Very Basic Polelathe!

discussion of the niceties of turning on a bow, bungee or pole lathe.

Moderators: jrccaim, Bob_Fleet, gavin, Robin Fawcett, HughSpencer

Re: Very Basic Polelathe!

Postby ToneWood » Wed Dec 05, 2012 2:58 pm

Gavin, I like your suggestions:
A Dummies Guide to Greenwood - would be a good place to introduce the breadth of the subject, tools & range of projects
My first project (or Your first project) - is a good idea too (butter spreader?)
My second project - need to know where to go next :)
My third project, etc.

We occasionally carried knives as kids. Simple pen-knives for putting a point on a stick/pencil or cutting a bow/arrow, or cutting fishing line/string/bailing twine. Sheath knives were not allowed (in my family) until age 12. My son though is loathe to even touch a knife, other than for eating. They've been warned off them at school &/or the media, and he knows that to carry one risks breaking the law. I find it sad and, in the countryside, unnecessary. It seems like carving is basic skill that we should all know to some level, we should all do a little sloyd.
Last edited by ToneWood on Thu Dec 06, 2012 1:41 pm, edited 3 times in total.
ToneWood
Regular
 
Posts: 1846
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 2:21 pm

Re: Very Basic Polelathe!

Postby jrccaim » Thu Dec 06, 2012 6:47 am

[list=][/list]
gavin wrote:
jrccaim wrote: we need a place for young people somewhere, probably in Beginner's Corner. Must think about that.

Great idea!
What shall we call that section for starting-off people?
    easy projects
    My first project
    your first project
    your first 7 projects
    Greenwood projects for dummies
    Dummies Guide to Greenwood ... ?

More ideas please!
- let's not be age-ist. 'Cos people can be sensitive to an idea that projects are age-related - better to be more inclusive.


Ah, Gavin, spot on as usual. Really like the age-related comment. Absolutely right. However, I think there are really two separate categories, adults and children. After all, most adults, unfortunately under the influence of the Nanny culture, are kind of safety-aware. Children are not. They have to learn. I would like to see two categories in beginner's corner.

    FIrst projects (for adults). [ I am willing to accept almost any variant on this tilte].
    Working with children [Not so willing to compromise on the title]

Reasons I say this. Children -- and I define this as Scout/Guide age, 11-14 -- are much more impatient than adults. Instant payoff, that's the ticket.Shortest done, best project. Also they have been stuffed to the gills with all kind of TV propaganda. Weapons are the King (or Queen). Knives, axes, lances,.. on and on. Furthermore as I said before they have no idea of the damage an edged tool can do to your anatomy. So it is up to us to guide them wisely. As they get older, and probably have had a few band-aids (plasters) to their credit, they will acquire a respect for edges. This is called "education" in some circles. And yes, perhaps some blood-letting is necessary. As little as possible of course. Our Nannies will be horrified. But it is life. As long as we keep them out of the Emergency Room, we have done our job. We have taught. Keep your **** fingers away from sharp edges. And by the way dull edges are far more dangerous than sharp ones.

Adults, on the other hand, are very safety-aware. Furthermore thay are aware that something might take more than one hour (or even ten minutes!) What they doubt is their ability. Different mind-set. Example: make a chair. This is beyond the capacity of most children, unless you allow power tools, reamer bits of all kinds, and tapering bits.And for all I know a power saw. Hardly bodgering! But an adult can read Mike Abbot's books and kind of figure out the stuff he or she needs, and actually go make one. Not that I recomend a chair as a first project! 'Tis but an example. So say spoon-carving. Good first project. All we need is a pointer to Robin Wood's stuff. Many other examples.

Point is, children and adults are not the same thing. Need a space for both. I remain open to any suggestions, comments or criticism. You will not hurt my feelings, believe me. "Not to criticize, but to learn" said Neils Bohr, Nobel in Physics, and one of my heroes.
User avatar
jrccaim
Regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 3:53 am
Location: Willow, Alaska USA

Re: Very Basic Polelathe!

Postby gavin » Thu Dec 06, 2012 9:34 am

We discuss what name should be given to beginner projects on this board, their grading and the related suggestion that kids need a quick return on their investment of time, and their parents' need for kid-safety.

JR suggests this distinction:
jrccaim wrote:FIrst projects (for adults). [ I am willing to accept almost any variant on this tilte].
Working with children [Not so willing to compromise on the title]


I am happy with those titles.

Can we define 'child' as:
    You are an adult if your parents let you work with a knife by yourself and unsupervised. Do any project that takes your fancy !
    You are a child if your parents won't let you work alone with a knife on wood. Only attempt the Working with Children projects.
Gavin Phillips


- teacher, demonstrator & supporter of greenwoodworking & human-powered turning
- Supplier of Fun & Confidence

info@shed-therapy.com
http://www.shed-therapy.com
User avatar
gavin
Regular
 
Posts: 1595
Joined: Mon May 16, 2005 4:17 pm
Location: Dalbeattie, near Dumfries, Scotland

Re: Very Basic Polelathe!

Postby ToneWood » Thu Dec 06, 2012 1:53 pm

Just watched the video. I love the simplicity of the lathe*. I found the maker's pace of speech and pronunciation very clear - much easier to follow than the fast-paced tape recordings we were subjected to at school 35 years ago - but alas my limited & rusty German vocabulary prevented me from understanding it :(. My son is revising German currently, so I have offered to help, in the hope that it might help me too :).

*Although the lathe is beautifully simple, those end pins looked rather clever & fancy, with their removable end-points/cones. Can any of our German speakers (or turners) explain what he used - or did he make/buy those specifically for the task?
ToneWood
Regular
 
Posts: 1846
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 2:21 pm

Re: Very Basic Polelathe!

Postby ToneWood » Thu Dec 06, 2012 2:16 pm

Almost forgot, the maker's book:

Werken mit dem Taschenmesser: 26 Schnitzanleitungen vom Klangstab bis zum Segelboot by Felix Immler

Image

i.e. Working with the pocket-knife: 26 carving projects from chime-bar to sailboat.

Learnt a new German word today: Zimmermann = carpenter. As in Zimmermannsbohrer - a carpenters' borer i.e. a brace & bit, according to Jogge's book.
I was wondering what a "room man" could be :D.
ToneWood
Regular
 
Posts: 1846
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 2:21 pm

Re: Very Basic Polelathe!

Postby jrccaim » Sat Dec 08, 2012 7:14 am

ToneWood wrote:Just watched the video. I love the simplicity of the lathe*. I found the maker's pace of speech and pronunciation very clear - much easier to follow than the fast-paced tape recordings we were subjected to at school 35 years ago - but alas my limited & rusty German vocabulary prevented me from understanding it :(. My son is revising German currently, so I have offered to help, in the hope that it might help me too :).

*Although the lathe is beautifully simple, those end pins looked rather clever & fancy, with their removable end-points/cones. Can any of our German speakers (or turners) explain what he used - or did he make/buy those specifically for the task?


I think I explained it before. The centers are not cone-shaped. Instead they are bored. Inside these bores there are cone-pointed "real centers". So he has a steel-on-steel "live" pair of centers. Live because the centers rotate. As opposed to the usual polelathe "dead" centers, where the wood rotates around the steel point. If you did this with machine tools (in fact he had to do this with machine tools, drill press as a minimum) and got a really smooth finish on both ends of the center it would be a plus, but the squeak in the video tells me this is not so. A lot of oil would help; but for my money this is not the way to do bodger's polelathe centers. If you want an honest-to-deity real live center you should use ball or roller bearings and this he did not do. But although I admire ball bearings in their proper context I do not think this is the way to go for a basic polelathe. Plain dead centers will do the job (aided by veg oil) and and are much easier to make. Not all of us have a metalworking lathe. Or even a pillar drill. Good grief. Take a 16d (or bigger) nail, head cut off, into a DIY drill. Clamp it in a Workmate. Start it. Take a file to the points. Make them smoothly conical. Finish with wet & dry. Much better if you take ohh 12-15mm mm rod and do the same thing. Take longer to do of course. But it is machine shop stuff to do Herr Taschenmesserbuch's centers. The ideal cone angle BTW is 60 deg but I have had centers work at fine at 45 so I would not take the number too seriously. For the tailstock you want threaded rod. Put a point on it same way. First few lathes I built lacked this refinement. Used a wooden mallet to pound the tail center in. Worked, and that's how I learned to turn.
User avatar
jrccaim
Regular
 
Posts: 1082
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2008 3:53 am
Location: Willow, Alaska USA

Re: Very Basic Polelathe!

Postby ToneWood » Mon Dec 10, 2012 2:17 pm

Point taken jrrcaim, I did read your original post, I was just curious about those metal-fittings. They seemed out-of-place/inappropriate for ultimate simplicity - which seemed to be what was being aimed for - but perhaps pragmatic for performance.

BTW I think that guy would likely injure his back if he keeps working all hunched up like that (a topic being discussed on another thread currently, viewtopic.php?f=23&t=2650). I find it's usually well worth spending a bit of time adjusting things to fit your body - and re-assessing the fit from time-to-time.
ToneWood
Regular
 
Posts: 1846
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 2:21 pm

Previous

Return to Polelathe turning

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 3 guests

cron