sometimes have fun testing out the stake on a sometimes increasingly unwilling volunteer...
1-IMG_0966.jpg
testing a vampire stake at a Shed Therapy session
1-IMG_0966.jpg (70.12 KiB) Viewed 5090 times


Darrell wrote: You could edit the videos down a bit too, although they fit nicely into my lunch hour at work.

I take your point. Not every viewer has an hour and the close interest you have shown. The videographer was a local enthusiast who asked if he could shoot us and has a nice camera. I have already asked him to produce a cut-down version of 2 minutes. But do book your lunch hour’s viewing about 29 or 30 Oct when the stool assembly video will be published – and quite likely the seat weaving! Unless of course you’d like to come to next Shed Therapy session....? Last Friday of the month from 7 pm, admission by donation…
Gavin Phillips


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Re: Shed Therapy stool whittling videos

Postby deadsquirrel » Sun Nov 08, 2015 8:41 am

A couple of useful videos Gavin. The ratio needed for splitting in a straight line may save me wasting so much wood. I thought there might be an easier way to get the correct point marked on the end, so I started with a piece of graph paper. This was still more work than necessary, and a piece of paper is not so useful for outside workshops (or shows) . Next was a parallelogram with a cross bar positioned at the right ratio, still too complex, then I thought of proportional dividers. This needed two operations to measure and then mark. Since there is not much new under the sun, youtube was the next stop where I found https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nBa6lpRqfE8. The style is questionable, but the results are promising and easy to realise a quick cardboard marking gadget. Looking a bit further I found a wooden offering https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=s37RP3mVnTg. This fulfills the requirements of being a single operation and robust, so I'll make one today (or maybe a batch to sell at shows). Various sizes could be made to suit splitting, or marking up position of components on chairs and tables.

I think showing this ratio in merely splitting wood illustrates just how canny people were in the past in that they probably knew about this, and used it. Just something else that as been lost to the general population, now resurected, thanks Mike.

Some further reading https://www.mathsisfun.com/numbers/natu ... nacci.html could be useful for background material for shows. An explananatory video http://goldenmeangauge.co.uk/references/ They also sell a gauge which is good value if accurate. If you make one at home a lot of care is needed to get accuracy, it is easy to be a few % out.
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