Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

discussion of the niceties of turning on a bow, bungee or pole lathe.

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby warrenee » Mon Jan 09, 2012 5:06 pm

I'm not convinced with that set up you'll have the correct room to bend your (treadling) leg without knocking your knee into frame and/or bench, or indeed to comfortably bend over the centres without breaking your back - but I'll wait for your report.
warrenee
Regular
 
Posts: 63
Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 4:09 pm
Location: Maidenhead, Berkshire

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby gavin » Mon Jan 09, 2012 8:38 pm

warrenee wrote:I'm not convinced with that set up you'll have the correct room to bend your (treadling) leg without knocking your knee into frame and/or bench, or indeed to comfortably bend over the centres without breaking your back - but I'll wait for your report.

Altho' the design Mstibs sketched above won't work well, it may work enough to be usable for simple turning projects e.g. tool handles. It would be lovely if the report included a Youtube video.
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
User avatar
gavin
Regular
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 4:17 pm
Location: Dalbeattie, near Dumfries, Scotland

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby mstibs » Mon Jan 09, 2012 9:03 pm

gavin wrote:It would be lovely if the report included a Youtube video.

Oh ... don't expect a video or report. It was just an idea I had when reading Holzbobs problem and some answers. I even don't have a workbench. Of course the space for the knee may be a problem, same counts for the stability. But I think the main objective was not needing much space in a tiny workshop. That's what I had in mind.

Best!
STIBS
Saxons. Were good wood-turners, they had to be because they were poor potters...from "A Short History of Woodturning with the Pole-lathe" by Brian G. Howarth; My bilingual (de/en) Blog: http://mstibs.wordpress.com
User avatar
mstibs
Regular
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Dresden/Saxony/Germany

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby Ian S » Mon Jan 09, 2012 10:00 pm

gavin wrote:Altho' the design Mstibs sketched above won't work well....


And why would that be, Gavin?

Make the frame out of 4X2 (100mm X 50mm), keep the projection over the front of the bench to the minimum, and if necessary add a couple of legs at the front corners to floor level. I think it would be as good as a Mike Abbott pole lathe 2000 or whatever it's called - certainly enough for someone to give spindle turning a pretty serious trial.

Wooplaw has three lathes which are built out of 4X2. They are maybe a touch flexible, but they work, they're made from easily available wood and they give people the chance to try turning.

Cheers
How sharp is sharp enough?
Ian S
Regular
 
Posts: 370
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 8:33 pm
Location: Edinburgh

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby gavin » Tue Jan 10, 2012 10:23 am

Ian S wrote:
gavin wrote:Altho' the design Mstibs sketched above won't work well....


And why would that be, Gavin?


If the lathe was at workbench height, that's rather low to work well as a lathe. And I agree that that Ian S is quite correct when he suggests this lathe set up at workbench height is certainly enough for someone to give spindle turning a pretty serious trial.

That's what this board is about: trying things out to see if they work for you.
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
User avatar
gavin
Regular
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 4:17 pm
Location: Dalbeattie, near Dumfries, Scotland

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby Joe DesLauriers » Tue Jan 10, 2012 10:37 pm

This is a treadle lathe workbench Combo not a pole lathe but it has good ideas Here is a link to Stephen Shepherd's Build an 1805 Treadle Lathe http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com//Mer ... arch=lathe plans
Joe DesLauriers
Regular
 
Posts: 68
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2008 2:03 pm
Location: Western North Carolina,USA

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby jrccaim » Sat Jan 14, 2012 5:57 am

I went back to http://www.greenwoodworking.com (Jennie Alexander's site) since I haven't been there for a while and had forgoten the details of the lathe. I suggest that one go there and look at it (you have to scroll down all the way to the bottom of the homepage). The lathe is a jewel. But it relies entirely on Mr Alexander's workbench. This ia classic narrow cabinetmaker's bench with an end vise and square dogholes over the place along the edges of the workbench. In cabinetmaking, you use dogs to hold stuff down, particularly when planing. It also has an end vise, a big contraption that looks like part of the bench but moves along the long side of the bench. It also has a dog hole or two. So Alexander's poppets are just very high dogs with the centers on top of the dogs. He drops these poppets into the square dogholes, and there's the lathe bed. He is turning parallel to the short edge of the bench. He opens up the end vise to acommodate the cord. The treadle is fixed to a bench leg with a spacer block. It operates parallel to the long end. Bungee spring; could use a bow or even a door spring. It works, and has complete insturctions for making tool handles.

But it does rely entirely on dogholes and an end vise. I have now set out to make a lathe suitable for making tool handles that would clamp in a vise. More than that and I think that a vise is not strong enough to take the stress of turning. Maybe a 10" Record vise, now defunct, but you can buy copies made in (guess where) at reasoable prices. I insist on an adjustable tail poppet and this is a lot of extra work. Today I jointed the fixed poppet to the "bed", namely a 2x4 offcut. As and if I progess I will post. Tomorrrow, however, will be spent sharpening tools.
User avatar
jrccaim
Regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 3:53 am
Location: Willow, Alaska USA

5 minute pole lathe

Postby Holzbob » Thu Jan 19, 2012 9:56 pm

I made a mock up to show what I'm thinking about.
Here I used my second lightweight bench because it was less cluttered than the big one.
The non-bungee-end of the rope is fixed to the top of bench just behind the vice.
At the end of the pedal you can see a small clamp - here would have to be the only pulley that is needed.
When I push the pedal to the floor it's tip will travel distance B. The piece of rope C will run through the pulley and be located behind it when the pedal is down. The distance between pulley and workpiece is also increased by the lenght of C. So pushing the pedal 1 x B leads to a travel of the rope of 2 x C which is about the same as 2 x B - so my travel is doubled. I tried it an it works in practice just as it should from theory.

Problem: The pedal as shown is not especially ergonomic to say the least. I will have to find a way to get a travel of about B and have a pedal that is't as steep. It could be worthwhile to try an elevated pivot point at the back of the pedal. Below the vice there are no drawers and the bench is about 60 cm deep. So there is enough space for a short pedal.
My big bench and it's vice are easily strong enough. German cabinetmaker benches have a different, much stronger, vice design than that on the swedish lightweight bench on the picture. Why I like very much the dog hole mounted tips of Jennie Alexander is that the equipment really only takes up the absolute minimum of space and it should be quite sturdy because the parts have only short lengths in comparison to their cross section.

Solutions with more pulleys will probably lead to lots of gordian knots - so keep your sword at hand.

it will take a while before I will really get started with this project - I will show the results then.

Bob
Attachments
IMGP7587 klein b.jpg
IMGP7587 klein b.jpg (213.06 KiB) Viewed 7352 times
Holzbob
Regular
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue Dec 13, 2011 9:56 pm

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby jrccaim » Thu Jan 26, 2012 6:25 am

I promised I would report progress, so here it is. I have constructed a pole lathe that clamps in a vise, for the purpose of making tool handles and other small turnings.
DSCN0832h.JPG
DSCN0832h.JPG (29.32 KiB) Viewed 7313 times

Just for the record, all scrap wood, all hand tools except for some hole drilling. The bed is a 28 cm piece of 2x4 offcut scrounged from somewhere. The poppets are 2x2 ditto. The headstock is fixed permanently in place by pegs in a mortise. The tailstock is adjustable by about ohh 15cm and runs in a slot held down by a peg. The tool rest is a piece of steel , call it 1/8" or 3mm out of a hardware store. set into blocks screwed to the poppets. I cut it too short! As you can see it clamps to the vise. The points or centers were filed to 60 deg and here (not having a grinder indoors) I filed them on my Taig microlathe -- if I had a topslide this would have taken five minutes; it took half an hour for both points. But because I filed the points (with a template) on a lathe they are perfectly symmetrical. Center height 50mm.

Does it work? Well, it dawned on me that I could clamp it in a workmate and attach the bungee to a hook I have in the of the kitchen/dining room where I hang a lamp during power outages.
DSCN0837.JPG
DSCN0837.JPG (21.78 KiB) Viewed 7313 times

So that's what I did. Fifteen minutes or so of turning and I have made te pice of branchwood above into a respectable tool handle. My son kindly took a picture of the turning. My brand-new mini-bandsaw is acting as sheer mass to keep the workmate form wandering. This does not require a bandsaw, of course! Bag of sand would do it. Treadle is an old mop handle. Vey easy to treadle; I suspect the nice centers I made have a lot to do with it.
User avatar
jrccaim
Regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 3:53 am
Location: Willow, Alaska USA

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby gavin » Thu Jan 26, 2012 10:32 am

JR,
I love the improvisation of this item. :D

From your picture it seems the string will chafe and wear out quickly.
    1. Is the string really threaded ( or lead through the 'lathe' ) as shown in your picture above?

    2. If so, how much did it wear in the use you've given it so far?

    3. Would a different lead be possible?
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
User avatar
gavin
Regular
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 4:17 pm
Location: Dalbeattie, near Dumfries, Scotland

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby jrccaim » Fri Jan 27, 2012 5:55 am

gavin wrote:JR,
I love the improvisation of this item. :D

From your picture it seems the string will chafe and wear out quickly.
    1. Is the string really threaded ( or lead through the 'lathe' ) as shown in your picture above?

    2. If so, how much did it wear in the use you've given it so far?

    3. Would a different lead be possible?


I love to improvise -- I would not make a good orchestral musician :).

The cord is nylon "parachute cord." (so called in the USA). I didn't have any clotheline inside the house so I used that. It is tough and not too smooth outside. So far the wear is not perceptible at all. Parachute cord is very cheap hereabouts. I thought it it would slip, but no. It works better than cotton. The cord in the picture goes between the toolrest and the lathe bed, so no drag there. It is rubbing on the bottom of the bed. This is fixed by moving the mop handle -- er, treadle -- around, but I got careless.

A different lead would certainly be possible. One could, for instance, attach a block of wood to the thing with a slot for the cord in it. What I did for roughing out is to attach the cord to the left end of the turning, on the outboard end. Then it hangs straight down. But when you want the cord in the middle this does not go. Basically to move the cord you drag the workmate around. In a shop vise you would not get away with this :), and would have to do something else. Experiments continue.
User avatar
jrccaim
Regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 3:53 am
Location: Willow, Alaska USA

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby jrccaim » Mon Jan 30, 2012 3:27 am

Obviously there is a better lead: wrap as usual, out back to tip of treadle, tip of treadle to left of workmate. Duh! But we learned from our mistakes. Now I have to improve the treadle a bit. Also learned I could work the thing sitting down, big advantage when you back aches.
User avatar
jrccaim
Regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 3:53 am
Location: Willow, Alaska USA

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby jrccaim » Sun Feb 19, 2012 5:17 am

I have posted some of the construction details of polecat, my name for a workmate-clamped pole lathe for tool handles, to my blog, [url]chalupyacres.blogspot.com[/url]. My last post (as of just now) also has some elementary turning points. Boring stuff to veteran bodgers but maybe useful to beginners.
User avatar
jrccaim
Regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 3:53 am
Location: Willow, Alaska USA

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby jrccaim » Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:05 am

Since my last post on this subject, I have done quite a lot of work with this little lathe and it is a beauty. Don't quite know why but it just feels right. This week I reformed my treadle arrangements. Details in my blog, http://www.chalupyacres.blogspot.com. Now I am trying to turn plates/bowls on it. Made a mandrel. This kind of work is much more difficult than tool handles. This is, of course., because on a featherweight lathe like this, imbalances affect you much more than they do on a bigger lathe. Also found out that weighting the workmate is not really necessary (although it does not hurt and might even be necessary for some purposes) because I used it without the bandsaw today with no adverse effects. The bandsaw merely adds weight. Could use a sack of dog food, a bag of sand, whatever. But If you keep the lead straignt, extra weight not necessary. Yet. Stay tuned.
User avatar
jrccaim
Regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 3:53 am
Location: Willow, Alaska USA

Re: Pole lathe ad-on to carpenters workbench

Postby jrccaim » Sun Mar 18, 2012 4:27 am

Here is the latest incarnation of the workmate-clamped lathe:
DSCN0859h.jpg
DSCN0859h.jpg (37.08 KiB) Viewed 7112 times

It has acquired a mast and a lever. The mast is a broken ski pole epoxied to a 2x4, same width as the lathe. A scrap piece is the lever. Bungee to your right, hooks to lever, ties to workmate. Treadle still the mop handle, much improved by a base. It turns fine.
DSCN0860h.jpg
DSCN0860h.jpg (31.12 KiB) Viewed 7112 times


On the whole, a good return for zero investment. And I don't have to drag it under a ceiling hook anymore, and I was worried about a ceiling hook pulling out. Getting off-topic a bit. Point is, pole lathes are not very complex creatures.
User avatar
jrccaim
Regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 3:53 am
Location: Willow, Alaska USA

PreviousNext

Return to Polelathe turning

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron