My pole lathe so far.

discussion of the niceties of turning on a bow, bungee or pole lathe.

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

My pole lathe so far.

Postby robgorrell » Fri Oct 07, 2011 4:09 pm

I finally got around to trying to use my pole lathe the other day. Emmediately clear was that I needed to lengthen my bungie. I was bottoming out on length before the bottom of a comfortable treadle. So I lengthened the overhead bungie and fixed that problem. Then there was the problem of the treadle moving around too much on the floor. I was using a piece of leather on the end of the treadle to stand on and hold it in place, but it is too small to stand on. I tried screwing it to a piece of plywood to stand on and that worked OK until the leather wollared a hole around the screw and came off. I also stuch some sanding pads on the treadle to keep my foot from sliding. At this point I think I want to switch to the A-frame treadle that I see so many of online. I think it would make switching legs much easier.

Also, what the heck is that muscle at the hip joint that gets sore so fast????

Anyway, here are some shots of my lathe at this point. It looks like my images are too big to get all in. Is there a size limit?

Image

Image
Image
robgorrell
Regular
 
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Jul 08, 2011 4:50 pm
Location: West Virginia, USA

Re: My pole lathe so far.

Postby gavin » Sun Oct 09, 2011 10:50 am

Your lathe is anchored to the floor, close to the wall. This means your treadle arm length cannot be varied - your treadle arm end will hit the wall. I suggest you bolt yours to some heavy beams that you can then move to positions that suit you. Moving the lathe will mean you must move your spring. I suggest you fix vertical poles or timbers either side of the lathe to overcome that problem.
Your lathe bed looks too low. Rule of thumb is to have the turning axis at the height of your nipples, or possibly 2 inches lower. My evidence for that is the experience of building many lathes and also pictures of old timers - I reckon they turn about nipple height.
Reference your treadle design: I now follow the diagrams p74 in Mike Abbott's book Living Wood - by doing that, I now offer a much better experience to anyone who comes along for shed therapy with me or my fellow therapists.
Your sore muscle will arise because your turning axis is too low and so you must stoop and I suspect your fact your leg arc is quite short because the treadle is short - you are using only a short portion of your leg muscle and not the full fibres available. Also you get better result if your treadle end can hit a hard surface and thus give reflected energy back. Just as a smith will bounce her hammer on the anvil between working blows to reflect energy and partially raise her hammer, you will gain reflected energy from your stroke if you have the treadle strike some firm 'energy reflector', positioned at an optimum angle.
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
User avatar
gavin
Regular
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 4:17 pm
Location: Dalbeattie, near Dumfries, Scotland

Re: My pole lathe so far.

Postby Paul Thornton 2sheds » Sun Oct 09, 2011 12:52 pm

It also appears you maybe turning square timber?
learning more every day
User avatar
Paul Thornton 2sheds
Regular
 
Posts: 330
Joined: Mon Jan 15, 2007 10:51 pm
Location: wildest gower, corner of south wales

Re: My pole lathe so far.

Postby gavin » Sun Oct 09, 2011 9:05 pm

Paul Thornton 2sheds wrote:It also appears you maybe turning square timber?

And mebbe very DRY square timber?
Get thee a shave horse and a draw knife!
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
User avatar
gavin
Regular
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 4:17 pm
Location: Dalbeattie, near Dumfries, Scotland

Re: My pole lathe so far.

Postby gavin » Sun Oct 09, 2011 9:16 pm

I would also take a leather tab approx 3 or 2 inches long and 20 mm wide. Punch a hole approx 5 mm from each end. Double the tab over your bungee. I fit a twisted 'S' hook to tabs so I can easily separate string from bungee - but if you are fixed in your shed and never going out to demo you may not bother with this. If you don't want the 'S' hook you can lead your string through the holes of the tab. The tab minimises chafe on your bungee and more importantly allows you to vary the string position along your work.

And if you are needing to cash in any heirlooms, put up the WW2 helmet on Ebay !( Observe top shelf - you may as well liberate the space for some useful object which you could probably buy with helmet proceeds.)
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
User avatar
gavin
Regular
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 4:17 pm
Location: Dalbeattie, near Dumfries, Scotland

Re: My pole lathe so far.

Postby robgorrell » Mon Oct 10, 2011 7:54 pm

Thanks for the great replies Paul and Gavin. I appreciate it. It is true that I have been having trouble with the treadle whacking the wall. I thougth bolting it down would help keep vibration down, but I can already see that the current spot is not ideal. I did a quick measurement this morning and it looks like if I bolt sections of 8" timbers to the feet if will bring the centers up to about where you say they need to be. I did not realize that a pole lathe needed higher centers than a electric powered lathe.

Oh, the square wood thing. I do have a shaving horse. I just had that square hunk laying around and threw it in the lathe to try it out. It was so darn hard and cranky that I couldn't really do anything with it on the shaving horse. But it sure made a solid handle for a froe when I finally got it done.

I'll report back when I get the changes made.

Rob
robgorrell
Regular
 
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Jul 08, 2011 4:50 pm
Location: West Virginia, USA

Re: My pole lathe so far.

Postby Bob_Fleet » Tue Oct 11, 2011 6:21 pm

robgorrell wrote:I did not realize that a pole lathe needed higher centers than a electric powered lathe.

I use both about the same height.
Spindle at the height of your elbows.
(Don't really want to think about Gavin's nipples. Some things should remain between a man and his wife. Sorry Claire).
http://www.onegoodturn.co.uk

Society is like a stew. If you don't keep it stirred up, you get a lot of scum on top.--Edward Abbey

Come and see us all at http://www.wooplaw.org.uk
User avatar
Bob_Fleet
Regular
 
Posts: 665
Joined: Tue Aug 15, 2006 8:11 pm
Location: Sunny Dunbar

Re: My pole lathe so far.

Postby gavin » Tue Oct 11, 2011 9:42 pm

Bob_Fleet wrote:
robgorrell wrote:I did not realize that a pole lathe needed higher centers than a electric powered lathe.

I use both about the same height.
Spindle at the height of your elbows.
(Don't really want to think about Gavin's nipples. Some things should remain between a man and his wife. Sorry Claire).

Well, there are some things you have to try once to know about... :shock: and a higher lathe bed is one of them!
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
User avatar
gavin
Regular
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 4:17 pm
Location: Dalbeattie, near Dumfries, Scotland


Return to Polelathe turning

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests