Return stroke wear

discussion of the niceties of turning on a bow, bungee or pole lathe.

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Return stroke wear

Postby simon » Mon Oct 24, 2011 9:59 am

When we turn we take the chisel off the wood on the return stroke. Why not do the same when planing? The same arguments must apply about taking the back off the edge of the tool.
If I am making gypsy flowers I run the drawknife back up the surface that has just been cut, I don't take it off the wood. I find it quicker and more efficient.
Any thoughts?
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Re: Return stroke wear

Postby rogerspianocat » Mon Oct 24, 2011 3:02 pm

Speaking with very little experience, I must confess, but I suspect that it is so that the workpiece can start moving without a sharp tool touching it - I think that would make it liable to jam and make the cord slip. Besides, it's no hardship to move the tool a mm or so away from the wood is it really? Don't suppose leaving the tool on would wear the tool, but it might wear the cord when it slips.

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Re: Return stroke wear

Postby SeanHellman » Mon Oct 24, 2011 7:59 pm

Different tools different techniques and different forces involved. The chisel is taken off the workpiece on the pole lathe, so that the return stroke is not slowed down and also when using the skew the corner, of said chisel, does not mark the wood just turned. To me it is about efficiency and not damaging my work. Surely if the chisel is left on the wood, over a very long time, the wood would abrade the bevel thus sharpening the chisel?
I am with you on the flowers, I do the same, it is efficient and so gets the job done faster and better. I think you are getting far more ware on the edge of the tool through the cutting than you will ever get from pulling it back over the wood.
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Re: Return stroke wear

Postby Don Wagstaff » Tue Oct 25, 2011 7:40 am

Hello,

I do lift the plane, or rather tilt it, on the return to reduce wear at the cutting edge. Not only that but, using Japanese saws, I lift the blade in the kerf on the down stroke as well with the same thought in mind. If you think about it, why not? There is really no extra effort involved once the action has become automatic.

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Re: Return stroke wear

Postby simon » Tue Oct 25, 2011 8:50 pm

Perhaps it's just horses for courses. I do automatically ease the chisel off when I am turning, and wince when I hear learners not doing it. Perrhaps I should adapt my use of other tools. I was quite expecting to find that I was not using the plane correctly. :oops:
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Re: Return stroke wear

Postby warrenee » Wed Oct 26, 2011 1:30 pm

For me it's all part of the holistic energies at play in using the polelathe, which are simply not present in a power lathe - all about the rhythm - the lifting of the chisel on the backstroke, almost with a minute circular motion in the elbows, is all part of the ebb and flow of that energy that is either unconsciously in sync or it isn't (and that's when you tear in)...

As utterly pretentious as I am fully aware this sounds, I'm sure there are those of you out there who know what I mean.
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