Not a midge in sight.

discussion of the niceties of turning on a bow, bungee or pole lathe.

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Not a midge in sight.

Postby Bob_Fleet » Tue Aug 20, 2013 12:10 pm

Great weekend on Bute making a pole lathe with the folk from Bute Forest.
Amazing place, amazing views, amazing woods, amazing folk and now a pole lathe.
Hopefully a few might join up and set up a local APT group.
group.jpg
team pic on Sunday.
group.jpg (51.11 KiB) Viewed 7108 times

Just south of the Rhubadoch ferry in Bute Forest their community woodland.
CalMac car fares up to 5m length. We found out our pole was 4.85 m, whew, save a bit of trimming.
Lots of greenwood enthusiasm so folk started on spoon carving, bowl carving, turning - they even made their first mallet on the lathe.
A wee discussion about how great a gridshell would be - anyone expert to consult on this forum?
(They've got a wood mizer and lots of trees.)

Weather was mixed but it was at home too and not a midge in sight.
Great place to visit.
Bute Forest Website
http://www.onegoodturn.co.uk

Society is like a stew. If you don't keep it stirred up, you get a lot of scum on top.--Edward Abbey

Come and see us all at http://www.wooplaw.org.uk
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Re: Not a midge in sight.

Postby jrccaim » Thu Aug 22, 2013 5:21 am

Erm, not sure what a "gridshell" might be. Would you enlighten me? Maybe it's called something else this side of the pond.

Glad you had no midges. We, on the other hand, have ahd far too many mosquitoes. The average is three hatches per year and that is bad enough. This year we had four. Rather wet, you see, and the mosquitoes dote on that. Anyway I advise head-nets for biting insects.
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Re: Not a midge in sight.

Postby Bob_Fleet » Thu Aug 22, 2013 10:47 am

A gridshell is a flexible wood lattice erected as a framework for a roof or similar.
Weald and Downland Museum is a great example of a large one. Loads of pics if you google and then select images.
The lattice is made and hoisted into the curve then fixed. The some of the spaces at the edges must be nearly diamond shaped when in place.
Often it is then used as the 'base' to plank the roof in several directions so the strength comes from the 'mega-plywood' you create.
Image
This is the one at Pishwanton - google it. Membrane and turf on top of it now like a hobbit house.

Now architects have formidable computing power to plan the final form before erection and every beam and joint can be precut.
Hoisting it and fixing it where it touches sounds like a great community project though.
Hopefully they'll manage it using living trees if the structure can be manouvered inside them first.
Plenty of sitka there but knotty, will that do? Possibly single screw each joint so the wood can still move.
Magic project, want to go when it happens.

I like the thought of biting insects with nets over their heads. Must take a while to put them all on. Who supplies them? :)
http://www.onegoodturn.co.uk

Society is like a stew. If you don't keep it stirred up, you get a lot of scum on top.--Edward Abbey

Come and see us all at http://www.wooplaw.org.uk
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Re: Not a midge in sight.

Postby jrccaim » Sat Aug 24, 2013 6:17 am

Bob_Fleet wrote:A gridshell is a flexible wood lattice erected as a framework for a roof or similar....


Aha. What we call a Yurt in this country. This is a Russian word for a mongolian construction; the Mongol word is ger.
[/quote]
...
Plenty of sitka there but knotty, will that do? Possibly single screw each joint so the wood can still move.

Might I suggest lashing it with parachute cord, or even nylon string? I have lashed stuff that has survived four Alaskan winters. Don't want to teach gran to suck eggs. But more bodgerlike. Cannot recommend natural fibers for longevity, though. Much as I hate it.
I like the thought of biting insects with nets over their heads. Must take a while to put them all on. Who supplies them? :)


My net takes all of one second to put on. Not really a problem.

Did a quick google on "mosquito head nets". Found Amazon at the breathtaking sum of $2.88 plus shipping. Yes, one quid close enough:) I can find these things in any sporting goods store in Alaska for about $5. Might want to ad UK to the search parameters. If you are in a hurry you might conisder apiary (beekeepers) suppliers in the UK. I know for sure there are bees in the UK; seen them myself and Sherlock Holmes used to raise them. Happen to have one myself. Do not like it because I can't wear my hat over it. Just me. Beekeepers nets have a wire frame that keeps the bloodsucking b*****s away from your head. The mesh is quite fine, should deter midges as well. Might take five whole seconds to put on. But you will have to abandon your hat :)
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Re: Not a midge in sight.

Postby jrccaim » Sat Aug 24, 2013 6:19 am

Bob_Fleet wrote:A gridshell is a flexible wood lattice erected as a framework for a roof or similar....


Aha. What we call a Yurt in this country. This is a Russian word for a mongolian construction; the Mongol word is ger.
[/quote]
...
Plenty of sitka there but knotty, will that do? Possibly single screw each joint so the wood can still move.

Might I suggest lashing it with parachute cord, or even nylon string? I have lashed stuff that has survived four Alaskan winters. Don't want to teach gran to suck eggs. But more bodgerlike. Cannot recommend natural fibers for longevity, though. Much as I hate it.
I like the thought of biting insects with nets over their heads. Must take a while to put them all on. Who supplies them? :)


My net takes all of one second to put on. Not really a problem.

Did a quick google on "mosquito head nets". Found Amazon at the breathtaking sum of $2.88 plus shipping. Yes, one quid close enough:) I can find these things in any sporting goods store in Alaska for about $5. Might want to ad UK to the search parameters. If you are in a hurry you might conisder apiary (beekeepers) suppliers in the UK. I know for sure there are bees in the UK; seen them myself and Sherlock Holmes used to raise them. Happen to have one myself. Do not like it because I can't wear my hat over it. Just me. Beekeepers nets have a wire frame that keeps the bloodsucking b*****s away from your head. The mesh is quite fine, should deter midges as well. Might take five whole seconds to put on. But you will have to abandon your hat :)[/quote]
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Re: Not a midge in sight.

Postby Bob_Fleet » Sun Aug 25, 2013 9:37 pm

jrccaim wrote:Anyway I advise head-nets for biting insects.
Nets for the insects' heads not yours.

The lattice is a square grid to start with. Not really like a yurt. Great god Google is good on this.
The cord a good idea but planks nailed on top might trap and weaken. Screws or coach bolts would be flush.
Once planked over, the strength is in the boards not the original grid frame, I think.
I'm no expert but keen to try it out somewhere.
It might be a teach ourselves exercise which is fun but some fundamental questions and early answers might prevent a lot of wasted time re-inventing the wheel.
http://www.onegoodturn.co.uk

Society is like a stew. If you don't keep it stirred up, you get a lot of scum on top.--Edward Abbey

Come and see us all at http://www.wooplaw.org.uk
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Back on another Scottish Island

Postby Bob_Fleet » Mon May 04, 2015 8:47 pm

Tim from Bute came and joined me and this year we made it to Arran.
Working with a great group outside their Arran Outdoor Education Centre we managed to make three pole lathes and three shaving horses over the weekend.
Well, a few wee bits still to finish off once we'd gone.
Great pics on their Facebook page too.
Maybe a few will join the APT and start a local group.
group.jpg
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Under the end of the building as it was a bit wet on the Sunday morning.
Rare in Scotland but it was a bank holiday.

Next - more work on getting yet another Scottish Island bodging.
http://www.onegoodturn.co.uk

Society is like a stew. If you don't keep it stirred up, you get a lot of scum on top.--Edward Abbey

Come and see us all at http://www.wooplaw.org.uk
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